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Full text of "The Labour gazette January-June 1947"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Guelph, University of Windsor, York University and University of Toronto Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/labourgazette1947p1cana 



(jOU.-IJbC 




THE 

LABOUR GAZETTE 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR, CANADA 



VOLUME XLVII ' 






UrvC- 



FOR THE YEAR 

1947 



483305 

4 t- 49 



Minister — Hon. Humphrey Mitchell 
Deputy Minister — Arthur MacNamara, C.M.G., LL.D. Editor — Harry J. Walker 



OTTAWA 

EDMOND CLOUTIER, C.M.G., B.A., L.Ph., 

KING'S PRINTER AND CONTROLLER OF STATIONERY 

1948 



LEGEND 



A.F. of L. 
B.N.A. Act 
C.C.C.L. 
C.C. of 1 
C.I.O. . 
C.M.A. . 
C.V.T. . 
D.B. of ! 
D.V.A. . 
I.A.P.A. 
I.D.I. .. 
I.L.O. .. 
N.E.S. i: 
N.L.R.B. 
N.W.L.B. 
R.T.B. 
T. and L.C 
T.U.C. .. 
U.A.W. . 
U.I.C. .. 
U.M.W. 
U.N.O... 
W.B.T.P. 
W.L.R.R. 
W.P.T.B. 



American Federation of Labour 
.British North America Act 

Canadian and Catholic Confederation of Labour 
Canadian Congress of Labour 
Congress of Industrial Organizations 
Canadian Manufacturers' Association 
Canadian Vocational Training 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
Department of Veterans Affairs 
Industrial Accident Prevention Associations 
Industrial Disputes Investigation (Act) 
International Labour Organization 
National Employment Service 
National Labour Relations Board 
National War Labour Board 
Railway Transportation Brotherhoods 
Trades and Labour Congress (of Canada) 
Trades Union Congress (British) 
United Automobile, Aircraft and Agricultural Implement Workers of America 
Unemployment Insurance Commission 
United Mine Workers (of America) 
United Nations Organization 
Wartime Bureau of Technical Personnel 
Wartime Labour Relations Regulations 
Wartime Prices and Trade Board 



HP 

Sioi 



c O 



ERRATA 

On page 321 — under "Work Injuries in United States"— Column 1— 1st and 2nd lines— read 

"The January issue of the U.S. Monthly Labour Review reports that "approximately ". 

On page 868— Column 3— opposite "durable goods"— for $19,460,934 read $18,460,934 



INDEX 



Abbott, Hon. D. C, Minister of Finance: 
on removal of price control from additional 
goods and services, 48>6. 

Absenteeism: 

Canada — 

increased absenteeism in coal mine industry 
indicated in report of Royal Commis- 
sion on Coal, 309. 
penalties for absenteeism contained in col- 
lective agreements in fishing industry, 
1443. 
union discipline for absenteeism, etc., 
established under agreement in cloth- 
ing industry, 1411. 
U.S.A.: effect of long working hours on 
absenteeism, 1445, 1446. 

Accidents : 

farm accidents in Canada and the United 
States, 1888. 

report of Committee on Statistics of Indus- 
trial Injuries submitted to Inter- 
national Conference of Labour Statis- 
ticians, 1596. 

Governing Body of ILO authorizes factory 
safety conference to draft Model Code 
of Safety Provisions for Factories, 786. 

recommendations of Textiles Committee of 
ILO, on accident prevention, 141. 
Canada — 

provisions of Government Employees' Com- 
pensation Act, 1326. 

non-fatal accidents and fires — D. B. of S. 
survey on farm accidents, 1887. 

accidents decline among older workers, 
1254. 

hazards of coal mining described in report 
of Royal Commission on Coal, 304. 

analysis of 1946 fatalities by industries, 
causes, etc., 472. 

fatalities during first and second quarters 
of 1947, 766, 1239; during fourth 
quarter of 1946, 274. 

amendment to provincial (Quebec) law 
governing accident prevention requested 
by C.C.C.L., 1588. 

recommendation of C.C. of L. re mining 
accidents, 1585. 
B.C.: annual report of Workmen's Compen- 
sation Board (1946), 1087. 
Man.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1946), 621. 
N.B.: annual report of Workmen's Compen- 
sation Board, 768. 
N.S.: total number of accidents for each 
year, 1942-1946, as reported by Work- 
men's Compensation Board, 767. 
Ont.: proceedings of 1946 annual meeting and 
convention of I.A.P.A., 292; annual 
report of Workmen's Compensation 
Board (1946), 1088; increase in injuries 
to young workers reported by I.A.P.A., 
631. 
Que.: report of Workmen's Compensation 
Commission (1945), 1688, (1944), 117. 



Accidents — Con. 

Sask.: amendments in Workmen's Compen- 
sation (Accident Fund) Act, 1492; 
accidents reported to Workmen's Com- 
pensation Board in 1945 and 1946, 910. 

United Kingdom: annual report of Inspector 
of Factories (1945), li51; compensa- 
tion for industrial injuries — alternative 
remedies of workmen's compensation 
and action for damages considered by 
Committee on Alternative Remedies, 
159- J 6i2; review of report on Accident 
Prevention in the Dyeing and Finishing 
Industry, 7. 

U.S.A.: statistical report on work injuries, 
321; liability of juvenile workers to 
machine accidents, 1248; effect of long 
working hours on industrial injuries, 
1445, 1446; survey of farm accidents, 



See also Legal Decisions; Safety; Time-loss; 
Workmen's Compensation. 

Admission Policies : 

See Discrimination. 

Adult Education: 

Man. — 

report of Royal Commission on Adult 
Education, 1089. 

Agreements : 

study on collective agreements in Great 
Britain, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, 
Denmark, Sweden, and France, 1124. 

negotiation of collective agreements urged 
in resolution adopted by I.L.O. 
Industrial Committee on Inland Trans- 
port, 1121. 
Canada — 

monthly summary of collective agreements 
and wage schedules, 44, 183, 366, 541, 
687, 823, 999, 1171, 1304, 1470, 1657, 
1799. 

monthly summary of agreements under Col- 
lective Agreement Act (Quebec), 47, 
185, 368, 543, 689, 825, 1001, 1173, 1300, 
1473, 1659, 1801. 

arbitration award of Hon. Mr. Justice 
C. P. McTague in meat packing dis- 
pute, 1753, 1791-96. 

provisions of Industrial Relations Bill, No. 
338 (Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act), 925; text of Bill, 
933; hearings of House of Commons 
Industrial Relations Committee, 1102-7. 

agreement reached in Great Lakes shipping 
dispute, 1247. 

settlement of dispute over vacations with 
pay for railway employees, 1561. 

rest period® and dismissal pay provided in 
recent collective agreements in manu- 
facturing industry, 1756. 

agreement makes employees of lumber firm 
liable for illegal strike, 911. 

continuation of farm labour agreements, 
487. 



6384— U 



INDEX 



Agreements — Con. 

unusual features of recent collective agree- 
ments in clothing and rubber indus- 
tries, 1411. 
collective agreements in certain industries: 

agricultural implements, 1535. 

brewery products, 994 -95. 

clothing, 1411. 

edible plant products — flour milling, 1854; 
bread and cake manufacturing; 1855; 
biscuit manufacturing, 185'8; confec- 
tionery manufacturing, 18&1. 

electrical machinery and apparatus, 1724. 

fishing, 1420-44. 

manufacturing, 1756. 

meat products, 1851. 
-""' motor vehicles, 1169. 
" — 'motor vehicle parts and accessories, 1532. 

pulp and paper, 988. 

radio sets and parts, 1728. 

rubber products, ll'&4, 1411. 

sawmill products, 1376' — planing mill, 
sash and door, 1380, wooden furniture, 
1383. 
amendment in provincial Labour Relations 
Act (Quebec) requested by C.C.C.L., 
1587. _ 
B.C.: provisions of Industrial Conciliation and 

Arbitration Act (1947), 1016. 
N.S.: provisions of Fishermen's Federation 

Act, 1330. 
Que.: types of union security provisions in 
collective agreements indicated in sur- 
vey conducted by Industrial Relations 
Department of Laval University, 
134-35; number of workers covered by 
collective agreements — annual report of 
Department of Labour (194'5), 1685. 
United Kingdom: conciliation machinery in 
building industry, 791, 792; in coal 
mining industry, 5'13; five-day week in 
coal mines provided in agreement 
reached between miners and National 
Coal Board, 632; provisions of agree- 
ments negotiated by National Maritime 
Board; re post-war employment condi- 
tions in merchant ships, 633; Britain 
and France conclude agreement on 
recruitment of displaced persons, 1249; 
provision of five-day week for machin- 
ists and related workers, 7; agreement 
for public holidays with pay in build- 
ing and civil engineering contracting 
industries, 1414. 
France: Britain and France conclude agree- 
ment on recruitment of displaced per- 
sons, 1249. 
Italy: mediation machinery established in all 
plants — compulsory creation of factory 
commissions, 1250. 
U.S.A.: number of workers under collective 
agreements in 1946, 777, 919; report 
on collective agreements providing ad- 
justments of wages to cost of living, 
792; guaranteed annual wage plan 
established for garment workers under 
terms of collective agreement, 637; 
worker security plans in collective 
agreements — growth of health and wel- 
fare and guaranteed wage plans, 319; 
collective bargaining developments in 
union health and welfare plans, 1126; 
novel union shop clauses in collective 
agreements, 492; findings of survey on 
collective agreements between trade 
unions and groups of employers, 657; 



Agreements — Con. 

arbitration procedure established in 
building trades, 282; provisions of new 
collective agreements in coal mines, 
1099; wage increases granted in manu- 
facturing industry, 636; agreement 
reached between Western Electric Com- 
pany and Association of Communica- 
tions Equipment Workers, 778; Rand 
formula provided in collective agree- 
ments covering employees of Western 
Union Telegraph Company, 920; recom- 
mendation of National Association of 
Manufacturers, 10; legislation govern- 
ing public utilities in New Jersey, 62, 
in New York State, 62. 
See also Collective Bargaining; Industrial 
Standards Acts; Legal Decisions. 

Classification by Industries: 

Construction — buildings and structures — 

bricklayers, Halifax, and Dartmouth, 1475. 

bricklayers and stonemasons, Ottawa, 188. 

builders' labourers, Victoria, 689. 

building labourers, Vancouver, 46. 

building trades, Chicoutimi, 185; Hull, 
186, 1662; Joliette, 1175; Montreal, 
186, 371, 690, 1003, 1308, 1662; 
Quebec, 49, 1175, 1662, 1803; St. 
Hyacinthe, 1002, 1308; St. Jerome, 
50, 371, 1175; St. Johns and Iber- 
ville. 50, 370, 544; Sherbrooke, 1661; 
Sorel, 544, 1804; Three Rivers, 370, 
1662. 

carpenters, Brockville, 1476; Cornwall, 
1475; Grande Prairie, 1664; Halifax 
and Dartmouth, 1475; Kenora and 
Keewatin, 827; Lethbridge, 189; 
Moose Jaw, 1663; Oshawa and 
Whitby, 827; Ottawa, 188, 546, 1663; 
Powell River district, Kamloops and 
district, Courtenay district, Chilliwack 
and district, Prince George district, 
Penticton district, 689; Sydney, 184. 

electrical workers, Halifax and Dart- 
mouth. 1475; London, 827; Ottawa, 
188; Toronto, 1173. 

elevator constructors, Saint John, Halifax, 
Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, Windsor, Winnipeg, Regina, 
Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton, and 
Vancouver, 367. 

labourers, Ottawa, 188. 

painters, Guelph, 827; Oshawa and Whitby. 
546; Ottawa, 546. 

plasterers, Halifax and Dartmouth, 1475; 
Ottawa, 546, 1663. 

plumbers, Belleville, 546; Halifax and 
Dartmouth, 1475; Kitchener and 
Waterloo, 546; Ottawa, 1476, 1663; 
Three Rivers, 1002; Welland, 1476; 
Windsor, 1476. 

plumbers and steamfitters, Windsor, 46. 

sheet metal workers, Halifax and Dart- 
mouth, 1475. 

sheet metal workers (construction). 
Ottawa, 18S: Port Arthur and Fort 
William, 1176. 

sprinkler fitters (plumbing and pipe- 
fitting industry), Canada, 46. 
Manufacturing — animal products — 

meat packing plant workers, Saskatoon, 
823. 
Manufacturing— fur and leather products— 

fur workers, Quebec, 1002; Toronto. 44. 

fur workers ( retail ), Montreal. 1174. 



INDEX 



Agreements — Con . 

Classification by Industries — Con. 

fur workers (wholesale) . Montreal, 368. 

glove factory workers (fine gloves), Prov- 
ince of Quebec, 369. 

glove factory workers (work gloves), Prov- 
ince of Quebec, 369. 

leather tannery workers, Province of 
Quebec, 48, 1174. 

shoe factory workers, Province of Quebec, 
1473, 1802; Toronto, 1305. 

shoe manufacturing workers, Batawa, 183. 

shoe repairers, Regina, 1476; Three Rivers, 
1473. 
Manufacturing- — metal products — 

agricultural implement factory workers, 
Chatham, 184. 

aluminum plant workers, Toronto, 1658. 

automobile body factory workers, Windsor, 
184. 

automobile manufacturing plant workers, 
Chatham, 542: Windsor, 542. 

automobile parts factory workers, Chat- 
ham, 688. 

brass products manufacturing workers, 
Toronto, 1800. 

electrical cable and wire factory workers, 
Leaside (Toronto), 542. 

electrical goods manufacturing workers, 
Leaside (Toronto), 1658. 

electrical products factory workers, Brock- 
ville, 1472; Montreal, 1471. 

garage and service station employees, 
Crow's Nest Pass Zone, 547; Megantic, 
1803; Montreal, 370; Quebec, 690. 

hardware manufacturing workers, Peter- 
borough, 687. 

machinery plant workers, Dundas, 999. 

metal fittings manufacturing workers, 
Oshawa, 183. 

metal products factory workers, Fort Erie, 
688; Hamilton, 1472; Toronto, 824. 

ornamental iron and bronze industry, 
Montreal, 49, 370. 

railway car and bus manufacturing 
workers, Montreal, 185, 543, 1307. 

sheet metal workers, Montreal, 49. 1660. 

steelworkers, Gananoque, 1172: Hamilton, 
1172: Lachine, 1172; Montreal. 1172. 

steel foundry workers, Owen Sound, 1173. 

steel plant workers, Hamilton, 542; Sydney, 
541. 

stove and electrical apparatus manufac- 
turing workers. Weston, 183. 

wire and cable plant workers, Guelph, 
1172. 
Manufacturing — miscellaneous wood 
products — 

furniture factory workers, Province of 
Quebec, 49, 370, 543, 1474. 

hard furniture factory workers, Province 
of Ontario, 1475. 

sash and door factory workers, Quebec, 
690, 1660. 
Manufacturing — non-metallic minerals, 
chemicals, etc. — 

building materials workers, Province of 
Quebec, 1660. 

cement manufacturing workers, St. Mary's. 
1800. 

chemical factory workers, Amherstburg, 
45. 

glass factory workers, Oshawa, 184. 

insulation manufacturing workers, Toronto, 
1659. 



Agreements — Con. 

Classification by Industries— Con. 

pharmaceutical factory workers, Toronto, 

1305; Windsor, 1801. 
Manufacturing — printing and publishing — 
paper handlers, Toronto, 45. 
printing trades, Montreal, 369, 543, 1803; 

Quebec, 1660, 1803. 
Manufacturing — pulp, paper and paper 

products — 
paper box factory workers (corrugated 

paper), Province of Quebec, 369. 
paper box factory workers (uncorrugated 

paper), Province of Quebec, 49, 369. 

1307, 1802. 
paper products workers, Ottawa, 824. 
pulp and paper makers, Ottawa, 45. 
pulp and paper mill workers, Hull, 45; 

Kapuskasing, 1800; Merritton, 367; 

Windsor Mills, 1799. 
Manufacturing — rubber products — 

rubber factory workers, Kitchener, 1470; 

St. Jerome, 999; Sarnia, 183. 
Manufacturing — shipbuilding — 

shipbuilding workers, Collingwood, 183; 

Sorel, 825. 
Manufacturing — textiles and clothing — 
embroidery industry, Montreal, 48, 1474. 
hosiery workers, Hamilton, 1305. 
knitting mill workers, Dunnville, 1171. 
men's and boys' clothing factory workers, 

Province of Quebec, 1174, 1306, 1474. 
millinery workers, Montreal, 369; Prov- 
ince of Quebec, 1307. 
textile workers, Cornwall, 367; Guelph, 

1658; Valleyfield, 824. 
women's cloak and suit factory workers, 

Province of Quebec, 48; Winnipeg, 

1470. 
Manufacturing — tobacco and liquors — 
cigar factory workers, Montreal, 1171. 
distillery workers, New Westminster, 541. 
tobacco factory workers, Hamilton, 1304, 

1657 (correction) ; Montreal, 1304. 
Manufacturing — vegetable foods, etc. — 

bakers, Edmonton, 1663; Lethbridge. 827. 
bakery employees, Montreal, 185; Three 

Rivers, 826. 
bakery salesmen, Lethbridge, 828. 
cereal mill workers, Peterborough, 1799. 
confectionery factory workers, Toronto, 

1304. 
flour mill workers, Keewatin, 44. 
food packing workers (yeast, tea and 

coffee), Ville LaSalle, 999. 
Mining, non-ferrous smelting and quarrying 

— coal — 
coal miners, Vancouver Island, 687. 
Mining, non-ferrous smelting and quarrying 

— metal — 
iron miners, Steep Rock Lake, 366. 
metal miners. Britannia Beach, 44; Hedley, 

823; Kimberley and Chapman Camp, 

1470; Kirkland Lake, 1657; Noranda, 

823: Sherridon, 366; Yellowknife, 

N.W.T., 1657. 
metal workers, Flin Flon, 366. 
Mining, non-ferrous smelting and quarrying 

— othei — 
iron oxide miners, Red Mill, 368. 
Mining, non-ferrous smelting and quarrying 

— quarrying — 
building materials workers, Province of 

Quebec, 1660. 



INDEX 



Agreements — Con. 
Classification by Industries — Con. 
Service — business and personal — 

barbers, Aylmer, 189; Chatham, 189; 

Lindsay, 189; Prescott, Cardinal, 

Iroquois and Morrisburg, 188; Prov- 
ince of Saskatchewan, 1476, 1663. 
barbers and hairdressers, Hull, 51; 

Quebec, 51; Rouyn and Noranda, 51; 

St. Hyacinthe, 51. 
hairdressers, Montreal, 371, 826. 
hotel and restaurant employees, Van- 
couver, 47. 
Service — professional establishments — 

hospital and charitable institution 

employees, Quebec district, 51; Sher- 

brooke, 51. 
Service — public administration — 

firefighters, Quebec, 1474; Sherbrooke, 545. 
municipal office employees (permanent), 

Sherbrooke, 545. 
policemen, Quebec City, 187, 1804. 
Trade— 

dairy employees, Quebec, 826. 

garage and service station employees, 

Crow's Nest Pass Zone, 547; Megantic, 

1803; Montreal, 370; Quebec, 690. 
hardware and paint trade, Quebec, 50, 

1308. 
retail food stores, Quebec, 826. 
retail stores, Chicoutimi, 1308; Granby, 

1175; Megantic, 1175; St. Hyacinthe, 

51. 
trade and office employees, Arvida, 

Jonquiere and St. Joseph d'Alma, 

1309. 
wholesale food stores, Quebec, 1804. 
Transportation and Public Utilities 

— electric raihvays and local bus 

lines — 
street railway employees, British Columbia, 

825; Ottawa, 184. 
Transportation and Public Utilities 

— electricity and gas — 
gas workers, Toronto, 1173. 
Transportation and Public Utilities 

— local and highway transport — 
truck drivers, Montreal Island, 545. 
Transportation and Public Utilities 

— local transport — 
taxicab drivers, Toronto, 188. 

Transportation and Public Utilities 

— water — 
checkers and coopers (ocean navigation), 

Montreal, 1308. 
longshoremen (ocean and inland), Sorel, 

826. 
longshoremen (ocean navigation), Montreal, 

1175. 
marine engineers (deepsea dry cargo 

freight vessels), East and West Coast, 

1000. 
marine officers (deepsea dry cargo freight 

vessels), East and West Coast, 1000. 
radio officers (deepsea dry cargo freight 

vessels), East and West Coast, 1001. 
seamen (deepsea dry cargo freight vessels), 

East and West Coast, 999. 
shipliners, etc., Vancouver, 46. 
shipliners (ocean navigation), Montreal, 

1308. 



Agreements — Con. 

Agreements Resulting from Proceedings 
under The Wartime Labour Rela- 
tions Regulations: — 

Alberta Wheat Pool, Vancouver, and em- 
ployees, 1609. 

Arctic Ice Company, Limited, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 1137. 

Biltmore Hats Limited, Guelph, and em- 
ployees, 536. 

British American Oil Company, Limited, 
Moose Jaw, and employees, 41. 

British Columbia Motor Transportation Lim- 
ited, Vancouver, and employees, 41. 

Canadian Line Materials Limited, Scarboro 
Junction, and employees, 42. 

Canadian Ohio Brass Company, Limited, 
Niagara Falls, and employees, 334. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Britt, 
Ont., and employees (coal dock), 1609. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Little 
Current, Ont., and employees (coal 
dock), 1609. 

Canadian Vickers, Limited, Montreal, and 
employees, 1789 (settlement reached). 

City Laundry Limited, Saint John, and 
employees, 960. 

Clarke Steamship Company, Limited, Mont- 
real, and employees, 1451. 

Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company, 
Limited (Con Property), Yellowknife, 
N.W.T., and employees, 667. 

Crescent Creamery Limited, City Dairy Lim- 
ited, Modern Dairies Limited, St. 
Boniface Creamery, Limited, and Cen- 
tral Dairies, Limited, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 960. 

Dominion Wheel and Foundries Limited, St. 
Boniface, and employees, 960. 

Drumheller Coal Operators' Association, 
Drumheller, and employees, 536. 

Eleven painting contractors, Saint John, and 
employees, 799. 

Giant Yellowknife Gold Mines Limited, Yel- 
lowknife, N.W.T., and employees, 960. 

Great West Saddlery Company, Limited, Win- 
nipeg, and employees., 536. 

Grosch Felt Shoe Company, Stratford, and 
employees, 334. 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Limited, Toronto, 
and employees, 334. 

Halifax Shipyards Limited (Halifax and 
Dartmouth plants), and employees, 172. 

Thos. Jackson and Sons, Limited, Winnipeg, 
and employees, 1137. 

Keystone Transports Limited, Montreal, and 
employees, 172. 

Lakehead Terminal Elevators Association, 
Fort William and Port Arthur, 1276. 

Magazine Digest Publishing Company, Lim- 
ited, and employees, 667. 

McCurdy Supply Company, Limited, Win- 
nipeg, and employees, 1137. 

Modern City Dairy, Sydney, and employees, 
799. 

Municipality of St. Clements, Manitoba, and 
employees, 334. 

J. S. Nairn, Sydney, and employees, 1137. 

National Harbours Board (grain elevators at 
Montreal and Quebec, and cold storage 
plant at Montreal), and employees, 
1137. 

Newfoundland Railway, St. John's, and 
emplovees (clerical staff. North Sydney, 
N.S.), 1789. 



INDEX 



Agreements — Con, 

Agreements Resulting from Proceedings 
under The Wartime Labour Rela- 
tions Regulations: — Con. 

Oshawa Railway Company (C.N.R.), and 
employees, 127 | 6. 

Olympia Wholesale, Brandon, and employees, 
799. 

Picardy Limited, Winnipeg, and employees., 
7-99. 

Toronto Broadcasting Company (Station 
CKEY), Toronto, and employees, 173. 

Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway, and 
employees, 667. 

Township of Tisdale, South Porcupine, and 
employees (general workers), 178. 

United Grain Growers' Terminals, Limited, 
Vancouver, and employees, 1609. 

Universal Fruit Company, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 960. 

Various steamship companies (Shipping 
Federation of Canada), and employees, 
667. 

Frank Waterhouse Company, Vancouver, and 
employees, 334. 

Weidman Brothers, Limited, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 173. 

Well and Vale Manufacturing Company, St. 
Catharines, and employees, 42. 

Welton-Malmgren Manufacturing Company, 
Limited, Winnipeg, and employees, 536. 

Western Canadian Greyhound Lines Limited, 
Calgary, and employees, 173. 

Western Rawhide and Harness Manufactur- 
ing Company, St. Boniface, and em- 
ployees, 42. 

Wheat City Dairy, Brandon, and employees, 
536. 

Winnipeg Electric Company, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 173. 

Agricultural Implements : 

Canada — 

wage rates, hours and working conditions in 
the agricultural implements industry, 
1532, 1535. 

Agriculture : 

co-operation between Canada and United 

States in harvesting of crops, 1760. 
exchange of harvesting units between Can- 
ada and United States, 775. 
farm accidents in Canada and United 

States, 1888. 
Canada — 
man-power situation in 1946, 648, 652. 
continuation of farm labour program, 487. 
farm income during 1946, 487. 
activities of Canadian Mission appointed to 

select Polish veterans, 1750. * 
immigration of Polish veterans to work on 

farms, 628. «" 
Polish veterans permitted to purchase or 

rent own farms, 1757. 
admission of workers from Europe for 

employment in sugar beet industry, 

629. - 
survey of farm accidents, 1888. 
non-fatal accidents and fires — D.B. of S. 

survey on farm accidents, 1887. 
recommendation of C.C. of L. re farm 

prices, 1585. 
Man.: re establishment of joint organization 

of labour and farmers, 1412. 
United Kingdom: statistics re distribution of 

man-power, 508; production program 

for 1947, 509. 



Agriculture — Con. 

U.S.A.: survey of farm accidents, 1888; report 
on labour supply in Southern states, 18; 
support of adequate minimum wage 
and old age security for farm workers 
pledged by A.F. of L., 1774. 

Agriculture, Department of: 

annual survey of credit unions (1946), 
1889. 

Air: 

U.S.A.— 

Clean Air (Removal of Dusts) — summary 
of pamphlet issued by Department of 
Labour, 835. 

Alberta Federation of Labour: 

convention proceedings, 258-59. 

Algoma Steel Corporation: 

issues memorandum on reinstatement of 
war veterans, 915. 

Allowances : 

Canada — 

military allowances (1938-1946) as shown 
in D.B. of S. report on national income, 
311. 

tabular report on number of university 
student veterans receiving D.V.A. 
allowances, 65. 

number of veterans receiving "awaiting 
returns" grants and payments made 
under Veterans' Rehabilitation Act in 
1946, 915. 
United Kingdom: payment of prolonged ser- 
vice abroad allowances to merchant 
seamen under agreements negotiated by 
National Maritime Board, 633. 

See also Children's Allowances; Family 
Allowances; Out-of-Work Benefits. 

Alternative Remedies: 

See Committee _ on Alternative Remedies 
(United Kingdom). 

American Federation of Labour: 

sixty-sixth annual convention, 1773. 

A.F. of L. and CIjO. discuss labour unity, 

636. 
tabular report on union membership and 

local unions in Canada classified *by 

affiliation, 1261. 
number of union representation votes in 

1946, 635. 
extracts from address of Leo George, frater- 
nal delegate to convention of T. and 

L.C., 1570. 
requests for arbitrators during 1946, 638. 
correction re fraternal delegates to British 

Trades Union Congress (1946), 127. 

American Standards Association: 

Safety Code for Equipment in Baking In- 
dustry, 1758. 

Amputees : 

See Handicapped Workers. 

Amusements : 

Alta.— 

amendment in Act re licensing of motion 

picture machine operators, 839. 
Man.: new regulations under Minimum Wage 

Act governing places of amusement, 552. 

Annual Reports : 

See Labour Departments and Bureaus; 
various subject headings. 



▼iii 



INDEX 



Annuities : 

Canada — 

group pension plans, issued by Annuities 

Branch, Department of Labour, 488. 
revised pension plan of Bristol-Myers Com- 
pany of Canada, Limited, 1094. 
establishment of government scheme re- 
quested by T. and L.C., 1575. 
Man.: amendment in Municipal Act providing 

pension for municipal officials, 1023. 
U.S.A.: number of workers covered by an- 
nuity policies, 1090. 

Anti-Labour Legislation: 

U.S.A.— 

resolution adopted by C.I.O., 1776. 

Apprenticeship : 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Coal Mining, 1118. 

Canada — 

apprentice requirements of construction 
industry — report of Committee on 
Apprenticeship, Canadian Construction 
Association, 631. 
statement presented, and resolution adopted, 
at Joint National Conference of the 
Construction Industry, 299-300. 
report of Director of C.V.T., 1671. 
report of conference of Regional Directors 

of C.V.T., 1674. 
veterans urged to complete C.V.T., 915. 
supervision of apprentices under C.V.T., 

1674. 
establishment of National Apprenticeship 
Plan requested by T. and L.C., 497; 
remarks of Minister of Labour, 498. 

Alta.: regulations under Apprenticeship Act 
(1944), 1333; new regulations under 
Act governing motor vehicle repair 
trade, 196-97; radio technician desig- 
nated as trade under Act, 696; recom- 
mendations of Federation of Labour, 
259. 

B.C.: order under Male Minimum Wage Act, 
1816. 

Man.: tailors designated as trade under Act, 
84'5; administration of Act during 1946 
reviewed in anual report of Depart- 
ment of Labour, 620'. 

N.B.: apprenticeship training under Depart- 
ment of Labour during 1946, 1894. 

Ont.: servicing and installing air-conditioning 
or refrigerating equipment designated 
as trade under Act, 553. 

Que.: provisions of Apprenticeship Act 
(1045), 1687; new apprenticeship reg- 
ulations under Electricians and Elec- 
trical Installations Act, 1817; incor- 
poration of Apprenticeship Commission 
for building and engineering construc- 
tion trades of Joliette, under Appren- 
ticeship Assistance Act, 380. 

Sask.: regulations under Apprenticeship Act 
(1044), 1335h36; provisions of Act, 
200-261; regulations under Act govern- 
ing barbering and beauty culture, 61; 
annual report of Apprenticeship 
Branch, Department of Labour (1946). 
769. 



Arbitration: 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Inland Transport, 1121. 

Canada — 
provision of proposed Industrial Relations 

and Disputes Investigation Act, 936. 
arbitration award of Hon. Mr. Justice 
C. P. McTague in meat packing dispute, 
1753, 1791-96. 
grievance procedure provided under agree- 
ment making employees of lumber firm 
liable for illegal strikes, 911. 
Bill to provide for the Investigation, Con- 
ciliation and Settlement of Industrial 
Disputes, not passed, 1328. 

Alta.: provisions of new Labour Act (con- 
solidation of Industrial Conciliation 
and Arbitration Act, etc.), 837, 843. 

B.C.: provisions of Industrial Conciliation 
and Arbitration Act (1947), 1013, 1016; 
trade union coming within Industrial 
Conciliation and Arbitration Act ruled 
legal entity, 1247; validity of Indus- 
trial Conciliation and Arbitration Act 
upheld in Supreme Court, 1819. 

Que.: activities of Conciliation and Arbitra- 
tion Service during 1945-46, 1685; 
activities reviewed in annual report of 
Department of Labour (19-45), 117. 

Ont.: provisions of Fire Departments Act 
and Police Act, 841. 

Australia: standard hours reduced to forty 
— award of Commonwealth Court of 
Conciliation and Arbitration, 1596-1600; 
resolution adopted by Conference of 
Commonwealth and state labour min- 
isters re arbitration awards in fac- 
tories, shops and offices, 1822; reduc- 
tion of industrial disputes through 
established system of conciliation and 
arbitration, urged at tripartite indus- 
trial conference, 1416. 

New Zealand: secret ballot before striking 
required of trade unionists in amend- 
ment to Industrial Conciliation and 
Arbitration Act, 1759. 

Italy: mediation machinery established in all 
plants — compulsory creation of factory 
commissions, 1250. 

U.S.A.: enactment of legislation to curb 
jurisdictional disputes, 1414; increase 
of voluntary arbitration during 1946, 
638; arbitration procedure established 
in building trades, 282; recommenda- 
tions of Labour-Management Advisory 
Committee, 10; compulsory arbitration 
in certain states, provided by legisla- 
tion governing public utilities, 1414; 
compulsory arbitration in public util- 
ities in Indiana and New Jersey, 638; 
legislation governing public utilities in 
New Jersey, 62, in New York state, 
62. 
See also Conciliation; Legal decisions; War- 
time Labour Relations Regulations. 

Armed Forces : 

Canada — 

review of man-power situation in 1946, 648, 

649. 
report (with table) on use of rehabilitation 

aids and N.E.S. offices, 63, 64. 
See also Veterans. 

Associated Medical Services Incorporated: 

review of activities, 1170. 



INDEX 



ix 



Australia : 

standard hours reduced to forty — award of 
Commonwealth Court of Conciliation 
and Arbitration, 1596-1600. 

agenda before Conference of Commonwealth 
and state labour ministers, 1822. 

referendum on social services, employment 
conditions and marketing, 286. 

conclusions of tripartite industrial confer- 
ence held to establish industrial pro- 
gram to increase production, 1415. 

high level of employment indicated in 
report, 919. 

policy of Joint Coal Board established to 
■administer measures to remedy condi- 
tions in coal industry in New South 
Wales, 1416. 

forty-hour week in New South Wales, 1249. 

Austria : 

re-admission to I.L.O., 1594. 

Automobile Industry : 

production and employment in automobile 
i n d u s t r y — report of International 
Labour Office presented at second ses- 
sion of I.L.O. Industrial Committee, 
1770. 
Canada — 

study (with charts and tables) on seasonal 
variations of employment in the auto- 
mobile and parts industry, 287-92. 

recommendation of C.C. of L., 1585. 
U.S.A.: first guaranteed annual wage plan in 
automobile industry secured by U.A.W., 
77'7; report on successful bonus plans 
drafted by U.A.W. and certain 
employers, 919; pension plan estab- 
lished, and wage increases granted at 
Ford Motor Company, 920; pension 
plan rejected by Ford Motor Company 
workers, 1758. 

Awaiting Returns: 

definition, 915. 
Canada — 

report (with table) on number of veterans 
awaiting returns under Post-Discharge 
Re-establishment Order during period 
October, 1945, to October, 1946, 63, 64. 

number of veterans receiving grants and 
payments made under Veterans Rehab- 
. ilitation Act in 1946, 915. 

decline in benefits awarded to veterans, 
213, 558. 

Baby Bonus: 

See Children's Allowances; Family Allow- 
ances. 

Baking Industry : 

B.C.— 

regulation 17B under Hours of Work Act 
re overtime, 1817. 
U.S.A.: Safety Code for Equipment in Baking 
Industry, 1758. 

Bank of Canada: 

labour representation on Board of Direc- 
tors requested by C.C. of L., 1585. 

Banking : 

Canada — 
establishment of government owned and 
controlled banking system urged by 
C.C. of L., 1585. 



Barbers : 

Sask.— 

inclusion of barbering as trade under 
Apprenticeship Act, 61. 

Beauty Culture: 

Sask. — 

inclusion as trade under Apprenticeship 
Act, 61. 
Beet Industry: 

See Sugar Beet Industry. 

Belgium: 

proceedings of National Conference of 

Labour, 1605. 
study on collective agreements, 1124. 

Bell Telephone Company of Canada: 

company's health program for its employees, 
1815. 

Bender, Frank, Congress of Industrial 

Organizations : 
extracts from address at convention of 
C.C. of L., 1578. 

Benefits: 

•Canada — 

report on "benefit years" under Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Act, issued by D.B. of 
S., 1042. 

unemployment insurance contributions and 
benefits for veterans, 1812. 

report (with table) on number of veterans 
receiving benefits under Post-Discharge 
Re-establishment Order during period 
October, 1945 to October, 1946, 63, 64. 
U.S.A.: unemployment benefits denied when 
open shop employment refused, 125; 
sickness benefits for railroad workers 
provided under government insurance 
program, 638; unemployment benefits 
denied strikers in state of Michigan, 
1324. 

Bengough, Percy R., President, Trades and 
Labour Congress of Canada: 

summary of submission to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
1104. 

presents brief at meeting of Standing Com- 
mittee on Immigration and Labour, 
781. 

reviews history of Ottawa Allied Trades 
and Labour Association at fiftieth 
anniversary celebration, 1248. 

extracts from New Year's message, 1, 2; 
from Labour Day message, 1242; from 
convention address, 1568. 

presents legislative proposals of T. and 
L.C., 494. 

Beverages : 

Ont.— 

regulations under Liquor Licence Act, 200. 

Bevin, Rt. Hon. Ernest, Foreign Secretary 
(United Kingdom): 
extracts from address at convention of 
T.U.C., 1589. 

Bill of Rights: 

Canada — 

introduction advocated by C.C. of L., 1584. 
Sask.: provisions of Bill of Rights, 1495. 
U.S.A.: establishment of economic bill of 
rights urged by C.I.O., 1776. 



6384—2 



INDEX 



Bisson, J. G., Chairman, Unemployment In- 
surance Commission : 
extracts from address at convention of 
C.C.C.L., 1587. 

Blind Persons: 

Canada — 

financial and statistical summary concern- 
ing old age and blind pensioners as at 
December 31. 1946, 271; as at March 
31, 1947, 763; as at June 30, 1947, 
1404; as at September 30, 1947, 1890. 
new regulations under Old Age Pensions 

Act, 1497. 
amendment to Old Age Penusions Act re 
amounts payable and eligibility require- 
ments, 914. 
Dominion-provincial old age and blind pen- 
sions agreements, 1409-10. 
report on administration of old age and 
blind pensions by Department of 
National Health and Welfare, 775. 

Alia.: regulations under Bureau of Public 
Welfare Act governing blind pen- 
sioners, 1497; hospital services for old 
age and blind persons, provided under 
Act, 839. 

Man.: new and amended provisions of Old 
Age and Blind Persons' Pensions Act, 
1022; legislative resolutions re old age 
and blind persons' pensions defeated, 
1023. 

Que.: general report of Old Age and Blind 
Pensions Commissions, 117. 

Sask.: amendment in Blind Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act (1945), 1492. 

Boilers : 

Alta.— 

amended regulations under Act, 551. 

B.C.: regulations under Boiler Inspection Act, 
1334; amendments in Act, 1019. 

Que.: inspection during 1945-46, 1687. 

Sask.: new regulations under Steam Boilers 
Act governing safe handling of liquefied 
petroleum gas, 1499; amendments in 
Act, 1494; annual report of Steam 
Boilers Branch, Department of Labour 
(1946), 770. 

Bonus : 

Canada — 

number of establishments in wooden furni- 
ture industry providing production or 
incentive bonuses, 1386. 

time-limit for application extended under 
Merchant Seamen Special Bonus Order, 
196. 
U.S.A.: report on successful bonus plans 
drafted by U.A.W. and certain employ- 
ers, 919; extent of non-production 
bonuses in 1945-46, 1781. 

See also Child Welfare: Family Allowances; 
Incentive Wage Plans. 

Boot and Shoe Industry: 

United Kingdom — 

recommendations of Boot and Shoe Working 
Party, 156. 

Bowling Alleys : 

Man. — 

regulations under Minimum Wage Act 
governing male and female pinsetters, 
552. 



Brewery Products: 

Canada — 

wages, hours and working conditions in the 
brewery products industry (1946), 994. 

Bristol-Myers Company of Canada, 
Limited : 

revised pension plan, 1094. 

British North America Act: 

amendment urged in resolution of Saskat- 
chewan legislature, 1496. 

British Trades Union Congress: 

proceedings of 79th conference, 1588. 
extracts from address of Lord Dukeston, 

fraternal delegate to convention of T. 

and L.C., 1570. 

Broadcasting: 

Canada — 

government ownership of radio broadcasting 

urged by C.C. of L., 1585. 
resolution adopted at convention of T. and 
L.C., 1575. 
U.S.A.: Court rules Lea Act ("anti-Petrillo" 
Law), unconstitutional, 285. 

Brown, Robert, International Printing Press- 
men and Assistants' Union (T. and 

L. C): 
extracts from address at convention of 
A.F. of L., 1774. 

Buckley, John, Acting Secretary-Treasurer, 

Trades and Labour Congress of 

Canada : 
appointment, 490. 
presents minutes of early labour meetings 

to Dominion Department of Labour, 

1247. 
remarks at meeting of Standing Committee 

on Immigration and Labour, 782. 
presents financial report at convention of 

T. and L.C., 1572. 

Budget: 

See Finance. 

Building and Construction Industry: 

immigration of workers from displaced per- 
sons camps, 1407. 

first meeting of building, civil engineering 
and public works committee of I.L.O., 
in Brussels, 142. 

submission of resolution of Industrial 
Committee to Governments and United 
Nations, authorized by Governing Body 
of I.L.O., 787. 
Canada — 

decrease in housing activity in 1947, 954. 

employment and investments in construc- 
tion industry in 1947, 911 . 

report on production outlook for basic and 
building materials, 505. 

new housing completed in 1946 — statistical 
report of D.B. of S., 629. 

increase in wage rate index in 1946, 771. 

wage rates in the construction industry 
(1946), 890-92. 

man-power situation in 1946, 654. 

exchange of building tradesmen, advocated 
by Minister of Labour. 629. 

labour relations in the construction 
industry, 631. 

apprentice requirements in construction 
industry, 631. 



INDEX 



Building and Construction Industry — Con. 

Timing of Puolie Investment in Construc- 
tion — text of paper presented by 
Coordinator of Public Projects, 
Department of Reconstruction and 
Supply, 128. 

conference proceedings of Joint National 
Conference of the Construction Indus- 
try, 298. 

recommendation of C.C. of L., 1585. 

Alta.: regulations under Labour Act (Holi- 
days with Pay Order No. 6) governing 
holidays in the construction industry, 
1334; amendments to Order, 1682. 

Man.: annual report of Department of 
Labour (1946), 621. 

United Kingdom: statistics re distribution of 
man-power, 5'0'S ; production program 
for 1947, 509; conciliation machinery in 
building industry, 791-92; agreement 
for public holidays with pay in build- 
ing and civil engineering contracting 
industries, 1414; recommendations of 
T.U.C., 1589. 

U.S.A.: decrease in housing activity in 1947, 
954; arbitration procedure established 
in building trades, 282>; comprehensive 
insurance plan for New York metal 
workers, 778. 

Bureau of Technical Personnel: 

geographical distribution of professional 
openings in Canada, 1564. 

survey of professional openings — future 
employment opportunities for univer- 
sity-trained personnel, 1093. 

report (with charts) on employment trends 
in the professions, 1419. 

See also Wartime Bureau of Technical 
Personnel. 

Burford, W. T., Secretary-Treasurer, Cana- 
dian Federation of Labour: 
summary of submission to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
1106. 

Burns and Company, Limited: 

arbitration award of Hon. Mr. Justice 
C. P. McTague, in meat packing dis- 
pute, 1753, 1791-96. 

Calendar: 

See World Calendar. 

"Canada": 

publication of 1947 edition by D.B. of S., 
632. 

Canada Labour Relations Board: 

proposed establishment to administer Part 
I of Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act, 926, 938, 940; sub- 
mission of C.C. of L. to House of 
Commons Industrial Relations Com- 
mittee, 1103. 

Canada Packers Limited: 

arbitration award of Hon. Mr. Justice 
C. P. McTague in meat packing dis- 
pute. 1753, 1791-96. 



Canada Shipping Act: 

surcharge on pilotage dues in district of 
British Columbia, 696; in Quebec and 
Montreal districts, 696; in St. Law- 
rence-Kingston-Ottawa pilotage district, 
843. 

amendment in Act requested by C.C. of L., 
1585. 

recommendations of T. and L.C., 496, 1575. 

Canadian and Catholic Confederation of 
Labour : 

proceedings of 25th annual convention, 1586. 

Dominion legislative program, 501. 

tabular report on union membership and 
local unions in Canada classified by 
affiliation, 1261. 

number of agreements of affiliated unions, 
containing union security provisions, 
134-35. 

statement on Industrial Relations Bill, No. 
338 (Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act), 93*0. 

summary of submission to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
1165. 

extracts from President's New Year's mes- 
sage, 2; from Labour Day message, 
1244. 

Canadian Bill of Rights: 

See Bill of Rights. 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: 

report of C.C. of L. convention Committee 
on Education and Publicity, 1585. 

resolution adopted at convention of T. and 
L.C., 1575. 

Canadian Chamber of Commerce: 

summary of submission to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
1106. 

Canadian Congress of Labour: 

proceedings of seventh annual convention, 

1576. 
Dominion legislative program, 408. 
extracts from President's New Year's mes- 
sage, 2; from Labour Day message, 

1242. 
statement on Industrial Relations Bill, No. 

338 (Industrial Relations and Disputes 

Investigation Act), 929. 
summary of submissions to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 

1102, 1105. 
views on immigration presented at meeting 

of Standing Committee on Immigration 

and Labour, 782. 
statement of wage policy, 636. 
assails dual loyalty of Communist unions, 

1098. 
tabular report on union membership and 

local unions in Canada classified by 

affiliation, 1261. 
number of agreements of affiliated unions 

containing union security provisions, 

134-35. 

Canadian Construction Association: 

apprentice requirements of construction 

industry, 631. 
labour relations in construction industry, 

631. 



6384— 2* 



INDEX 



Canadian Co-operative Union: 

convention, 278. 

Canadian Corps of Commissionaires: 

assistance in rehabilitation of older veter- 
ans, 630. 

Canadian Federation of Labour: 

tabular report on union membership and 
local unions in Canada classified by 
affiliation, 1261. 

summary of submission to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
1106. 

Canadian Federation of the Blind: 

Sask.— 

amendment in Blind Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act (1945), re jurisdiction 
of, 1492. 

Canadian Ingersoll-Rand Company. 
Limited : 

job evaluation plan, 1097. 

Canadian Institute of Mining and Metal- 
lurgy : 

The Department of Labour and the Mining 
Industry — address by Deputy Minister 
of Labour at annual convention of 
Institute, 119. 

Canadian Manufacturers' Association : 

annual meetings, 1114. 

summary of submission to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
1106. 

Canadian Maritime Commission : 

re appointment, 1093. 
functions, 1325. 

Canadian Mission to Select Polish Veterans: 

activities, 1750. 

Canadian Mutual Aid Board: 

summary of final report, 490. 

Canadian National-Canadian Pacific Act 
(1933): 

amendment, 1093. 

provisions of new section, 1325. 

Canadian National Committee on Refugees: 

summary of evidence presented before 
Senate Standing Connnittee on Immi- 
gration and Labour, 1109. 

Canadian National Institute for the Blind: 

Sask.— 

amendment in Blind Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act (1945) re jurisdiction of, 
1492. 

Canadian National Railways: 

settlement of dispute over vacations with 
pay for railway employees, 1561. 

summary of evidence before Senate Stand- 
ing Committee on Immigration, 1108. 

section added to Canadian National-Cana- 
dian Pacific Act (1933), 1325. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company: 

settlement of dispute over vacations with 
pay for railway employees, 1561. 

section added to Canadian National-Cana- 
dian Pacific Act (1933), 1325. 



Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment 
No. 1: 

summary of decisions, 182, 1162, 1796. 

Canadian Seamen's Union: 

agreement reached in Great Lakes shipping 
dispute, 1247. 

Canadian Standards Association: 

prepares code of work practices for window 
cleaners, 775. 

Canadian Vocational Training: 

annual report, 1566. 

statement of Minister of Labour on use of 

training by veterans, 1756. 
training-on-the-job opportunities for veter- 
ans discovered by N.E.S., 120. 
staff training program in Dominion Civil 

Service, 1246, 
job orientation training — induction pro- 
gram for government employees, 489. 
reorganization of training centres, 1477. 
transfer of training to D.V.A. discussed at 

conference of Vocational Training 

Advisory Council, 1671; remarks of 

Brigadier Lyon, Assistant Director, 

C.V.T., 1672. 
assistance to vocational schools under 

Dominion-provincial agreement, 1478. 
re-establishment of ex-service women in 

western provinces, 384. 
veterans urged to complete C.V.T., 915. 
booklet on Vocational and Pre-Matricula- 

tion Training of Canada's Veterans, 

issued by Department of Labour, 914. 
eighth meeting of Vocational Training 

Advisory Council, 854-57; conference 

of, 1670. 
conference of Regional Directors, 1673. 
Ontario regional conference, 67. 
statistical summaries, 66, 208, 384, 560, 712, 

1031, 1189, 1477. 
enrolment statistics, 66, 208, 384, 560-61, 

1031-33, 1189, 1477-78. 
enrolment of veterans. 66, 67, 560, 561, 

1031-33, 1189, 1477-78. 
contraction of training facilities, 212, 1189. 
correspondence courses, 67, 210, 212, 384, 

561, 1031, 1033, 1189, 1478. 
enrolment in C.V.T. schools, 67, 212, 560-61, 

1031-33, 1189, 1478. 
on-the-job-training (training in industry), 

66. 67. 209, 212, 384. 560-61, 850, 1031- 

33, 1189, 1477-78, 1674. 
pre-matriculation classes, 66, 208, 210. 384, 

560, 561, 712, 1031, 1189, 1478, 1674. 
supervision of apprentices, 1674. 
training of ex-service women, 66, 07. 209-11. 

384, 3S5, 856, 1031, 1478. 
training of linesmen, 1674. 
training for industrial supervisors and 

foremen, 66, 67, 713. 

Cancer: 

Canada — 

establishment of clinics for research work 

requested by C.C. of L., 1<5€ 
recommendation of T. and L.C. re Ontario 

Cancer Treatment and Research 

Foundation, 1575. 



INDEX 



Canteens : 

United Kingdom — 

meals for workers in British factories, 918. 
provision of canteens in all iron foundries 
recommended in report of Joint 
Advisory Committee, 1781. 

Cartels : 

Canada — 

annual report of proceedings under the 

Combines Investigation Act, 123. 
legislative recommendation of C.C.C.L., 502. 
legislative recommendation of C.C. of L., 

500. 

Cemetery Workers: 

See Hours of Labour. 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corpora- 
tion: 

report on housing activity during 1946>-47, 
954. 

Certification : 

Canada — 

certification of company dominated unions 
prohibited under proposed Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation 
Act, 927. 

provisions of Industrial Relations Bill, No. 
338 (Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act), 924; text of Bill, 
932; hearings of House of Commons 
Industrial Relations Committee, 1102-7. 

recommendation of C.M.A., 1114. 
B.C.: provisions of Industrial Conciliation 
and Arbitration Act (1947), 1015. 

Check-off : 

definition, 135. 

Canada — 

text of award of Hon. Mr. Justice C. P. 
McTague in meat packing industry, 
1793. 
agreements in fishing industry containing 

voluntary check-off clause, 1428, 1429. 
voluntary revocable check-off provided un- 
der agreement making employees of 
lumber firm liable for illegal strikes, 
911. 

N.S.: provisions of new Trade Union Act, 
1329. 

Que.: number of agremeents of C.C.C.L., 
T. and L.C., C.C. of L., and other 
unions, containing check-off provisions, 
135. 

U.S.A.: percentage of workers covered by 
check-off clauses in collective agree- 
ments, 636; number of workers covered 
by check-off provisions in 1946, 919; 
provisions of new agreements in coal 
mines, 1100; Rand formula provided 
in collective agreements covering em- 
ployees of Western Union Telegraph 
Company, 920. 

Chemicals Industry : 

United Kingdom — 

statistics re distribution of man-power, 508. 

Chemistry : 

U.S.A.— 

unionization of professional engineers and 
chemists, 10. 



Child Labour: 

application in Canada of conventions and 
recommendations adopted at 29th ses- 
sion of International Labour Confer- 
ence, 316. 
Canada — 

summary of 1947 publication of Provincial 
Labour Standards, 1266. 

recommendation of T. and L.C re factory 
machine operators, 1575. 
Que.: work permits issued during 1945-46, 

1687. 
U.S.A.: enforcement of Fair Labour Stan- 
dards Act and Public Contracts Act 
in 1946, 778; state laws on employment 
of children in Georgia, Massachusetts 
and New York, 62; improved legisla- 
tion sought by National Commission on 
Children and Youth, 283; resolution 
adopted by C.I.O., 1776. 

Child Welfare: 

Canada — 

administration of family allowances during 

1945-47, 1424. 
recommendation of T. and L.C. re factory 
machine operators, 1575. 
Man.: repeal of certain regulations governing 

mothers' allowances, 845. 
Ont.: increase in injuries to young workers, 
reported by I.A.P.A., 631. 

Children's Allowances: 

Canada — 

administration of family allowances during; 

1945-47, 1424. 
legislative recommendations of C.C.CjL.^ 
502. 

Chinese : 

Canada — 

repeal of Chinese Immigration Act, 1327. 

Citizens' Committees : 

Canada — 

functions, 386. 

Citizenship : 

Canada — 
granting of citizenship to Indians recom- 
mended by T. and L.C, 1575. 

Civil Engineering: 

See Engineering. 

Civil Rights: 

See Bill of Rights. 

Civil Service : 

Canada — 

health and working conditions of Federal 
Government employees investigated by 
Civil Service Health Division, Depart- 
ment of National Health and Welfare, 
489. 

establishment of Inter-departmental Com- 
mittee to study health insurance for 
Federal employees, 489. 

staff training program in Dominion Civil 
Service, 1246. 

job orientation training — induction program 
for government employees directed by 
C.V.T., 489. 

legislative recommendations of T. and L.C, 
497. 
U.S.A.: discharge of employee for communist 
sympathies upheld by Supreme Court, 
493. 



INDEX 



Civilian Labour Force: 

Canada — 
surveys directed by Dominion Bureau of 

Statistics, 727, 1350. 
man-power situation in 1946 (with table 

and chart), 648, 650, 651-56. 

Civilian Training: 

See Training. 

Clapham, Sir John, Chairman, Committee 
on Economic and Social Research 
(United Kingdom) : 
summary of report, 16. 

Classifications : 

See Occupational Classifications. 

Closed Shop : 

report of Committee of the Conference sub- 
mitted at thirtieth session of I.L.O., 
1592-93. 

definition, 135. 
Que.: number of agreements of C.C.C.L., T- 
and L.C., C.C. of L., and other unions, 
containing closed shop provisions, 135. 
U.S.A.: number of workers covered by closed 
shop contracts in 1946, 636, 919; valid 
closed shop contract ruled superior to 
re-employment rights by Federal dis- 
trict court, 493; outlawing of closed 
shop, etc., recommended by National 
Association of Manufacturers, 10; new 
measure bans closed shop in Arkansas 
and Tennessee, 282, 

See also Legal Decisions. 

Clothing Workers: 

Canada — 

union discipline and holiday and sick 
benefits established under recent col- 
lective agreements, 1411. 

immigration of workers from displaced 
persons camps, 1407. 
U.S.A.: simultaneous vacation period pro- 
vided, 1100; garment company estab- 
lishes annual wage plan, 637; officers' 
pension fund established by garment 
workers' union, 11; collective bargain- 
ing in needle trades, 658. 

Coal: 

second meeting of IjL.O. Industrial Com- 
mittee on Coal Mining, in Geneva, 
Switzerland, 138, 1116; Canadian par- 
ticipation, 788; resolutions adopted re 
proposed Coal Mineworkers' Charter, 
1119. 
Canada — 

proposed establishment of Dominion Coal 
Board, 1093. 

provisions of Dominion Coal Board Act 
and functions of Board, 1325. 

summary of report of Royal Commission 
on Coal, 302-10. 
N.S.: coal miners granted wage increase, 
1753; amendments in Coal Mines Regu- 
lation Act, 1331. 
Australia: policy of Joint Coal Board estab- 
lished to administer measures to remedy 
conditions in coal industry in New 
South Wales, 1416; increased coal pro- 
duction urged at tripartite industrial 
conference, 1415. 



Coal — Con. 

United Kingdom: five-day week in coal mines 
provided by agreement reached between 
miners and National Coal Board, 632; 
conciliation machinery in coal mining 
industry, 513; coal production under 
five-day week, 918; importance of coal 
production emphasized in White Paper 
on Economic Survey for 1947, 506, 508; 
production program for 1947, 509; 
improved lighting in coal mines — recom- 
mendation of Technical Advisory Com- 
mittee, 1444. 

U.S.A.: report on soft-coal strike — legal 
proceedings, termination, 9: provisions 
of new collective agreements in coal 
mines, 1099; collective bargaining in 
coal mining industry, 657; soft coal 
miners comply with Supreme Court 
mandate, 492: research on miners' 
diseases (silicosis, etc.), planned by 
U.M.W., 921. 

Collective Agreement Act (Quebec) : 

administration in 1945, 1685. 

activities under Act reviewed in annual 

report of Department of Labour (1945), 

116. 

Collective Agreements: 

See Agreements. 

Collective Bargaining : 

report of Committee of the Conference 
submitted at thirtieth session of I.L.O., 
1592-93. 

United Nations approves I.L.O. resolution 
on freedom of association, 1764. 

recommendations of Building, Civil Engin- 
eering and Public Works Committee of 
I.L.O., 145. 

resolution adopted by I.LjO. Industrial 
Committee on Inland Transport, 1121. 

report of International Labour Office to 
Industrial Committee on Iron and 
Steel, 1769. 
Canada — 

historical summary of Dominion and pro- 
vincial conciliation and collective bar- 
gaining legislation, 639-42. 

provisions of Industrial Relations Bill, No. 
338 (Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act), 923; text of Bill, 
931; hearings of House of Commons 
Industrial Relations Committee, 1102-7. 

present position with respect to labour rela- 
tions legislation — historical summary of 
Wartime Labour Relations Regulations, 
940. 

collective bargaining in the fishing industry 
(1947), 1426. 

collective agreement makes employees of 
lumber firm liable for illegal strikes, 
911. 

review of brochure on union-management 
co-operation at Lever Brothers Limi- 
ted, issued by Institute of Industrial 
Relations, University of Toronto, 632. 

recommendations of C.M.A., 1114. 
Alta.: resolution of Federation of Labour, 

259. 
B.C.: provisions of Industrial Conciliation 
and Arbitration Act (1947), 1013, 1016. 
N.S.: provisions of Fishermen's Federation 
Act, 1330; regulations under Trade 
Union Act, 1328, 1683. 



INDEX 



Collective Bargaining — Con. 

Ont.: enactment of Labour Relations Act, 
840; provisions of Fire Departments 
Act and Police Act concerning collec- 
tive bargaining and arbitration, 841. 

Que.: annual report of Department of Labour 
(1945), 1684. 

Sask.: regulations under Public Service Act 
(1947), 1492; amendments in Trade 
Union Act (1944), 1491. 

United Kingdom: conciliation machinery in 
building industry, 791, 792; five-day 
week in coal mines provided in agree- 
ment reached between miners and 
National Coal Board, 632. 

U.S.A.: changes in policy of N.L.R.B. re inter- 
pretation of Wagner Act, 490; trade 
union membership in 1946, 636; num- 
ber of workers covered by collective 
bargaining agreements in 1946, 919; 
provisions of new agreements in coal 
mines, 1100; admission policies of 
labour unions, 1267, bargaining rights 
of foremen upheld by Supreme Court, 
492, 556; dissolution of supervisory 
employees' union, 1100; enactment of 
Labour-Management Relations Act, 
943-48, President's message of dis- 
approval, 943; provisions of Labour- 
Management Relations Act in respect 
to bargaining representatives and elec- 
tions, 947; recommendation of Labour- 
Management Advisory Committee, 10; 
Rand formula provided in collective 
agreements covering employees of 
Western Union Telegraph Company, 
920; findings of survey on collective 
bargaining with employer groups, 657; 
unionization of professional engineers 
and chemists, 10; developments in 
union health and welfare plans, 1126; 
collective bargaining on pensions and 
compulsory retirement recommended by 
N.L.R.B., 284; program to promote 
collective bargaining urged by C.I.O., 
1770; recommendations of National 
Association of Manufacturers, 10; leg- 
islation governing public utilities in 
New Jersey, 62, in New York state, 62. 
See also Legal Decisions. 

Colour: 

Canada — 

use of colour to promote safety in factories, 
789. 

Combines Investigation Act: 

report of investigation into alleged combine 
in manufacture and sale of dental sup- 
plies in Canada, 1264. 

summary of Annual Report of Proceedings 
under the Combines Investigation Act 
for fiscal year ended March 31, 1946, 
123. 

inquiries of Commission into price decon- 
trol, 1408. 

Commerce : 

Canada — 

thirteenth report on organization in indus- 
try, commerce and the professions, 1413. 



Commercial Establishments : 

Que.— 

amended regulations under Industrial and 
Commercial Establishments Act re 
workers in compressed air, 1683; other 
amendments, 1025; inspection during 
1945-46, 1687. 

See also Hours of Work; Overtime. 

Commissionaires : 

Canada — 

functions of Canadian Corps of Commis- 
sionaires, 630. 

Committee on Alternative Remedies (Uni- 
ted Kingdom) 

established to consider alternative remedies 
of workmen's compensation and action 
for damages, 159-62. 

Communications : 

Canada — 

increase in wage rate index in 1946, 771. 

U.S.A.: agreement reached between Western 
Electric Company and Association of 
Communications Equipment Workers, 
778. 

Communism : 

Canada — 

outlawing of Communist Party recom- 
mended by C.C.C.L., 502; remarks of 
Minister of Labour, 502. 

C.C. of L. assails dual loyalty of Communist 
unions, 10O8; resolutions re interna- 
national affairs, 1578"79'; and freedom 
of trade unions, 1579. 

resolution on political affiliations of mem- 
bers, adopted at convention of T. and 
L.C., 1574. 
U.S.A.: discharge for communist sympathies 
upheld by Supreme Court, 493; dis- 
missal from government service of all 
known communists urged by A.F. of L., 
1774. 

Community Centres: 

Canada — 

continuation of, 280. 

Community Committees: 

Canada — 

Digest of reports of conferences issued by 
Ontario Rehabilitation Committee, 776. 

Community Youth Placement Centres: 

Canada — 

functions of centres established by N.E.S., 
642. 

Company Doctors: 

See Medical Services. 

Compensation : 

See Government Employees' Compensation 
Act; Seamen; Workmen's Compensa- 
tion. 

Complin, E. R., Chairman, Industrial Rela- 
tions Committee, CM. A.: 
summary of address at C.M.A. convention 
on Labour Legislation and Industrial 
Relations, 1115. 

Compulsory Arbitration : 

See Arbitration. 



INDEX 



Compulsory Collective Bargaining: 

See Collective Bargaining. 

Conciliation: 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Inland Transport, 1121. 
Canada — 

duties of conciliation officers under pro- 
posed Industrial Relations and Dis- 
putes Investigation Act, 933. 935; con- 
ciliation boards, 935-36, 939. 

historical summary of Dominion and pro- 
vincial conciliation and collective bar- 
gaining legislation, 639. 

Bill to provide for the Investigation, Con- 
ciliation and Settlement of Industrial 
Disputes, not passed, 1328. 
Alta: provisions of new Labour Act (Con- 
solidation of Industrial Conciliation 
and Arbitration Act, 837, 843. 
B.C.: provisions of Industrial Conciliation 
and Arbitration Act (1947), 1013, 1016; 
validity of Industrial Conciliation and 
Arbitration Act upheld in Supreme 
Court, 1819; trade union coming within 
Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration 
Act, ruled legal entity, 1247. 
N.S.: provisions of new Trade Union Act and 
repeal of Conciliation Service Act 
(1941), 1328; appointment of concilia- 
officers authorized under Fishermen's 
Federation Act, 1330. 

Que.: activities of Conciliation and Arbitra- 
tion Service during 1945-46, 1685 1 ; 
reviewed in annual report of Depart- 
ment of Labour (1945), 117. 

Sask.: annual report of Department of 
Labour (1946), 770. 

Australia: standard hours reduced to forty 
— award of Commonwealth Court of 
Conciliation and Arbitration, 1596- 
1600; resolution adopted by Conference 
of Commonwealth and state labour 
ministers, re arbitration awards in fac- 
tories, shops and offices, 1822; policy 
of Joint Coal Board established to 
administer measures to remedy con- 
ditions in coal industry in New South 
Wales, 1416; reduction of industrial 
disputes through established system of 
conciliation and arbitration urged at 
tripartite industrial conference, 1416. 

New Zealand: secret ballot before striking 
required of trade unionists in amend- 
ment to Industrial Conciliation and 
Arbitration Act, 1759. 

United Kingdom: conciliation machinery in 
building industry, 791, 792; in coal 
mining industry, 513. 

Italy: mediation machinery established in all 
plants — compulsory creation of factory 
commissions, 1250. 

U.S.A.: increase of voluntary arbitration dur- 
ing 1946, 638; Federal mediation 
service provided under Labour-Man- 
agement Relations Act, 944; enactment 
of legislation to curb jurisdictional 
disputes, 1414; appointment of panel 
of labour relations experts to serve as 
special conciliators in industrial dis- 
putes, 125; recommendations of Labour- 



Conciliation — Con. 
U.S.A.— Con. 

Management Advisory Committee, 10; 
compulsory arbitration in public 
utilities in Indiana and New Jersey, 
638; legislation governing public 
utilities in New Jersey, 62.; in New 
York state, 62. 
See also Legal Decisions; Wartime Labour 
Relations Regulations. 

Conciliation and Labour Act: 

monthly reports of conciliation activities 
of the Department of Labour under 
Act, 42, 176, 359, 539, 683, 819, 983, 
1156, 1296, 1467, 1654, 1790. 
review of legislation enacted in 1900, 639. 
Classification by Industries: 
Manufacturing — animal foods — 

food products workers, Winnipeg, 1296. 
Manufacturing — fur, leather and other animal 
products — 
leather products workers, Oshawa, 1157, 
1468. 
Manufacturing — metal products — 

jewellery products workers, Toronto, 177. 
metal products workers, Brantford, 684. 
steelworkers, Hamilton, 179; Ontario and 
Nova Scotia, 361. 
Manufacturing — non-metallic minerals, chem- 
icals, etc. — 
oil products workers, Petrolia, 43. 
Manufacturing — rubber products — 

rubber products workers, Bowmanville, 43, 

360. 
rubber workers, Welland, 684. 
Manufacturing — vegetable foods — 

food products workers, London, 1156. 
Mining — metal mining — 

metal miners, Bralorne, 1296. 
Mining — non-ferrous smelting and quarrying — 
coal miners, Fernie, 1161, 1468; Nova 
Scotia and New Brunswick, 177, 362, 
\ 684, 820; Province of Alberta, 984; 
^ Shaughnessy, 1468. 
Transportation and Public Utilities — elec- 
tricity and gas (mainly public util- 
ities) — 
public utility workers, York Township, 362. 
Transportation and Public Utilities — miscel- 
laneous — 
harbour workers, Halifax, 1656. 
Transportation and Public Utilities — water — 
deepsea shipping employees, East and West 

Coasts, 1655. 
freight handlers, Fort William and Port 

Arthur, 685. 
longshoremen, Montreal, 685, 1467. 
merchant seamen, Great Lakes, 820, 821, 
1157; Great Lakes and St. Lawrence 
River, 43; Montreal, 1161. 
unlicensed seamen. Great Lakes, 684; 
Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Water- 
ways, 1790. 



INDEX 



Conditions of Employment : 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Inland Transport, 1121. 
recommendations of Building Committee of 
I.L.O. for improved labour conditions 
in construction industry, 143. 
improved working conditions in textile 
mills recommended by Textiles Com- 
mittee of I.L.O. at meeting ic 
Brussels, 141. 
Canada — 
working conditions in certain industries: 
brewery products, 904. 
electrical machinery and apparatus, 1722. 
radio sets and parts, 1722. 
fishing, 1431, 1435, 1443, 
lumber and lumber products, 1374. 
manufacturing, 1750. 
meat products, li8'50*. 
edible plant products, 1850. 
motor vehicle parts and accessories, 1532. 
agricultural implements, 1532, 1535. 
pulp and paper, 988. 
rubber products, 1164. 
motor vehicles, 1169. 
increase in health programs in industry, 

1756. 
working conditions of coal miners described 
in report of Royal Commission on 
Coal, 303-4; outline of union organiza- 
tion in coal mines, 302. 
provisions of Act respecting the Hudson 
Bay Mining and Smelting Company, 
1326. 
working conditions of Polish girls at 
Dionne Spinning Mill Company, 629, 
1412. 
resolutions adopted by C.C. of L., 158U. 
Que.: report of Division of Industrial 

Hygiene (1941-1943), 1064. 
Australia: proposed amendment to Constitu- 
tion submitted to referendum, 286; 
policy of Joint Coal Board established 
to administer measures to remedy con- 
ditions in coal industry in New South 
Wales, 1410. 
New Zealand: results of study on eyestrain 

in industry, 127. 
N.W.T.: labour conditions in Yellowknife, 

1097. 
United Kingdom: increase in minimum wage 
and overtime rates, public holidays with 
pay, and reduction in work^week, for 
farm workers in England and Wales, 
1802; measures to improve working 
conditions in iron foundries recom- 
mended in report of Joint Advisory 
Committee, 1780; draft health and wel- 
fare regulations for the pottery indus- 
try issued under authority of Factories 
Act, 1752; provisions of agreements 
negotiated by National Maritime Board 
re post-war employment conditions in 
merchant ships, 633; appointment of 
Commission of Inquiry into wage struc- 
ture and methods of organization of 
work in cotton weaving industry, 8; 
improved lighting in coal mines — 
recommendation of Technical Advisory 
Committee, 1444. 
France: regulations to ensure safe working 
near dangerous machinery, 1417. 



Conditions of Employment — Con. 

U.S.A.: collective bargaining on pensions and 
compulsory retirement recommended by 
N.L.R.B., 284; improved living and 
working conditions of migratory 
workers recommended at National Con- 
ference on Labour Legislation, 207; 
recommendations of National Associa- 
tion of Manufacturers, 10; legislation 
enacted in New York state, 285-86. 
See also Holidays; Hours of Work; Sick 
Leave; Vacations with Pay. 

Congress of Industrial Organizations: 

ninth annual convention, 1775. 

tabular report on union membership and 

local unions in Canada classified by 

affiliation, 1201. 
number of union representation votes in 

1946, 635. 
requests for arbitrators during 1946, 638. 
C.I.O. and A. F. of L. discuss labour unity, 

636. 
extracts from address of Frank Bender, 

fraternal delegate to convention of 

C.C. of L., 1578. 

Conroy, Pat, Secretary-Treasurer, Canadian 

Congress of Labour: 
presents legislative program of C.C. of L., 

49$; reply to Rt. Hon. C. D. Howe, 

Minister of Reconstruction and Supply, 

501. 
remarks at meeting of Standing Committee 

on Immigration and Labour, 784. 
submission to House of Commons Industrial 

Relations Committee, 1102. 
extracts from letter assailing dual loyalty 

of Communist unions, 1008. 

Conscription : 

Canada — 

conscription for any extra-territorial war 
opposed by C.C.C.L., 1588, 

Construction : 

See Building and Construction Industry. 

Consumers' Co-operatives : 

See Co-operative Societies. 

Continuation of Transitional Measures Act 
(1947): 

provisions, 1327. 

Contract Labour : 

Canada — 

suspension of order prohibiting entry into 
Canada of contract labour, 628. 

Contributions : 

Canada — 

determination of unemployment insurance 
contributions for five-day or forty-hour 
week, 1757, 1812. 

refund of unemployment insurance contri- 
butions, 1670. 

unemployment insurance contributions and 
benefits for veterans, 1812. 

See also Unemployment Insurance. 



INDEX 



Controls : 

U.S.A.— 

authority to re-impose controls in fight 
against inflation sought by President 
Truman, 1767; enactment of legisla- 
tion providing for new rent controls, 
urged by C.I.O., 1776. 

Co-operation: 

review of treatise on extension courses in 
co-operation at Laval University, pub- 
lished by I.L.O., 622. 

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation: 

resolution of C.C. of L., 1580. 

Co-operative Societies: 

Canada — 

convention of Canadian Co-operative 

Union, 278. 
recommendations of C.C. of L., 1583. 

Alta.: new by-laws governing all associations 
incorporated under Co-operative Asso- 
ciations Act, 197. 

B.C.: amendments in Co-operative Associa- 
tions Act, 1020. 

Man.: re establishment of joint organization 
of labour and farmers, 1412. 

Que.: provisions of Act in respect to Caisses 
Populaires Des jar dins, 1489. 

Sask.: amendments in Credit Union Act, and 
Co-operative Associations Act, 1496. 

United Kingdom: strong financial condition 
of British co-operatives, 1099. 

Germany: removal of co-operative movement, 
11. 

U.S.A.: effect of consumers' co-operatives on 
full production and full employment, 
1099; trade union interest in co-oper- 
ative movement, 1567; developments in 
consumers' co-operative movement in 
1946, 658, 1446; operations of con- 
sumers' co-operatives during 1945, 396. 

Cornell University: 

publication of labour relations journal by 
New York State School of Labour 
Relations, 922. 

Correspondence Courses : 

Canada — 

correspondence courses under C.V.T., 67, 

210, 212, 384, 561, 1031, 1033, 1189, 

1478. 
number of veterans completing training 

under C.V.T., 1756. 
transfer of supervision of schools from 

C.V.T. to D.V.A., 1674. 
correspondence courses for U.I.C. personnel, 

1035. 

Cost of Living: 

report of Committee on Cost of Living 
submitted to International Conference 
of Labour iStatisticians, 1596. 
Canada — 

the cost-of-living index and its meaning, 
952. 

monthly report on cost-of-living index as 
reported by D.B. of S., 103, 260, 461, 
664, 753, 899, 1072, 1229, 1391, 1546, 
1738, 1876. 



Cost of Living — Con. 

publication of average family budget in 
Labour Gazette, requested by C.C.C.L., 
501; requests cost-of-living increase in 
family allowance payments, 502. 
revision of cost-of-living index recom- 
mended by C.C. of L., 500-; resolution 
re compilation of index, 1585. 
more accurate compilation of index 
requested by T. and L.C., 496; resolu- 
tions adopted, 1573, 1575. 

Alta.: recommendation of Federation of 
Labour, 259. 

Ont.: payment of cost-of-living bonus to cer- 
tain o'ld age pensioners provided by 
amended regulations under Old Age 
Pensions Act, 1498. 

United Kingdom: establishment of new cost- 
of-living index, 917. 

Belgium: resolutions taken at National Con- 
ference of Labour, 1605. 

Italy: statement of General Confederation of 
Labour, 1778. 

U.S.A.: increase in price index from 1945 to 
1947, 635-36; "Newburyport Plan" to 
reduce prices, 922; report on collective 
agreements providing adjustments of 
wages to cost of living, 792; trade 
union interest in co-operative move- 
ment, 1667; government action to 
reduce cost of living urged by A.F. of 
L., 1774. 
See also Prices. 

Cotton Industry: 

United Kingdom — 

recommendations of cotton working party, 
156; appointment of Commission of 
Inquiry into wage structure and 
methods of organization of work in 
cotton weaving industry, 8. 

Councils : 

See Development Councils. 

Courts of Referees: 

See Unemployment Insurance. 

Credit Unions: 

Canada — 

annual survey of credit unions (1946) by 

Federal Department of Agriculture. 

1889. 
Man.: amendment in Credit Unions Act, 1022. 
Que.: provisions of Act in respect to Caisses 

Populaires Desjardins, 1489. 
Sask.: amendments in Credit Union Act. and 

Co-operative Associations Act, 1496. 

Criminal Code: 

Canada — 

amendment re strike action and picketing 
requested by C.C. of L., 500. 

Cripps, Sir Stafford, President, Board of 
Trade (United Kingdom): 
statement on establishment of tripartite 
working parties, 155. 

Crown Companies: 

provisions of Government Employees' Com- 
pensation Act, 1326. 



INDEX 



Culture : 

Czechoslovakia — 

proceedings of plenary session of General 
Council of Trade Unions, 1777. 

Currie, Hon. L. D., Minister of Labour 
(Nova Scotia): 

remarks at Industrial Relations Confer- 
ence of Maritime Bureau of Industrial 
Relations, 20. 

extracts from address at Industrial Rela- 
tions Conference, 1778. 

Czechoslovakia : 

proceedings of plenary session of General 
Council of Trade Unions, 1777. 

Dalhousie University : 

eighth annual Industrial Relations Confer- 
ence of the Maritime Bureau of 
Industrial Relations, 20. 

annual conference on Industrial Relations, 
1778. 

Dangerous Trades: 

See Occupational Hazards. 

Decasualization : 

See Dock Workers. 

Decontrol : 

Canada — 

extensive measure of decontrol announced 
by Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent, Act- 
ing Minister of Finance, 1545. 

inquiries into price decontrol, 1408. 

government policy described in annual 
report (1946) of W.P.T.B., 601-2. 

Demobilization : 

Canada — 

discharges from armed forces and rein- 
statements in civil employment 
August 1, 1945-December 31, 1946 (with 
tables and chart), 648, 649, 652. 

Denmark : 

study on collective agreements, 1124. 

Dental Supplies: 

Canada — 

report of investigation under Combines 
Investigation Act into alleged combine 
in manufacture <and sale of dental sup- 
plies, 1264. 

Department Stores : 

U.S.A.— 

trends in department store unionization, 
1127. 

Dependants : 

Canada — 
establishment and functions of inter- 
departmental Advisory Committee on 
veterans' dependants overseas, 559. 

Design in Industry: 

United Kingdom — 

establishment of Council of Industrial 
Design under proposed Industrial 
Organization Bill, 280, 281. 



Detective Agencies: 

Canada — 

legislative recommendation of T. and L C 
497. 

Development Councils: 

United Kingdom — 

establishment provided under proposed 
Industrial Organization Bill, 280. 

Dionne Spinning Mill Company: 

admission of workers from Europe for 
employment at company's mills, 629, 
1412. 

Disabled Persons: 

See Handicapped Workers. 

Discrimination : 

Canada — 

policy of C.C. of L., on racial and 
religious intolerance, outlined at con- 
vention, 1583. 
report of Committee on racial discrim- 
ination presented at convention of 
T. and L.C., 1572. 

Man.: non-adoption of Bill to prohibit dis- 
crimination, 1024. 

N.S.: provision of new Trade Union Act, 
1329; provisions of Fishermen's 
Federation Act, 1330. 

Sask.: provisions of Bill of Rights, 1495. 

U.S.A.: admission policies of labour unions, 
1267; strike to enforce violation of 
Act ruled illegal by N.L.R.B., 284. 

Diseases, Industrial: 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Committee on 
Coal Mining, 1119. 

Canada — 

provisions of Government Employees' 
Compensation Act, 1326. 

Man.: new regulations under Factories Act 
governing lead, benzol and dangerous 
processes, 551. 

N.B.: amended provisions of Factories Act 
(1946), 1893. 

Que.: report of Division of Industrial 
Hygiene (1941-43), 1664; amendment 
in Workmen's Compensation Act urged 
in legislative resolution, 1490. 

Australia: recommendations of Conference 
of Commonwealth and state labour 
ministers, 1822. 

United Kingdom: appointment of Committee 
on Compensation for Industrial 
Diseases, 776; incidence of neurosis 
among factory workers, 1600; damages 
for breach of Factories Act in dusty 
trade, 850; draft health and welfare 
regulations for the pottery industry 
issued under authority of Factories 
Act, 1752; annual report of Inspector 
of Factories (1945), 153. 

U.S.A.: research on miners' diseases 
(silicosis, etc.), planned by U.M.W., 
921. 

Dismissal Pay: 

Canada — 

provided under recent collective agree- 
ments in manufacturing industry, 
1756. 



INDEX 



Displaced Persons: 

Canada — 

immigration of workers from displaced 

persons' camps, 1245, 1407, 1562. 
arrival and placement of domestic 
workers from displaced persons' camps, 
1562. 
admission of Polish girls from Europe for 
employment in mills of Dionne 
Spinning Mill Company, 629, 1412. 

United Kingdom: Britain and France con- 
clude agreement for recruitment of 
displaced persons, 1249. 

France: Britain and France conclude agree- 
ment on recruitment of displaced 
persons, 1249. 

U.S.A.: admission of European displaced 
persons approved by A.F. of L., 1774. 

Dock Workers: 

United Kingdom — 

decasualization of dock labour — proposals 
for establishing permanent policy, 317. 

Doctors: 

See Medical Services. 

Domestic Workers: 

Canada — 

employment of domestics from displaced 
persons' camps, 1245, 1407, 1562. 

United Kingdom: functions of National 
Institute of Houseworkers, 776. 

U.S.A.: inclusion under Workmen's Com- 
pensation law in New York state, 285. 

Dominion Coal Board: 

proposed establishment, 1093. 
provisions of Act and functions of Board, 
1325. 

Dominion-Provincial Farm Labour Confer- 
ence: 

proceedings of fourth annual conference, 5. 

Dominion-Provincial Old Age Pensions 
Agreements : 

amendments to Old Age Pensions Act, 
1408. 

Dominion Stores, Limited: 

retirement pension plan, 570. 

Dominion Sugar Company: 

employment on sugar farms, of workers 
admitted from Europe, 629. 

Dukeston, Lord, British Trades Union Con- 
gress : 
extracts from address at convention of 
T. and L.C., 1570. 

Dust: 

United Kingdom — 

damages for breach of Factories Act in 
dusty trade, 850. 

U.S.A.: Clean Air (Removal of Dusts) — 
summary of pamphlet issued by 
Department of Labour, 835. 

Dyeing and Finishing Industry: 

United Kingdom — 
review of report on Accident Prevention 
in the Dyeing and Finishing Indus- 
try, 7. 



Earnings: 

Canada — 

report (with charts and tables) on post- 
war trend of real and money earnings 
in manufacturing, 949-53. 

man-hours and hourly earnings as reported 
to D.B. of S., 85, 722, 871, 1523, 1713, 
1845. 

annual earnings of mine workers described 
in report of Royal Commission on 
Coal, 306. 

U.S.A.: high level of wages and salaries, 921. 

Economic and Employment Commission of 
the United Nations: 

first meeting, 312. 

second meeting, 1123. 

functions of subcommissions on employ- 
ment policy and economic stability, and 
economic development, 312, 1123. 

Economic Development: 

See Economic Policy. 

Economic Policy: 

functions of subcommissions on employ- 
ment policy and economic stability, 
and economic development (Economic 
and Employment Commission of United 
Nations), 312, 1123. 
Canada — 

report on "Forecast of 1947 Investment by 

Canadian Business", 504. 
extracts from address on economic recovery 
program, given at Industrial Relations 
Conference, 1779. 

N.S.: extracts from address on economic 
recovery program, given at Industrial 
Relations Conference, 1779; suggested 
solutions for economic problems dis- 
cussed at Industrial Relations Confer- 
ence of the Maritime Bureau of 
Industrial Relations, 20. 

United Kingdom: summary of White Paper 
entitled. Economic Survey for 19^7, 
506. 

Czechoslovakia: proceedings of plenary 
session of General Council of Trade 
Unions, 1777. 

Germany: current economic conditions out- 
lined in draft statement of Inter-zonal 
Conference of Trade Unions, 1777. 

U.S.A.: first economic report presented to 
Congress, 511. 

Economic Research: 

See Research. 

Economic Stability: 

See Economic Policy. 

Economics : 

United Kingdom — 

report of Clapham Committee on economic 
and social research, 16. 

Edible Plant Products: 

Canada — 

wage rates, hours and working conditions 
in edible plant products industries 
(flour milling, bread and cake, biscuit 
and confectionery manufacturing), 
1850. 



INDEX 



Education: 

Canada — 

university training under Federal reha- 
bilitation plan, 213, 559. 
report (with table) on number of veterans 
receiving university education under 
Post-Discharge Re-establishment Order 
during period October, 1945 to 
October, 1946, 63, 64. 
tabular report on number of university 
student veterans receiving D.V.A. 
allowances, 65. 
booklet on Vocational and Pre-Matricula- 
tion Training of Canada's Veterans, 
issued by Department of Labour, 914. 
functions and purposes of Industrial Rela- 
tions Section, Montreal University, 
686. 
recommendations of C.C. of L., 500, 1585; 
report of convention committee on 
Education and Publicity, 1585. 
resolution adopted at convention of T. 
and L.C., 1575. 

B.C.: amendments in Public Schools Act, 
1019. 

Man.: report of Royal Commission on Adult 
Education, 1089; amendment in Public 
Schools Act, 1022. 

Ont.: regulations under School Attendance 
Act, 1025; under Adolescent School 
Attendance Act, 1024; review of activi- 
ties of Provincial Institute of Textiles, 
1189. 

Que.: amendments in Specialized Schools 
Act re technical education, 1489. 

Sask.: amendment in Vocational Education 
Act, 1493; in School Grants Act, 1493. 

United Kingdom: school-leaving age raised 
under Education Act (1944), 634. 

U.S.A.: establishment of Institute of Indus- 
trial and Social Medicine as indus- 
trial health unit, 922; development in 
co-operative movement in 1946, 1447; 
federal aid for education favoured bv 
A.F. of L. 1774; establishment of Edu- 
cational and Political League by A.F. 
of L., 1774. 
See also Vocational Education. 

Efficiency: 

See Industrial Efficiency. 
Elections : 

Canada — 

compulsory voting recommended by C.C.C.L.. 

502. 

recommendations of C.C. of L., 500, 1585. 

extension of franchise, and granting of 

voting rights to Indians, urged bv 

T. and L.C., 1575. 

Alta.: provision of Act re public holiday, 

839. 
U.S.A.: holiday on all state, national primary 
and general election days favoured by 
A. F. of L., 1774; provisions of Labour- 
Management Relations Act in respect 
to union elections, 947-48. 

Electrical Products Industry : 

Canada — 

wage rates, hours and working conditions 
in electrical machinery and apparatus, 
and radio sets and parts industry, 
1722. 



Electricity : 

Que. — 

new licensing and apprenticeship regulations 
under Electricians and Electrical 
Installations Act, 1817. 

Sask.: new provisions of Electrical Inspec- 
tion and Licensing Act, 1493; amended 
regulations, 201. 

United Kingdom: provisions of Factories 
(Hours of Employment in Factories 
Using Electricity) Order, (1947), 1413. 

Elevator Operators : 

Canada — 

bilingual training school for janitors and 
elevator operators in Montreal, 917. 

Emergency Powers : 

provisions of Continuation of Transitional 
Measures Act (1947), 1327. 

Emigration : 

Canada — 

N.E.S. encourages Canadian employees to 
remain in Canada — statement of Min- 
ister of Labour, 771. 

Employer-Employee Relations: 

See Labour-Management Co-operation. 

Employers' Organizations : 

Turkey- 
legal status of unions and employers' 
groups, 1417. 

Employment: 

first meeting of the Economic and Employ- 
ment Commission (U.N.O.), 312. 

production and employment in iron and 
steel industry — report of International 
Labour Office presented at second 
session of I.L.O. Industrial Committee, 
1767. 

production and employment in metal trades 
— report of International Labour 
Office presented at second session of 
I.L.O. Industrial Committee, 1770. 

report of Committee on Employment, 
Unemployment and the Labour Force 
submitted to International Conference 
of Labour Statisticians, 1596. 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Inland Transport, 1121. 

resolution on full employment adopted by 
Textiles Committee of I.L.O. at meet- 
ing held in Brussels, 140. 
Canada — 

high level of employment — statement of 
Minister of Labour, 911. 

review of man-power situation in 1946 
_ (with chart and tables) , 648-56. 

national reserve of public projects as 
factor in stabilizing employment — text 
of paper on Timing of Public Invest- 
ment in Construction, 128. 

obligation of veteran students in United 
States to return to Canada on gradua- 
tion, for employment, 771-72. 

N.E.S. encourages Canadian employees to 
remain in Canada — statement of Min- 
ister of Labour, 771. 

activities of Canadian Mission appointed 
to select Polish Veterans, 1750. 

immigration of workers from displaced 
persons' camps, 1245, 1407. 

arrival and placement of domestic workers 
from displaced persons' camps, 1562. 



INDEX 



Employment — Con . 

admission of workers from Europe for 
employment in textile (Dionne Spinning 
Mill Company) and sugar beet indus- 
tries, 629, 1412. 

new regulations under Unemployment 
Insurance Act require employers to 
report job vacancies, 483; text of 
regulations, 569. 

employment trends in the professions — 
report (with charts) of Bureau of 
Technical Personnel, 1419. 

survey of professional openings — future 
employment opportunities for 
university-trained personnel, 1093. 

geographical distribution of professional 
openings in Canada, 1564. 

the problem of the older worker, 1251-58; 
jobs specially suitable for older 
workers, 1257. 

Canadian Corps of Commissionaires assists 
in rehabilitation of older veterans, 
630. 

employment of older workers discussed by 
Deputy Minister of Labour, 4. 

job orientation training — induction pro- 
gram for government employees 
directed by C.V.T., 489. 

assistance of Citizens' Committees in 
obtaining employment for veterans, 
386. 

results of New Brunswick survey on 
veterans' training plan for employ- 
ment, 65. 

study (with charts and tables) on seasonal 
variations of employment in the 
automobile and parts industry, 287-92. 

notice of termination of employment clause 
in collective agreements in fishing 
industry, 1439. 

annual review of employment and payrolls 
(1946), 1529. 

seasonal variation in employment of coal 
miners outlined in report of Royal 
Commission on Coal, 305; regularity 
of employment, 306. 

D.B. of S. surveys on civilian labour force, 
226, 727, 1350. 

monthly summary of employment and 
unemployment, 75, 224, 398, 572, 714, 
863, 1044, 1196, 1348, 1502, 1690, 1823. 

man-hours and hourly earnings as reported 
to D.B. of S., 85, 722, 871, 1523, 1713, 
1845. 

employment and payrolls as reported to 
D.B. of S. by employers (with chart 
and tables), 78. 230, 400, 574, 716, 
866, 1047, 1198, 1352, 1504, 1693, 1826. 

monthly report on employment conditions 
by industry and by region (N.E.S.), 
89, 236, 406, 580. 730, 875, 1050, 1203, 
1357, 1510, 1698, 1831. 

monthly report (with charts and tables) 
on operations of N.E.S.. 89, 236, 406, 
580, 730, 875, 1050, 1203, 1357, 1510, 
1698, 1831. 

quarterly report of employment service 
offices for periods September 27, 1946 
to Januarv 2, 1947, 250; January 3, 
1947 to April 3. 1947, 742; April 4, 
1947 to Julv 3. 1947. 1218; Julv 4, 
1947 to October 2. 1947, 1711. 



Employment — Con. 

report of employment service offices for 

period December 28, 1945 to Jauary 2, 

1947, 416. 
sex distribution of persons in recorded 

employment, 82, 84, 235, 404, 576, 721, 

869, 1050, 1203, 1357, 1509, 1697, 1829. 

Employment and Industrial Statistics: 

Canada — 
monthly summary (with table) reflecting 
industrial conditions, 3, 120, 278, 484, 
626, 772, 912, 1096, 1244, 1410, 1562, 
1755. 

Employment Policy: 

legislative recommendation of C.C.C.L. re 

full employment, 502. 
establishment of public works program to 
maintain full employment urged by 
C.C. of L., 1583. 

Man.: legislative resolution re seven days' 
notice, 1023. 

N.S.: provisions of Nova Scotia Labour Act 
re preference to residents, 1332; 
employment conditions in Maritimes 
described at Industrial Relations Con- 
ference of the Maritime Bureau of 
Industrial Relations, 20; annual report 
of Department of Labour (1946), 
1090. 

Australia: high level of employment indi- 
cated in report, 919. 

United Kingdom: report (with table) on 
distribution of total man-power, 507-8; 
situation in 1947, 510; appeal for 
women workers to reduce labour 
shortages, 918: Committee appointed 
to study two-shift system, recommends 
amendments in Employment of Women 
and Young Persons Act (1936), 1268; 
establishment of Remploy Factories 
for employment of disabled persons, 
7; peacetime system of continuous 
employment of merchant seamen pro- 
vided in agreements negotiated by 
National Maritime Board, 633; decas- 
ualization of dock labour — proposals 
for establishing permanent policy, 317; 
regulations under Factories Act (1937) 
governing fees for medical examina- 
tions for employment, 1417. 

U.S.A.: employment trends in 1947 outlined in 
economic report delivered by President 
Truman to Congress, 511-12; high 
level of employment and earnings, 921; 
employment statistics (1945-46), 126; 
guaranteed employment plan of rail- 
way company, 1418; effect of con- 
sumers' co-operatives on full employ- 
ment. 1099; number of workers in 
central co-operatives, 397; enactment 
of full employment legislation sought 
by C.I.O., 1776, and urges full protec- 
tion for job rights of veterans. 1776; 
organization of civilian and veteran 
amputees for "self-help"' in obtaining 
employment, 623; minimum age for 
employment in specified hazardous 
occupations in state of Maine, 1737; 
regulations governing migratory labour 
in New York state, 62. 
Sec also Youth Employment and Training. 



INDEX 



Employment Committees : 

report of Employment Committee of Gov- 
erning Body of I.L.O., 787. 
Canada — 

appointment of Judge W. J. Lindal, as 
chairman of National Employment 
Committee, 916. 

placement of older workers studied by 
National Employment Committee, 1484. 

Employment Conditions : 

See Conditions of Employment. 

Employment Service : 

Employment Service Organization — report 
issued by International Labour Office. 
316. 

first discussion of Employment Service 
Organization at thirtieth session of 
I.L.O., 1594. 
Canada — 

Canadian employees encouraged to remain 
in Canada — statement of Minister of 
Labour, 771. 

obligation of veteran students in United 
States to return to Canada on grad- 
uation, for employment, 771-72. 

meeting of National Employment Com- 
mittee with Maritime Committee, 708. 

new regulations under Unemployment 
Insurance Act require employers to 
report job vacancies, 483; text of reg- 
ulations, 569. 

functions of Community Youth Placement 
Centres, 642. 

transfer of unemployed persons from Nova 
Scotia, 625. 

registration of veterans, 63. 

analysis of rehabilitation aids, 213-14. 

functions described at Industrial Relations 
Conference of Maritime Bureau of 
Industrial Relations, 20. 

training-on^the-job opportunities for veter- 
ans allocated by C.V.T., 120. 

correspondence courses for N.E.S. personnel, 
1035. 

monthly report (with chart and tables) on 
operations of N.E.S., 89, 236, 406, 580, 
730, 875, 1050, 1203, 1357, 1510, 1698, 
1831. 

quarterly report of employment offices for 
periods September 27, 1946, to Jan- 
uary 2, 1947, 250: January 3, 1947 
to April 3, 1947, 742; April 4, 1947 
to July 3, 1947, 1218; July 4, 1947 to 
October 2, 1947, 1711. 

report of employment offices for period 
December 28, 1945 to January 2>, 1947, 
416. 
N.B.: "plant visit program" to improve 

service in employment office, 1098. 
N.S.: provision of Employment Agencies Act, 

697. 
Que.: annual report (1945), 117; activities 
during 1945-46, 1688, 



Engineering: 

first meeting of building, civil engineering 
and public works committee of I.L.O., 
in Brussels, 142. 

Canada — 

Timing of Public Investment in Construc- 
tion — text of paper presented to Peter- 
boro branch of the Engineering Insti- 
tute of Canada, 128, 
scientific and professional employment dur- 
ing 1946-47 (report of Bureau of 
Technical Personnel), 710. 
employment trends in the professions — 
report (with chants) of Bureau of 
Technical Personnel, 1419. 

N.S.: provisions of Engine Operators' Act 
(1945), 1332. 

United Kingdom: statistics re distribution 
of man-power, 508; agreement for pub- 
lic holidays with pay in building and 
civil engineering contracting industries, 
1414. 

U.S.A.: unionization of professional engineers 
>and chemists, 10. 

Equal Pay: 

resolution adopted by Textiles Committee 
of I.L.O., at meeting held in Brussels, 
140. 

United Kingdom: recommendation of T.U.C., 
1589. 

U.S.A.: extension of principle urged at 
National Conference on Labour Legis- 
lation, 206-7. 

Equal Rights: 

U.S.A.— 
resolution of C.I.O., 1776. 

"Escape" Clause : 

See Industrial Disputes. 

Espionage : 

Canada — 

legislative resolution of C.C. of L., 499. 

Evaluation : 

See Job Evaluation. 

Evictions : 

Canada — 

rent and eviction controls unaffected by 

decontrol measures, 1545. 
remarks of Hon. D. C. Abbott, Minister of 

Finance, on continuance of rental and 

eviction controls, 486. 
resolution adopted' by C.C. of L., 1581. 

Ex-Service Women: 

See Veterans. 

Excessive Profits Tax : 

Canada — 

resolution adopted by C.C. of L., 1581. 
reinstitution urged by T. and L.C., 1575. 

Expenditure : 

Canada — 

report on Research and Scientific Expendi- 
ture of Dominion Government (1938- 
1946), tabled in House of Commons, 
503. 

report on national income and expenditure 
issued by D.B. of S., 1866. 

gross national expenditure at market prices 
(1938-1946) given in D.B. of S. report 
on national income, 311. 



XXIV 



INDEX 



Explosives : 

Canada — 

new regulations under Explosives Act, 196. 

Exports : 

Canada — 

comparative figures (1946-1947), 911. 
, chart showing seasonal trends in automobile 
and parts industry, 289. 

Eyestrain : 

New Zealand — 

results of study on eyestrain in industry, 
127. 

Factories : 

Governing Body of I.L.O. authorizes 
factory safety conference to draft 
Model Code of Safety Provisions for 
Factories, 786. 

Canada — 
new regulations under Explosives Act, 196. 
use of colour to promote safety, 789. 
summary of booklet on Noise and Vibra- 
tion Control, 789. 
recommendation of T. and L.C. re employ- 
ment of children, 1575. 

B.C.: regulations under Act, 197; amend- 
ments, 1018. 

Man.: new regulations under Factories Act 
governing lead, benzol and dangerous 
processes, 551, governing petroleum 
products, 200; administration of Act 
during 1946 reviewed in annual report 
of Department of Labour, 620; in- 
spections in 1946, 620-21. 

N.B.: provisions of Act (1946), 1893; in- 
spections during 1946, 1893. 

N.S.: revised regulations under Act, 1330. 

Que.: inspections during 1941-1943 — annual 
report of Division of Industrial 
Hygiene, 1664. 

Sask.: regulations under Factories Act 
governing safety in motor vehicle 
repair shops, 1499; amendment in 
Workmen's Wage Act, 1493. 

Australia: resolutions adopted by Confer- 
ence of Commonwealth and state 
labour ministers, 1822. 

New Zealand: results of study on eyestrain 
in industry, 127. 

United Kingdom: summary of report on 
human motivation in industry, 14; 
establishment of Remploy Factories 
for employment of disabled persons. 
7; annual report of Inspector of 
Factories (1945) — hours of work, 149; 
personnel management, 150; accidents, 
151; industrial health, 153; enforce- 
ment of regulations, 154; regulations 
under Factories Act (1937) governing 
fees for medical examinations for 
employment, 1417; provisions of 
Factories (Hours of Employment in 
Factories Using Electricity) Order 
(1947), 1413; damages for breach of 
Factories Act in dusty trade, 850; 
incidence of neurosis among factory 
workers, 1600; meals for workers in 
British factories, 918; recommenda- 
tions of Committee appointed to study 
economic need and social consequences 
of double-day shifts, 1268; draft 
health and welfare regulations for the 
pottery industry issued under authority 
of Factories Act, 1752; measures to 



Factories — Con. 

improve working conditions in iron 
foundries recommended in report of 
Joint Advisory Committee, 1780; 
recommendations of T.U.C., 1589. 

India: historical summary of Factories Acts, 
1730. 

Italy: mediation machinery established in 
all plants — compulsory creation of 
factory commissions, 1250. 

U.S.A.: legislation governing women work- 
ing on shifts in factories in New York 
state, 285. 

Fahey, R. J., Newfoundland Federation of 
Labour: 
extracts from address at convention of 
T. and L.C, 1571. 
Fair Labour Practices: 
Canada — 

provisions of collective agreements in 
fishing industry, 1435, 1443. 
U.S.A.: enactment of legislation urged by 
C.I.O., 1776. 
Fair Labour Standards Act (U.S.A.): 

decision of Supreme Court re portal-to- 
portal pay, 8. 
time spent in preparing for work too 
trifling to warrant damages under 
Act, 556. 
Supreme Court removes trainees from 

minimum wage regulations, 284. 
enforcement of wage and hour and child 

labour laws in 1946, 778. 
resolution adopted by C.I.O., 1776. 
extension of child labour provisions to 
cover all employment in interstate 
commerce, sought by National Com- 
mission on Children and- Youth, 283. 
minimum age for employment in specified 
hazardous occupations in State of 
Maine, 1737. 
Fair Wages : 

resolution adopted by Textile Committee 
of I.L.O. at meeting held in Brussels, 
140. 
Canada — 

fair wages conditions in Dominion gov- 
ernment contracts, 52, 190, 372, 547, 
691, 828, 1004, 1177, 1310, 1665, 1805. 
Que.: annual report of Department of 
Labour, 1687. 
See also Minimum Wages; Wages. 

Fairweather, S. W., Vice-President, Research 
and Development, C.N.R.: 
summary of evidence before Senate Stand- 
ing Committee on Immigration and 
Labour, 1108. 

Family Allowances: 

Canada — 

increase in payments during January, 1947, 
280. 

payments during December, 1946, 125. 

administration during 1945-47, 1424. 

recommendations of C.C.C.L., 502, 1587. 
N.S.: value of Act stressed by Chief Admin- 
istrative Officer, at Industrial Rela- 
tions Conference of the Maritime 
Bureau of Industrial Relations, 20. 

See also Mothers' Allowances. 

Family Security: 

U.S.A.— 

National Conference on Familv Life to be 
held in 1948, 1415. 



INDEX 



Farm Income : 

See Income. 

Farm Labour: 

exchange of harvesting units between 
Canada and United States, 775. 
Canada — 

increase in farm wage rates, 912. 

immigration of Polish veterans to work on 
farms, 628. 

activities of Canadian Mission appointed 
to select Polish veterans, 1750. 

immigration of workers from displaced 
persons' camps, 1407. 

admission of workers from Europe for 
employment in sugar beet industry, 
629. 

continuation of farm labour program, 487. 

proceedings of fourth annual Dominion- 
Provincial Farm Labour Conference, 
5. 
U.S.A.: regulations governing migratory 
labour in New York state, 62. 

Farm Wages: 

See Farm Labour; Wages. 

Farmer-Labour Co-operation : 

Man. — 

re establishment of joint organization of 
labour and farmers, 1412. 

Farming Industry: 

farm accidents in Canada and the United 

States, 1888. 
Canada — 

farm income during 1946, 487. 

Polish veterans permitted to purchase or 

rent own farms, 1757. 
non-fatal accidents and fires — D.B. of S. 

survey on farm accidents, 1887. 
recommendation of C.C. of L., 1585. 
United Kingdom: increase in minimum wage 

rates, overtime rates, public holidays 

with pay, and reduction in work-week. 

for farm workers in England and 

Wales, 1892. 
U.S.A.: survey of farm accidents, 1888; 

support of adequate minimum wage 

and old age security for farm workers 

pledged by A.F. of L., 1774. 

Federation of Labour: 

See Alberta Federation of Labour; Cana- 
dian Federation of Labour; New- 
foundland Federation of Labour. 

Films: 

See National Film Board. 

Finance : 

1948 budget for work of I.L.O. approved 
at 101st session of Governing Body, 
786; at thirtieth session of Confer- 
ence, 1594. 

Fire Departments: 

Sask.— 

enactment of Fire-Departments Platoon 
Act, 1495. 

Fire Prevention : 

Man. — 

regulations under Fire Prevention Act 
governing petroleum products, 200. 



Firemen : 

Ont.— 

provisions of Fire Departments Act 
governing collective bargaining and 
compulsory arbitration, 841, 842. 

Fishing Industry : 

Canada — 

collective agreements in the fishing indus- 
try (1947), 1426-44. 
resolutions adopted at convention of 
T. and L.C., 1575. 
N.S.: provisions of Fishermen's Federation 

Act, 1330. 
United Kingdom: statistics re distribution 
of Man-power in fishing industry, 508. 
See also Legal Decisions. 

Food: 

co-operation between Canada and United 
States in harvesting of crops, 1760. 
Canada — 

extensive measure of decontrol announced 
by Rt. Hon. L. S. St. Laurent, Acting 
Minister of Finance, 1545. 

annual report (1946) of W.P.T.B., 602. 

provision of postal-free delivery of regula- 
tion food parcels to United Kingdom 
during emergency requested by C.C. 
of L., 1585. 
United Kingdom: statistics re distribution 
of man-power in food industry, 508. 

See also Canteens. 

Ford Motor Company: 

U.S.A.— 
pension plan established and wage increases 

granted, 920. 
pension plan rejected by workers, 1758. 
institutes administrative training course 
for supervisory employees, 1415. 

Foreign Affairs: 

Canada — 

resolution of C.C. of L., 1578-79. 
resolutions adopted at convention of 
T. and L.C., 1575. 
United Kingdom: resolution adopted at con- 
vention of T.U.C., 1589. 
U.S.A.: resolutions adopted by A.F. of L., 
1774. 

Foremen : 

Canada — 

training for industrial supervisors and 

foremen under C.V.T., 66, 67, 713. 
recommendation of C.M.A., 1114. 

Ont.: Labour Relations Board certifies fore- 
men's union at Spruce Falls Power 
and Paper Company, Limited, 
Kapuskasing, 277. 

Sask.: Court holds foreman not employer as 
defined by Minimum Wage Act, 555. 

U.S.A.: foremen's strike at Ford Motor 
Company, Detroit, terminated, 1100; 
bargaining rights of foremen upheld 
by Supreme Court, 492; Supreme 
Court holds that employers must 
bargain with foremen's unions, 556; 
exemption of foremen from collective 
bargaining sought by National Asso- 
ciation of Manufacturers, 10. 

Forestry : 

Canada — 

Dominion-provincial plan of reforestation 
urged by C.C. of L., 1583. 



INDEX 



Forsey, Dr. E. A., Director of Research. 
Canadian Congress of Labour: 
presents brief at meeting of Standing 
Committee on Immigration and Labour 
782. 

France: 

study on collective agreements, 1124. 
Britain and France conclude agreement on 

recruitment of displaced persons, 1249. 
regulations to ensure safe working near 

dangerous machinery, 1417. 

Franchise : 

Canada — 

recommendations of C.C. of L., 1585. 
extension of franchise and granting of 

voting rights to Indians, urged by 

T. and L.C., 1575. 

Freedom of Association: 

report of Committee of the Conference 

submitted at thirtieth session of 

I.L.O., 1592-93. 
United Nations approves I.L.O. resolution, 

1764. 
report of International Labour Office to 

Industrial Committee on Iron and 

Steel, 1769. 
resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 

Committee on Inland Transport, 1121 
resolution of sub-committee adopted at 

meeting of I.L.O. Committee o*" 

Petroleum, 315. 
Canada — 

resolution of C.C. of L., 1579. 
B.C.: provisions of Industrial Conciliatior 

and Arbitration Act (1947), 1014. 
U.S.A.: admission policies of labour unions 

1267. 

Freight: 

Canada — 

resolutions adopted at convention of 
T. and L.C., 1575. 

Fruit Picking: 

movement of Indians from Canada to 
assist in fruit picking in United States, 
1763. 

Fuel Oil: 

See Petroleum Products. 

Full Employment : 

See Employment. 

Furniture Industry: 

United Kingdom — 

recommendations of Furniture Working 
Party, 158. 

Garment Manufacturing Industry: 

Canada — 

union discipline and holiday and sick bene- 
fits established under recent collective 
agreements, 1411. 
immigration of workers from displaced 
persons' camps, 1407. 
Man.: provisions of Garment Manufacturers' 
and Employees' Fund Act, 1023. 

Garment Workers : 

See Clothing Workers. 

George, Leo, American Federation of Labour: 
extracts from address at convention of 
T. and L.C., 1570. 



Germany : 

resolution of Textiles Committee of I.L.O., 
re development of textiles industry in 
Germany, 141. 

fifth Inter-zonal Conference of German 
Trade Unions, 1777. 

revival of co-operative societies, 11. 

Gibson, Hon. Colin, Secretary of State: 

extracts from radio address on price and 
related controls, 1546. 

Glen, Hon. James, Minister of Mines and 
Resources: 

announces amendment in immigration reg- 
ulations to include four new admissible 
classes, 122. 

on further immigration of Polish veterans 
to work on farms, 628. 

Gordon, Donald, Chairman, Wartime Prices 
and Trade Board: 
resignation, 487. 

Government Employees' Compensation Act: 

provisions, 1326. 

Grain: 

exchange of grain harvesting units between 
Canada and United States, 1762. 

Grants: 

See Veterans. 

Great Britain: 

See various subject headings. 

Green, William, President, American Federa- 
tion of Labour: 
address at annual convention of A.F. of L., 
1773. 

Grievance Procedure : 

Canada — 

provisions of collective agreements in fishing 

industry, 1431, 1443. 
grievance procedure provided under agree- 
ment making employees of lumber firm 
liable for illegal strikes, 911. 

Australia: policy of Joint Coal Board estab- 
lished to administer measures to 
remedy conditions in coal industry in 
New South Wales, 1416. 

United Kingdom: conciliation machinery in 
building industry, 791, 792; in coal 
mining industry, 513. 

U.S.A.: provisions of Labour-Management 
Relations Act, 947-48; enactment of 
legislation to curb jurisdictional dis- 
putes, 1414; increase of voluntary 
arbitration during 1946, 638; arbitra- 
tion procedure established in building 
trades, 282. 

Group Insurance : 

U.S.A.— 

number of workers covered by group insur- 
ance and annuity policies, 1099. 

Guaranteed Employment: 

See Employment. 



INDEX 



Guaranteed Wage: 

guaranteed wage plans in iron and steel 
industry — report of International 
Labour Office presented at second ses- 
sion of I.L.O. Industrial Committee, 
1768. 
guaranteed wage plan in metal trades — 
report of .International Labour Office 
presented at second session of I.L.O. 
Industrial Committee, 1771. 
resolution adopted by Building, Civil 
Engineering and Public Works Com- 
mittee of I.L.O., at meeting in 
Brussels, 144. 

Canada — 
resolution adopted by C.C. of L., 1581. 

United 'Kingdom: guaranteed work week in 
iron and steel industry, 7; recom- 
mendations contained in Report on 
Inquiry into decasualization of dock 
labour under Dock Workers (Regula- 
tion of Employment) Act, 317. 

U.S.A.: preliminary report on guaranteed 
annual wage in industry, 13; final 
report on annual wage plans, 2'81; 
development of guaranteed wage plans 
under collective agreements, 319, 320; 
first guaranteed annual wage plan in 
automobile industry secured by U.A.W., 
777; garment company establishes 
annual wage plan limiting liability to 
employer, 637; guaranteed annual 
wage plan established in meat packing 
company, 1 2i5' ; guaranteed wage studies 
favoured by Harry S. Truman. Presi- 
dent of the United States, 491. 

Handicapped Workers : 

Canada — 

results of survey of handicapped workers, 

123. 
functions of Citizens' Committees in place- 
ment of veterans, 386. 
placement of handicapped ex-service women 
in western provinces, 385. 

United Kingdom: establishment of Remploy 
Factories for employment of disabled 
persons, 7. 

U.S.A.: civilian and veteran amputees 
organize for "self-help", 623; compara- 
tive survey of job performance by 
physically impaired and able-bodied 
workers, 126. 

Harvesting : 

exchange of harvesting units between 
Canada and United States, 775. 

co-operation between Canada and United 
States in harvesting of crops, 1760. 

Hazardous Occupations : 

See Occupational Hazards. 

Health: 

•application in Canada of conventions and 
recommendations (re young workers) 
adopted at 29th session of International 
Labour Conference, 316. 

recommendations of Building, Civil Engin- 
eering and Public Works Committee of 
I.L.O., at meeting in Brussels, 143. 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committees on Coal Mining, 1119; Iron 
and Steel, 1769. 



Health— Con. 

recommendations of Textile Committee of 

I.L.O., 141. 
international co-operation towards better 

standards of living — text of article 

reprinted from United Nations Weekly 

Bulletin, 145-48. 

Canada — 

increase in health programs in industry, 
1756. 

provisions of collective agreements in the 
fishing industry, 1430. 

health and working conditions of Federal 
government employees investigated by 
Civil Service Health Division, Depart- 
ment of National Health and Welfare, 
489. 

health program for employees of Bell Tele- 
phone Company of Canada, 1815. 

activities of Industrial Health Division, 
described in annual report of Depart- 
ment of National Health and Welfare, 
488>. 

Unemployment Insurance and Health — text 
of article prepared by Mr. Eric Stang- 
room, Department of Labour, 388. 

summary of booklet on Noise and Vibration 
Control, 789. 

National Health Week sponsored by Health 
League of Canada, 125. 

establishment of "health and decency" bud- 
get urged by C.C. of L., 500; other 
recommendations, 499, 1585. 

recommendations of T. and L.C., 1575. 
B.C.: new regulations under Act governing 
eating and drinking places, and work 
camps, 197. 
N S.: revised regulations under Factories Act, 
1331; provisions of Company Doctors 
Act, 1331. 
Que.: provisions of Act to encourage estab- 
lishment of physicians in country dis- 
tricts, 1489; amended regulations under 
Industrial and Commercial Establish- 
ments Act re workers in compressed 
air, 1683; report of Division of Indus- 
trial Hygiene (1941-43), 1664. 
S;isk.: provisions of Hospitalization Services 
Plan, 280; amendments to Health Ser- 
vices Act, 1495, 1684; regulations under 
Hospitalization Act, 201; amended 
regulations under Public Health Act, 
1336. 
Australia: policy of Joint Coal Board estab- 
lished to administer measures to remedy 
conditions in coal industry in New 
South Wales, 1416. 
New Zealand: results of study on eyestrain 

in industry, 127. 
United Kingdom: incidence of neurosis among 
factory workers, 1600; regulations un- 
der factories Act (1937) governing fees 
for medical examinations for employ- 
ment, 1417; industrial health measures 
reviewed in annual report of Inspector 
of Factories (1945), 153 ; measures to 
improve working conditions in iron 
foundries recommended in report of 
Joint Advisory Committee, 1780; draft 
health and welfare regulations for pot- 
tery industry issued under authority of 
Factories Act, 1752. 



INDEX 



Health— Con. 

U.S.A.: provision of health and welfare plans 
in collective agreements, 319; collective 
•bargaining developments in union 
health and welfare plans, 1126; health 
and welfare provisions of new agree- 
ments in coal mines, 1099-1100; pro- 
gress of health co-operatives in 1946, 
1447; establishment of Institute o<f 
Industrial and Social Medicine as 
industrial health unit, 922; research 
on miners' diseases (silicosis, etc.), 
planned by U.M.W., 921; recommenda- 
tions of National Conference on Labour 
Legislation, 206. 
See also Medical Services; iSick Leave. 

Health Insurance : 

Canada — 

establishment of Inter-departmental Com- 
mittee to study health insurance for 
Federal government employees, 489. 

enactment of national plan advocated by 
C.C. of L., 1582; legislative recom- 
mendations, 499. 

enactment of national scheme urged by T. 
and L.C., 495-96, 1575. 
U.S.A.: government program provides against 
loss of wages due to temporary sick- 
ness or injury of railroad workers, 638; 
development of health cooperatives, 
659; insurance against cost of medical 
care for workers and dependents recom- 
mended by Social Security Board in 
annual report, 283. 

Health League of Canada: 

issues report on use of colour to promote 
safety in factories, 789. 

sponsors National Health Week, 125. 

health program for employees of Bell Tele- 
phone Company of Canada outlined at 
annual meeting, 1815. 

Hemming, A. E., Associate Secretary-Trea- 
surer, T. and L. C: 
appointment, 490. 

High Employment: 

See Employment. 

Highways : 

Man. — 

amendments in Highway Traffic Act re 
minimum age of farm truck and speed 
tractor drivers, and chauffeurs, 1023. 

Holidays : 

Canada — 

text of award of Hon. Mr. Justice C. P. 
McTague in meat packing dispute, re 
payment for statutory holidays, 1796. 

vacation fund established under recent col- 
lective agreement in clothing industry. 
1411. 

provisions of collective agreements in fish- 
ing industry, 1433, 1436, 1442. 

one day's rest in seven provided under col- 
lective agreement in fishing industry 
(salmon tendermen), 1433. 

payment for statutory holidays provided 
under collective agreement in rubber 
industry, 1411. 

summary of 1947 publication of Provincial 
Labour Standards, 1266. 

adoption of election day as statutory holi- 
day requested by C.C. of L., 500. 



Holidays — Con. 

resolution re statutory holidays, etc., 
adopted at convention of T. and L.C., 
1574. 

Alta.: provision of Elections Act re public 
holiday, 839; provisions of Labour Act, 
844; recommendations of Federation of 
Labour, 259. 

B.C.: amendments in Shops Regulations and 
Weekly Half-holiday Act, 1018; regula- 
tions under Act, 1335. 

Man.: Winnipeg employees to close simul- 
taneously for holidays, 917; regulations 
under Minimum Wage Act governing 
public holidays for women workers in 
factories, shops, offices, hotels and 
restaurants, 553. 

Sask.: regulations under Annual Holidays 
Act (1944), 846; inclusion of certain 
classes under One Day's Rest in Seven 
Act, 1336; amendment in Minimum 
Wage Act re pay for public holidays, 
1492. 

United Kingdom: agreement for public holi- 
days with pay in building and civil 
engineering contracting industries, 
1414; increase in number of public 
holidays with pay for farm workers in 
England and Wales, 1892; provisions of 
Holidays Order governing minimum 
rates and holidays for restaurant 
workers, 1346. 

U.S.A.: advantages of plant-wide vacations in 
factories and shops, 920; holiday for 
each employee oq birthday or anniver- 
sary, granted by small manufacturing 
firm, 1758; holiday on all state, national 
primary and general election days, 
favoured by A.F. of L., 1774. 
See also: Vacations with Pay. 

Home Work: 

U.S.A.— 

abolition recommended at National Con- 
ference on Labour Legislation, 206; 
regulation of industrial home work in 
New York state, 1603. 

Hooper, R. H., Industrial Relations Officer, 
Department of Labour: 
report on labour conditions in Yellowknife, 
N.W.T., 1097. 

Hosiery Industry: 

United Kingdom — 

recommendation of Hosiery Working Party, 
157. 

Hospitalization : 

Canada — 

sick benefit and/or hospitalization fund 
established under recent collective 
agreement in clothing industry, 1411. 
recommendations of T. and L.C. re hos- 
pitalization and medical care in On- 
tario lumber camps, 1575. 

Alta.: hospital services for old age and blind 
pensioners and mothers receiving al- 
lowances, provided under Bureau of 
Public Welfare Act, 839; regulations 
under Act, 1497. 

Sask.: amendments to regulations under 
Hospitalization Act, 553. 700. 1026, 
1495; regulations under Act, 201; pro- 
visions of Hospitalization Services 
Plan, 280. 



INDEX 



Hotels and Restaurants : 

Man. — 

new regulations under Minimum Wage Act 
governing females and bellboys, 552'. 

United Kingdom: provisions of Wages Regu- 
lation Order and Holidays Order, 
governing restaurant workers, 1346. 

UjS.A.: legislation governing women employed 
in hotels and restaurants in New York 
state, 285-86. 
See also Legal Decisions. 

Hours of Work: 

recommendations of Building, Civil Engin- 
eering and Public Works Committee of 
I.L.O. at meeting in Brussels, 144. 

discussion by sub-committee at meeting of 
I.L.O. Committee on Petroleum, 3114. 

resolution adopted by UL.O. Industrial 
Committee on Coal Mining, 1119, and 
Inland Transport, 1122. 

resolution on reduced working hours sub- 
mitted at meeting of Textiles Commit- 
tee of I.L.O. in Brussels, 140. 
Canada — 

standard or normal working hours in cer- 
tain industries: 
agricultural implements, 1532. 
brewery products, 994, 997. 
edible plant products — flour milling, 
1854, 1855; bread and cake baking. 
1855 1857; biscuit manufacturing. 
1858, 1860; confectionery manu- 
facturing, 1861, 1863. 
electrical machinery and apparatus, 

1724; radio sets and parts, 1728. 
lumber and lumber products, 1374. 
meat products, 1851. 
motor vehicles, 1169. 
motor vehicle parts and accessories, 

1532. 
pulp and paper, 988. 
rubber products, 1164. 

provisions of collective agreements in fish- 
ing industry, 1434, 1442. 

average hours worked per week for wage- 
earners in manufacturing industries. 
952. 

text of award of Hon. Mr. Justice C. P. 
McTague in meat packing dispute, 1793. 

man hours and hourly earnings as reported 
rto D.B. of S., 85, 722, 871, 1523, 1713, 
1845. 

determination of unemployment insurance 
contributions for five-day or forty-hour 
week, 1757, 1812. 

summary of 1947 publication of Provincial 
Labour Standards, 1266. 

establishment of 40-hour week recommended 
by C.C. of L., 500; resolution adopted. 
1581. 

forty-hour work week for employees in 
corporations and undertakings within 
government jurisdiction, requested by 
T. and L.C., 496; remarks of Minister 
of Reconstruction and Supply, 497; of 
Minister of Labour, 498; resolution 
adopted at convention, 1574. 
Alta.: provisions of new Labour Act (con- 
solidation ot Hours of Work Act, etc.), 
836, 843; exemption of truck drivers 
and helpers, and highway construction 
workers, from regulation under Labour 
Act and Male Minimum Wage Order 1, 
1333; recommendations of Federation 
of Labour, 259. 



Hours of Work — Con. 

Hours of Work Act — 

irrigation workers, 3>80, 844; sawmills, -843. 

B.C.: Order 25 A under Male and Female 
Minimum Wage Acts, 1334; orders 
under Minimum Wage Act and Hours 
of Work Act re overtime in shops for 
Christmas season, 60, 18(16; Court of 
Appeal holds that forty-four hour week 
applies to metal mines, 702; Vancouver 
early closing by-law invalid under 
Shops Act, 1029. 

Hours of Work Act — 

working hours of employees on three gov- 
ernment road-building projects extend- 
ed by three orders (32, 32A and 32B), 
1024; regulation 17B re overtime in 
baking industry, 1817; overtime in 
shops for Christmas season, 60, 1816; 
regulations governing certain industrial 
■undertakings, 198; addition of new 
occupations to schedule of Act, 1682, 
cemetery workers, 60; application of 
Act to C.P.R. hotel in Victoria, 700. 

Man.: new regulations under Minimum Wage 
Act governing male and female work- 
ers, 553; early closing by-law under 
Shops Act cannot apply to Winnipeg, 
1029; non-adoption of Bill re industrial 
undertakings, 1023-24. 

Ont.: amendments in Hours of Work and 
Vacations with Pay Act, 841, 842; 
amendment in Act re flower, fruit and 
vegetable growers, 1186. 

Que: administration of Industrial and Com- 
mercial Establishments Act during 
1945, 1688; amended regulations under 
Act re workers in compressed air, 1683- 
84. 

Sask.: provisions of Hours of Work Act, 
1490, 1817; amendments in Act, 1336, 
1493; regulations under Act re exemp- 
tions, shops, city hospitals, creameries, 
garages, oil-trucks, airport construction, 
newspapers, buses and street cars, 
chartered accountants, 1186-88; regu- 
lations under Apprenticeship Act 
(1944), 1336; inclusion of certain 
classes under One Day's Rest in Seven 
Act, 1336; new orders under Minimum 
Wage Act, 1027; provisions of Fire 
Departments Platoon Act, 1495. 

Australia: standard hours reduced to forty — 
award of Commonwealth Court of Con- 
ciliation and Arbitration, 1596-1600; 
forty-hour week in New South Wales, 
1249. 

United Kingdom: ratification of I.L.O. con- 
vention governing statistics of wages 
and hours of work, 1123; five-day week 
in coal mines, 632; coal production 
under five-day week, 918; reduction in 
standard work-week for farm workers 
in England and Wales, 1892; five-day 
week for machinists and related work- 
ers, 7; guaranteed work week in iron 
and steel industry, 7; provisions of 
agreements negotiated by National 
Maritime Board re post-war employ- 
ment conditions in merchant ships, 633 ; 
provisions of Factories (Hours of 
Employment in Factories Using Elec- 
tricity) Order, 1413; annual report 
(1945) of Inspector of Factories, 149. 



INDEX 



Hours of Work — Con. 

U.S.A.: federal-state co-operation in enforce- 
ment of labour laws, 1758; report on 
soft-coal strike resulting from demand 
for reduced work week, 9; provisions 
of new collective agreements in coal 
mines, 1099-1100; effects of long work- 
ing hours on efficiency, absenteeism, 
industrial injuries and output, 1445; 
enforcement of Fair Labour Standards 
Act and Public Contracts Act in 1946, 
778; state laws on employment of 
children in Georgia, Massachusetts and 
New York, 62; legislation governdng 
women employed in domestic service, 
factories, and hotels and restaurants, 
in New York state, 285-86; recommend- 
ations of National Conference on 
Labour Legislation. 207; shorter work- 
day favoured by A.F. of L., 1774. 

House of Commons Standing Committee on 
Industrial Relations: 

hears evidence on Bill to replace W.L.R.R. 
and I.D.I. Act, 1102-7. 

Houseworkers : 

See National Institute of Houseworkers. 

Housing: 

recommendation of Building Committee of 
I.L.O. re sanitary provisions in rural 
housing, 145. 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Coal Mining concerning 
miners' housing, 1118. 
Canada — 

amendments in National Housing Act 
(1944), 1328. 

functions of Citizens' Committees, 387. 

continuation of wartime community centres, 
280. 

housing conditions in Canada reviewed bv 
Rt. Hon. C. D. Howe, Minister of 
Reconstruction and Supply, in state- 
ment to House of Commons, 300. 

decrease in housing activity in 1947, 954. 

new housing completed in 1946 — statistical 
report of D.B. of S., 629; revised 
figures, 774. 

housing in coal mining communities 
described in report of Royal Commis- 
sion on Coal, 305. 

amendments to National Housing Act 
requested by C.C.C.L., 502, 1588. 

legislative recommendations of C.C. of L., 
499, remarks of Rt. Hon. C. D. Howe, 
Minister of Reconstruction and Supply, 
50iO; of Pat Conroy, 501; of A. R. 
Mosher, 501; other recommendations, 
1583. 

legislative recommendations of T. and L.C., 
49'6; remarks of Minister of Recon- 
struction and Supply, 497; other recom- 
mendation, 1575. 
Man.: amendment in Brandon Charter, 1023. 
U.S.A.: decrease in housing activity in 1947, 
954; development in nousing co-oper- 
atives in 1946, 658-59, 1446; provision 
of extensive housing program sought 
by A.F of L., 1774; resolution adopted 
bv C.I.O., 1776. 



Howe, Rt. Hon. C. D., Minister of Recon- 
struction and Supply: 
reports tabled in House of Commons: 
production outlook for basic and build- 
ing materials in Canada, 505. 
Research and Scientific Expenditure of 
Dominion Government (1938-1946), 503. 
Forecast of 1947 Investment by Canadian 
Business, 504. 
statement in House of Commons on hous- 
ing conditions in Canada, 300. 
on continuation of wartime community 

centres, 280. 
reply to Dominion legislative proposals of 

C.C. of L., 500-01. 
extracts from address at convention of 
T. and L.C., 1569; reply to Dominion 
legislative proposals, 497. 

Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting Com- 
pany: 

provisions of Act respecting wages and 
working conditions, 1326 . 

Human Motivation in Industry: 

summary of report, 14. 

Hygiene : 

See Industrial Hygiene. 

Immigration : 

See Migration and Settlement. 
Immigration-Labour Inter-departmental 
Committee: 

membership, 772. 

Imperfect Union Shop: 

Que.— 

definition. 135; number of agreements of 
C.C.C.L., T. and L.C., C.C. of L. and 
other unions, containing imperfect 
union shop provisions, 135. 

Incentive Wage Plans: 

Canada — 
number of plants in certain industries re- 
porting production or incentive bonus 
plans: — 

agricultural implements, 1538. 
electrical machinery and apparatus, 

1726. 
motor vehicle parts and accessories, 

1535. 
radio sets and parts, 1726. 
wooden furniture, 1386. 

Australia: favoured by tripartite industrial 
conference as measure to increase pro- 
duction, 1416. 

U.S.A.: effects of long working hours on 
workers under incentive system, 1446; 
discharge provided for in incentive 
scheme for sheet metal workers, 1249. 

Income: 

Canada — 

national income and expenditure — reports 

issued by D.B. of S., 311, 1866. 
working wives, their income, and the new 

income tax, 293-97. 
farm income during 1946, 487. 
maintenance of high level of farm income, 

increases farm wage rates, 912. 
U.S.A.: per capita income in the southern 

states, 18. 
Sec also Labour Income. 



INDEX 



Income Tax: 

Canada — 

relation of wage increases, and income tax 
deductions, 6. 

"strike pay" exempt from income tax, 483. 

effect of 1947 income tax rate on net com- 
bined incomes of working couples, 293- 
97. 

recommendations of C.C.C.L., 502, 1587. 

increased exemptions recommended by C.C. 
of L., 500; resolution adopted by, 1581. 

legislative recommendations of T. and L.C., 

496; remarks of Minister of External 

Affairs, 497; other recommendation, 

1575. 

Alta.: recommendations of Federation of 

'Labour, 259. 
B.C.: legislative resolution, 1020. 
U.S.A.: economic report of President Tru- 
man, 512; increased exemptions recom- 
mended by C.I.O., 1776. 

See also Taxation. 

Income War Tax Act: 

Canada — 

decisions of N.W.L.B. re wage increases, 

and income tax deductions, 6. 
legislative recommendations of R.T.B., 955. 

India: 

eighth conference on labour legislation — 
review of constitutional arrangement, 
administration, etc., 1688. 

Industrial Accident Prevention Associations 
of Ontario : 

proceedings of 1946 annual meeting and 

convention, 292. 
memorandum on workmen's compensation 

a® a factor in industrial costs, 557. 
report increase in injuries to young 

workers, 631. 

Industrial and Commercial Establishments: 

See Commercial Establishments. 

Industrial Classifications: 

See Occupational Classifications. 

Industrial Committees : 

See International Labour Organization. 

Industrial Conditions: 

United Kingdom — 

survey of major industries by tripartite 
working parties — recommendations for 
increasing efficiency in the pottery, cot- 
ton, boot and shoe, hosiery and furni- 
ture industries, 154-58. 
See also Conditions of Employment. 
Industrial Design: 

See Design in Industry. 

Industrial Development : 

United Kingdom — 

survey of major industries by tripartite 
working parties — recommendations for 
increasing efficiency in the pottery, 
cotton, boot and shoe, hosiery, and 
furniture industries, 154-58. 

Industrial Diseases: 

See Diseases, Industrial. 



Industrial Disputes: 

work stoppages increased in five countries 
in 1946, 1101. 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Inland Transport, 1121. 
Canada — 

Industrial Relations Bill, No. 338 (Indus- 
trial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act) designed to replace W.L.R.R. 
and I.D.I. Act — summary of provisions, 
923; major differences between pro- 
visions of Bill >and provisions of P.C. 
1003, 927; statement of Minister of 
Labour, 927; statements by labour 
organizations, 928; text of Bill, 930 ; 
hearings of House of Commons Indus- 
trial Relations Committee, 1102-7. 

Bill to provide for the Investigation, Con- 
ciliation and Settlement of Disputes 
not passed, 1328. 

causes of work stoppages in coal mining 
industry reviewed in report of Royal 
Commission on Coal, 310. 

abolition of order providing for taking of 
strike votes at request of employer, 
urged by C.C. of L., 499. 

legislation prohibiting the use of injunc- 
tions, recommended by T. and L. C, 
496; recommendation re detective 
agencies and labour disputes, 497. 

Alta.: provisions of new Labour Act (con- 
solidation of Industrial Conciliation 
and Arbitration Act, etc.), 837, 843. 

B.C.: provisions of new statute, Industrial 
Conciliation >and Arbitration Act 
(1947), 1013. 

N.S.: provisions of new Trade Union Act. 
1328; appointment of conciliation 
officers authorized under Fishermen's 
Federation Act, 1330. 

Ont.: provisions of Fire Departments Act 
and Police Act concerning collective 
bargaining and arbitration, 841; enact- 
ment of Labour Relations Act, 840. 

Que.: administration of Trade Disputes Act, 
Labour Relations Act and Public Ser- 
vices Employees' Disputes Act, in 1945, 
1685-86; amendments in Trade Dispute* 
Act re municipal and school employees. 
1488: statistics for 1945, 117. 

Australia: policy of Joint Coal Board estab- 
lished to administer measures to remedy 
conditions in coal industry in New 
South Wales, 1416; reduction of dis- 
putes through established system of 
conciliation and 'arbitration urged at 
tripartite industrial conference, 1416. 

United Kingdom: conciliation machinery' in 
building industry, 7-9)1, 792; in coal 
mining industry, 513. 

India: provisions of Industrial Disputes 
Act (1947), 1730. 

Italy: mediation machinery established in 
all plants — compulsory creation of 
factory commissions, 1250. 



INDEX 



Industrial Disputes — Con. 

U.S.A.: enactment of Labour-Management 
Relations Act, 943-48; President's 
message of disapproval, 943; appoint- 
ment of conciliation panel, 125; 
"escape" clause included in new- 
agreements in coal mines, 1100; 
increase of voluntary arbitration 
during 1946, 638; enactment of legis- 
lation governing disputes in public 
utilities, 1414; arbitration procedure 
established in building trades, 282; 
dissolution of N.W.L.B. and review 
of wartime activities concerning in- 
dustrial disputes, 285; recommenda- 
tions of Labour-Management Advisory- 
Committee, 10; recommendations of 
National Association of Manufac- 
turers, 10; Supreme Court upholds 
bargaining rights of foremen, 492; 
agreement reached between Western 
Electric Company and Association of 
Communications Equipment Workers, 
778; compulsory arbitration in public 
utilities in Indiana and New Jersey, 
638. 

See also Conciliation and Labour Act; 
Jurisdiction Disputes. 

Industrial Disputes Inquiry Commissions: 

appointment provided under proposed In- 
dustrial Relations and Disputes Investi- 
gation Act, 926. 

reports of Commissions on disputes, be- 
tween : 

Alberta Wheat Pool, Vancouver, 1466. 

Bennett Limited and Associated Com- 
panies and Lynn Innersole and 
Chambly Industries, Limited, 'Chambly 
Canton and Chambly Basin, 982. 

Canada Coach Lines. Limited, Hamilton, 
1466, 1654. 

Canada Steamship Lines, Limited, Colonial 
Steamship Company, Limited, and 
Sarnia Steamship Company, Limited. 
1155, 1292. 

Canadian Pacific Railway (Brotherhood 
of Sleeping Car Porters), 1466, 1653. 

Children's Shoe Manufacturing Company, 
Limited, Quebec, 981. 

Dominion Electric Company, Toronto, 358 
(appointment of Commission) . 

Industrial Glass Works Company, Limited, 
Montreal, 983. 

Lounsbury Company Limited, Moncton, 
822, 1295. 

Niagara Falls General Hospital, Niagara 
Falls, 822. 

Norton-Palmer Hotel, Windsor, 822. 

Seeley Products, Windsor, 358. 

Shipping Federation of Canada and the 
Shipowners' Association (Deepsea) of 
British Columbia, 1789. 

Smith Brothers Motor Body Works, 
Toronto, 821. 

Thetford Foundry, Limited, Thetford 
Mines, 981. 

Union Cab Company, Limited, Sudbury, 
822. 

Weldrest Hosiery Company, Limited, 
Farnham, 982. 



Industrial Disputes Investigation Act: 

review of legislation enacted in 1907, 640. 

summary and text of Industrial Relations 
Bill No. 338 (Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act) 
designed to replace I.D.I. Act, 923, 
940; hearings of House of Commons 
Industrial Relations Committee, 
1102-7. 
N.S.: provisions of new Trade Union Act 
and repeal of I.D.I. Act, 1328. 

Industrial Efficiency: 

United Kingdom — 

6urvey of major industries by tripartite 
working parties — recommendations for 
increasing efficiency in the pottery, 
cotton, boot and shoe, hosiery and 
furniture industries, 154-58. 

Industrial Establishments : 

See Commercial Establishments; Hours of 
Work; Overtime. 

Industrial Health: 

See Health. 

Industrial Hygiene : 

Canada — 

legislative recommendations of C.C. of L., 
499. 
Que.: report of Director (1941-43), 1664. 

Industrial Injuries: 

See Accidents. 

Industrial Organization Bill (United King- 
dom) : 

provisions of proposed legislation, 280. 

Industrial Production Co-operation Board: 

report on activities for quarter ending 
December 31, 1946, 124. 

survey shows results of labour-management 
co-operation, 625. 

sponsors filmstrip A Man With a Plan 
as instrument to stimulate interest in 
labour-management production com- 
mittees, 1003. 

Industrial Productivity : 

See Productivity. 

Industrial Relations: 

Canada — 
reference to proposed legislation (Bill 338), 

1093. 
See also Labour Relations. 

Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act : 

summary of provisions, 923; application 
of Act, 924, 938; text of Bill, 930; 
hearings of House of Commons Indus- 
trial Relations Committee, 1102-7. 

Industrial Relations Committee: 

See House of Commons Standing Committee 
on Industrial Relations. 

Industrial Standards Act (Alberta) : 

agreements, 189, 547, 827, 1663. 

provisions of new Labour Act (consolida- 
tion of Industrial Standards Act, 
etc.), 837, 843. 

Industrial Standards Act (Nova Scotia): 

agreements, 1 4 7 ~> . 



INDEX 



Industrial Standards Act (Ontario) : 

agreements, 188, 546, 827, 1176, 1475, 

1663. 
amendments, 842. 

Industrial Standards Act (Saskatchewan) : 

agreements, 1476', 1663. 
amendments, 1493. 

Industrial Statistics: 

See Employment and Industrial Statistics; 
Statistics. 

Industrial Welfare: 

recommendations of Textile Committee of 
I.L.O., 141. 

Canada — 

increase in health programs in industry, 

1756. 
welfare fund for coal miners described in 
report of Royal Commission on Coal, 
306. 
working conditions in the rubber products 
industry, 1164; in the motor vehicles 
industry, 1169. 
activities of Industrial Health Division, 
described in annual report of Depart- 
ment of National Health and Welfare, 
488. 

Man.: provisions of Garment Manufac- 
turers' and Employees' Fund Act, 
1023. 

Australia: policy of Joint Coal Board 
established to administer measures to 
remedy conditions in coal industry in 
New South Wales, 1416. 

United Kingdom: meals for workers in 
British factories, 918. 

U.S.A.: paid vacations and sick leave in 
1945-46, 1602; collective bargaining 
developments in union health and 
welfare plans, 1126; provision of 
health and welfare plans in collective 
agreements, 319; health and welfare 
provision of new agreements in coal 
mines, 1099-1100; regulation of indus- 
trial homework in New York state, 
1603. 
See also Conditions of Employment. 

Industry: 

Canada — 

establishment of Royal Commission to 
study creation of new industries in 
Maritime provinces, recommended by 
T. and L.C., 497. 

thirteenth report on organization in in- 
dustry, commerce and the professions, 
1413. 

summary of booklet on Noise and Vibra- 
tion Control, 789. 

use of colour to promote safety in factories, 
789. 
United Kingdom: summary of report on 

human motivation in industry, 14. 
U.S.A.: Clean Air (Removal of Dust) — 
summary of pamphlet issued by 
Department of Labour, 835. 

See also Factories. 

Inflation: 

Canada — 

preventing inflation — report of C.M.A., 

1114. 
U.S.A.: authority to reimpose controls in 

fight against inflation, sought by 

President Truman, 1757. 



Information Service : 

See Occupational Information Service. 

Ingersoll-Rand Company Limited: 

See Canadian Ingersoll-Rand Company 
Limited. 

Injunctions : 

Canada — 

legislative recommendations of C.C. of L., 
500. 

legislation prohibiting use of injunctions 
in labour disputes, recommended by 
T. and L.C., 496; other recommenda- 
tion, 1575. 

Inland Transport: 

second meeting of I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Inland Transport, in 
Geneva, Switzerland, 138, 1120. 

reports on items on agenda of I.L.O. — 
General Report, Man-power, Indus- 
trial Relations, and Statistics in 
Inland Transport, 316. 

Inspections : 

See Boilers; Commercial Establishments; 
Factories; Labour Inspection; 
Lumbering. 

Insurance : 

Canada — 

extended coverage under Veterans' Insur- 
ance Act, 387. 

U.S.A.: group insurance coverage, 1099: 
insurance companies report progress 
under consumers' co-operative move- 
ment, 396; comprehensive insurance 
plan for New York metal workers. 
778. 

Inter-American Conference on Social 
Security: 

agenda, etc., 778. 

International Affairs : 

resolution of C.C. of L., 1578-79. 
See also United Nations. 

International Association of Governmental 
Labour Officials of the United 
States and Canada : 

thirtieth convention, 1566. 

International Labour Organization : 

functions reviewed in article on inter- 
national co-operation towards better 
standards of living, issued by United 
Nations, 145 

official relationship with United Nations, 
11. 

asked by United Nations to study trade 
union rights, 788; resolution approved, 
1764. 

Canada ratifies Instrument for the Amend- 
ment of the Constitution of the 
International Labour Organization 
and the Final Articles Revision Con- 
vention (1946), 1122. 

ratifications of conventions by Switzerland, 
Colombia, United Kingdom, and 
China, 1123. 

re-admission of Austria, 1594. 

co-operation between Australian Common- 
wealth and state Labour Departments 
re obligations under amended Con- 
stitution of I.L.O., 1822. 



6384—3 



INDEX 



International Labour Organization — Con. 
recommendations of United States National 
Conference on Labour Legislation, re 
amended constitution of I.L.O., 206. 
extracts from address of A. D. Sitaal, at 
convention of T. and L.C., 1571. 
Twenty-ninth Conference — 

conventions and recommendations adopted 
at 29th session of Conference, tabled 
in Canadian House of Commons, 316. 
report of Canadian employers' delegate to 
C.M.A. convention, 1115. 
Thirtieth Conference — 

summary of proceedings, Canadian delega- 
tion, etc., 1592-95. 
report of C. H. Millard to convention of 
C.C. of L., 1584. 
Governing Body — 

proceedings of 101st session, and com- 
mittees, 786. 
Canadian appointments to committees, 
1765. 
Industrial Committees — 
resume of work of seven industrial com- 
mittees, given at 101st session of 
Governing Body, 786. 
analysis of work during first sessions, 

1765. 
Building, Civil Engineering and Public 
Works : 
first meeting in Brussels, 142; submis- 
sion of resolutions to Governments 
and United Nations authorized by 
Governing Body, 787. 
Coal Mining: 

second meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, 
138, 1116. 
Inland Transport: 

second meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, 
138, 1120. 
Iron and Steel: 

meeting (second session) in Stockholm, 
1706. 
Metal Trades: 

meeting (second session) in Stockholm, 
1770. 
Petroleum: 

meeting in Los Angeles, 138, 313. 
Textiles: 

first meeting in Brussels, 139: submis- 
sion of resolutions to Governments 
and United Nations authorized by 
Governing Body, 787. 
proposed establishment of committees on 
metal mining, timber and woodwork- 
ing, 787. 
Sixth International Conference of Labour 
Statisticians — 
summary of proceedings, 1595. 
Publications and Reports — 

reports on Inland Transport — General 
Report, Man-power, Industrial Rela- 
tions, and Statistics in Inland Trans- 
port, 316. 
The Organization of Labour Inspection in 
Industrial and Commercial Undertak- 
ings, 316. 
Employment Service Organization, 316. 
Teaching of Co-operation, at Laval 

University, 622. 
analysis of immigration regulations and 

policy in various countries, 647. 
analysis of work stoppages in five coun- 
tries in 1946, 1101. 



International Policy: 

United Kingdom — 

resolution adopted at convention of 
T.U.C., 1589. 

International Railway Brotherhoods: 

See Railway Transportation Brotherhoods. 

International Social Co-operation : 

text of article, reprinted from United 
Nations Weekly Bulletin, 145-48. 

Investment: 

Canada — 

report on Forecast of 19.'i7 Investment by 
Canadian Business, 504. 

Iron Industry : 

meeting (second session) of I.L.O. Com- 
mittee on Iron and Steel, in Stock- 
holm, 1766. 

Canada — 

recommendation of C.C. of L., 1585. 

United Kingdom: guaranteed work week in 
iron and steel industry, 7; measures 
to improve working conditions in iron 
foundries recommended in report of 
Joint Advisory Committee, 1780; 
resolution defeated at convention of 
T.U.C., 1589. 

Irrigation Workers: 

See Hours of Labour. 

Isaacs, Rt. Hon. George, Minisltr of Labour 
and National Services (United King- 
dom) : 
extracts from address at annual confer- 
ence of T.U.C., 1589. 

Italy: 

mediation machinery established in all 
plants — compulsory creation of factory 
commissions, 1250. 

statement of Italian General Confederation 
of Labour, 1778. 

Janitors: 

Canada — 

bilingual training school for janitors and 
elevator operators opened in Montreal, 
917. 

Japan: 

resolution of Textiles Committee of I.L.O. 
re development of textiles industry in 
Japan, 141. 

Japanese: 

statement of Prime Minister on Japanese 

policy, 122. 
discontinuance of Government aid for 

repatriation to Japan, 1411. 
summary of report on Re-establish went of 

Japanese in Canada, 19^-J f 6, 785. 
closing of Japanese placement hostel at 

Moose Jaw, 1246. 

Job Classification: 

See Occupational Classifications. 

Job Evaluation: 

Canada — 

plan of Canadian Ingersoll-Rand Company, 
Limited, 1097. 



INDEX 



Job Orientation Training : 

Canada — 

induction program for government 
employees directed by C.V.T., 489. 

Jctintf Committees : 

See National Joint Committees. 

Joint National Conference of the Construc- 
tion Industry: 

conference proceedings, 298. 

Jolliffe, A. L., Director of Immigration, De- 
partment of Mines and Resources: 
statement at meeting of Standing Com- 
mittee on Immigration and Labour, 
779. 

Jurisdictional Disputes : 

U.S.A.— 

enactment of legislation to curb jurisdic- 
tional disputes, 1414. 

Juvenile Employment: 

application in Canada of conventions and 
recommendations adopted at 29th 
session of International Labour Con- 
ference, 316. 
protection of young workers urged by 
I.L.O. Industrial Committee on Inland 
Transport, 1122. 
Canada — 

summary of 1947 publication on Interna- 
tional Labour Conventions and juvenile 
employment laws, 1266. 
functions of Community Youth Place- 
ment Centres established by N.E.S., 
642. 
recommendation of T. and L.C. re factory 
machine operators, 1575. 
Alta.: new regulations under Government 

Liquor Control Act, 60. 
N.S.: revised regulations under Factories 

Act, 1330. 
Ont.: increase in injuries to young workers 

reported by I.A.P.A., 631. 
Que.: activities of Employment Service 
during 1945-46, 1688; work permits 
issued during 1945-46, 1687, 1688. 
United Kingdom: scheme for training 
juveniles in skilled trades, 1567; 
provisions of Factories (Hours of 
Employment in Factories Using Elec- 
tricity) Order (1947), 1413; industrial 
accidents to young persons during 
1945, 151; Committee appointed to 
study two-shift system, recommends 
amendments in Employment of Women 
and Young Persons Act (1936), 1268. 
U.S.A.: liability of juvenile workers to 
machine accidents, 1248; enforcement 
of Fair Labour Standards Act and 
Public Contracts Act in 1946, 778; 
resolution reiterating previous recom- 
mendations, adopted at conference on 
labour legislation, 205; improved 
legislation sought by National Com- 
mission on Children and Youth, 283; 
minimum age for employment in 
specified hazardous occupations in 
state of Maine, 1737; appointment of 
wage boards to recommend revision 
of minimum rates for women and 
minors in hotel, restaurant and 
laundry industries in New York 
state, 11. 



Kelley, Lee A., K.C., Law Society of Upper 

Canada : 
summary of submission to House of 
Commons Industrial Relations Com- 
mittee, 1102. 

Kilbourn, F. B., Steel Controller: 
appointment terminated, 124. 

King, Rt. Hon. W. L. Mackenzie, Prime 
Minister of Canada: 

statement of government policy re immi- 
gration, 644. 

statement on Japanese policy, 122. 

text of telegram to convention of T. and 
L.C, 1569; remarks at presentation of 
Dominion legislative program, 494. 

Labour Attaches : 

Canada — 

appointment requested by C.C. of L., 500. 

Labour Code : 

Canada — 

Industrial Relations Bill. No. 338 (Indus- 
trial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act) designed to replace W.L.R R. 
and I.D.I. Act — summary of provisions, 
923; major differences between pro- 
visions of Bill and provisions of P.C 
1003, 927; statement of Minister, of 
Labour, 927; statements by labour 
organizations, 928; text of Bill, 930; 
hearings of House of Commons Indus- 
trial Relations Committee, 1102-7. 

recommendations of C.M.A., 1114. 

legislative recommendations of C.C.C.L., 
502. 

enactment of national labour code urged 
by C.C. of L., 498, 1583. 

establishment of National Labour Code 
urged by T. and L.C, 495; remarks 
of Minister of Labour, 498. 

See also Labour Relations; Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations. 

Labour Conditions: 

See Conditions of Employment. 

Labour Day : 

Canada — 

message of Federal Minister of Labour. 
1241. 

extracts from message of Percy R. 
Bengough, President, T. and L.C, 
1242; of A. R. Mosher, President, 
C.C of L., 1242; of Gerard Picard, 
General President, C.C.C.L., 1244. 

Labour Departments and Bureaus: 

thirtieth convention of International Asso- 
ciation of Government Labour Officials 
of the United States and Canada, 
1566. 
Canada — 

The Department of Laoour and the Mining 
Industry — extracts from address by 
Deputy Minister of Labour at conven- 
tion of Canadian Institute of Mining 
and Metallurgy, 119. 

publications in Library of Federal Depart- 
ment of Labour, 113, 615, 1083, 1557. 

minutes of early labour meetings presented 
to Library of Department of Labour, 
1247. 



6384— 3i 



INDEX 



Labour Departments and Bureaus — Con. 
Re-establishment of Japanese in Canada, 

19JfJf-46 — report issued by Federal 

Department of Labour, 785. 
group pension plans issued by Annuities 

Branch, Department of Labour, 488. 
Alta.: establishment of Department of 

Labour recommended by Federation of 

Labour, 259. 
Man.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1946), 620. 
N.B.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1946), 1893. 
N.S.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1946), 1090. 
Que.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1944-45), 116; (1945-46), 1684. 
Sask.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1946), 769. 

Labour Disputes : 

See Conciliation and Labour Act; Indus- 
trial Disputes. 

Labour Exit Permits: 

Canada — 

discontinuance, 277. 

Labour-Farmer Co-operation : 

Man.— 

re establishment of joint organization of 
labour and farmers, 1412. 

Labour Force : 

report of Committee on Employment, 
Unemployment and the Labour Force 
submitted to International Confer- 
ence of Labour Statisticians, 1596. 
Canada — 

surveys directed by D.B. of S., 727, 1350. 

! composition and balance of labour force 

in coal mining industry described in 

report of Royal Commission on Coal. 

308. 

man-power situation in 1946 (with table 
and chart), 648, 650, 651-56. 

Labour Income: 

Canada — 

labour income in Canada for period 

January, 1946 to April, 1947, 1262. 
labour income in June, 1947, 1528. 
See also Income. 

Labour Inspection : 

The Organization of Labour Inspection in 
Industrial and Commercial Under- 
takings— publication of International 
Labour Office, 316. 

convention and recommendations adopted 
at thirtieth session of I.L.O., 1593. 
Que.— 

annual report of Department of Labour, 
1687. 

Labour Law: 

See Labour Legislation. 

Labour Legislation: 

thirtieth convention of International Asso- 
ciation of Government Labour Officials 
of the United States and Canada, 
1566. 



Labour Legislation — Con. 
Canada — 

recent regulations under Dominion and 
provincial legislation, 60, 196, 380, 551, 
696, 842, 1024, 1186, 1332, 1496, 1682, 
1816. 

enactments of Dominion Parliament during 
1947, 1093, 1325. 

labour enactments of provincial legisla- 
tions in 1947 — British Columbia, 1013; 
Manitoba, 1020. 

historical summary of Dominion and 
provincial conciliation and collective 
bargaining legislation, 639-42. 

summary of 1947 edition of Provincial 
Labour Standards governing child 
labour, holidays, hours of work, 
minimum wages, and workmen's com- 
pensation, 1266. 

review of 1947 publications on provincial 
labour standards, 1265. 

Federal and provincial labour laws affect- 
ing coal mines outlined in report of 
Royal Commission on Coal, 303. 

window cleaners' code prepared by Cana- 
dian Standards Association, 775. 

extracts from address of Nova Scotia 
Minister of Labour at Industrial 
Relations Conference, 1778. 

Labour Legislation and Industrial Rela- 
tions — summary of address at C.M.A. 
convention, 1115. 

recommendations of CM. A., 1114. 

annual National Conference on Labour 
and Social Legislation recommended 
by C.C. of L., 500; seeks uniformity 
of legislation, 1581. 
Alta.: provisions of Labour Act consolidat- 
ing Hours of Work Act, Male Minimum 
Wage Act, Female Minimum Wage 
Act, Labour Welfare Act, Industrial 
Standards Act, and Industrial Con- 
ciliation and Arbitration Act, 836-38, 
843. 
B.C.: labour enactments of provincial legis- 
lature, in 1947, 1013. 
Man.: labour enactments of provincial legis- 
lature in 1947, 1020. 
N.B.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1946), 1893. 
N.S.: labour enactments of provincial legis- 
lature in 1947, 1325; extracts from 
address of provincial Minister of 
Labour at Industrial Relations Con- 
ference, 1778. 
Que.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1945), 1684. 
Sask.: amendment in B.N A. Act urged in 

legislative resolution, 1496. 
N.W.T.: labour conditions in Yellowknife, 

1097. 
Australia: agenda before Conference of 
Commonwealth and state labour 
ministers, 1822. 
United Kingdom: increase in minimum wage 
and overtime rates, public holidays 
with pay, and reducti6n in work-week, 
for farm workers in England and 
Wales, 1892; draft health and welfare 
regulations for the pottery industry 
issued under authority of Factories 
Act, 1752. 



INDEX 



Labour Legislation — Con. 

India: eighth conference on labour legisla- 
tion — constitutional arrangement, ad- 
ministration, etc., 1688. 

U.S.A.: Lea Act ("anti-Petrillo" Law) 
ruled unconstitutional, 285; summary 
of state legislation in 1946, 62; 
federal-state co-operation in enforce- 
ment of labour laws, 1758; thirteenth 
national conference on labour legis- 
lation, 205; expansion of workmen's 
compensation laws, 1099; improved 
child labour legislation sought by 
National Commission on Children and 
Youth, 283; resolution adopted by 
C.I.O. re "anti-labour" legislation, 
1776; enactment of legislation 
debarring payment of unemployment 
compensation to strikers in state of 
Michigan, 1324; labour legislation 
enacted in New York state, 285-86; 
regulation of industrial homework in 
New York state, 1603. 

Labour-Management Co-operation: 

recommendations of Building, Civil 
Engineering and Public Works Com- 
mittee of I.L.O., 145. 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Inland Transport, 1121. 

report of International Labour Organiza- 
tion presented at second session of 
I.L.O. Industrial Committee on Metal 
Trades, 1772. 

resolution of sub-committee adopted at 
meeting of I.L.O. Committee on 
Petroleum, 315. 

Labour-Management Co-operation — report 
of International Labour Office pre- 
sented at second session of I.L.O. 
Industrial Committee on Iron and 
Steel, 1769. 
Canada — 

increase in number of production com- 
mittees, 625. 

Take it up with the L.M.P.C.—fi\m 
released by Department of Labour, 
1759. 

personal services — rehabilitation work of 
Citizens' Committees, 386 

report of Royal Commission on Coal, 
309-10. 

labour-management relations in the con- 
struction industry, 631. 

retirement pension plan of Dominion Stores 
Limited, 570. 

review of brochure on union-management 
co-operation at Lever Brothers 
Limited, issued by Institute of Indus- 
trial Relations, University of Toronto, 
632. 
Man.: provisions of Garment Manufac- 
turers' and Employees' Fund Act, 
1023. 
N.S.: remarks of provincial Minister of 
Labour at Industrial Relations Confer- 
ence of Maritime Bureau of Industrial 
Relations, 20. 
Australia: conclusions of tripartite indus- 
trial conference held to fashion 
industrial program to increase produc- 
tion. 1415. 



Labour Management Co-operation — Con. 
United Kingdom: summary of White Paper 
on Economic Considerations Affecting 
the Relation betiveen Employers and 
Workers, 511; role of management 
outlined in report on human motiva- 
tion in industry, 14-15; agreement for 
public holidays with pay in building 
and civil engineering contracting in- 
dustries, 1414; development of prin- 
ciple of personnel management noted 
in annual report of Factories Inspector 
(1945), 150; recommendations of 
T.U.C., 1589. 

Belgium: proceedings of National Confer- 
ence of Labour, 1605. 

India: establishment of Works Committees 
under Industrial Disputes Act (1947), 
1730. 

U.S.A.: enactment of Labour-Management 
Relations Act, 943-48, and President's 
message of disapproval, 943; need for 
improved labour-management relations 
emphasized in economic report of 
President Truman, 512; appointment 
of panel of labour relations experts to 
serve as special conciliators in indus- 
trial disputes, 125; success of manage- 
ment-labour time study and produc- 
tion methods, 1415; trend toward 
profit-sharing plans, 1757; establish- 
ment of joint training school for 
supervisors and workers, 490; findings 
of survey on collective bargaining with 
employer groups, 657; report on 
successful bonus plans drafted by 
U.A.W. and certain employers, 919; 
recommendations of Labour-Manage- 
ment Advisory Committee, 10; labour 
relations program adopted at fifty-first 
annual convention of National Associa- 
tion of Manufacturers, 10; summary 
of bulletin on Reconversion in Indus- 
trial Relations, 126. 

Labour-Management Production Commit- 
tees: 

Canada — 

quarterly report of Industrial Production 

Co-operation Board, 124. 
results of labour-management co-operation 

shown in survey, 625. 
Take it up ivith the L.M.P.C. — film 

released by Department of Labour, 

1759. 
benefits of committees depicted in filmstrip 

A Man With a Plan, 1003. 
poster and pay-envelope stuffer service set 

up by Industrial Relations Branch, 

Department of Labour, 1567. 
bulletin on potentialities of committees 

issued by Department of Labour, 1098. 
functions and progress of committees 

described at convention of T. and L.C., 

1572. 
India: establishment of Works Committees 

under Industrial Disputes Act (1947), 

1730. 

Labour-Management Relations Act (U.S.A.) : 

enactment. 943-48; President's message of 
disapproval, 943. 



INDEX 



Labour Movement: 

Canada — 
Le Mouvement Ouvrier Ganadien — book 
published by Department of Industrial 
Relations, Laval University, 917. 

Labour Officials: 

thirtieth convention of International Asso- 
ciation of Governmental Labour 
Officials of the United States and 
Canada, 1566. 

Labour Organization: 

Canada — 

Thirty-sixth Annual Report on Labour 
Organization in Canada, 1259. 

Labour Organizations: 

See Trade Unions. 

Labour Relations: 

recommendations of Building, Civil Engin- 
eering and Public Works Committee of 
I.L.O., at meeting in Brussels, 145. 

resolution of sub-committee adopted at 
meeting of I.L.O. Committee on Petro- 
leum, 315. 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Inland Transport, 1121. 

plan for collaboration between public auth- 
orities and employers' and workers' 
organizations, approved by Governing 
Body of I.L.O., 787. 

report of Committee of the Conference at 
thirtieth session of I.L.O., 1592. 
Canada — 

present position with respect to labour rela- 
tions legislation — historical summary of 
Wartime Labour Relations Regulations, 
940. 

Industrial Relations Bill. No. 338 (Indus- 
trial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act) designed to replace W.L.R.R. 
and I.D.I. Act — summary of provisions, 
923; major differences between pro- 
visions olf Bill and provisions of P.C. 
1003, 927; statement of Minister of 
Labour, 927; statements by labour 
organizations, 928; text of Bill, 930; 
hearings of House of Commons Indus- 
trial 'Relations Committee, 110.2-7. 

administration of legislation by Dominion 
and provinces, 772. 

statement of Minister of Labour on labour 
relations legislation, 484. 

establishment of Canada Labour Relations 
Board, 926, 938, 940; submission of 
C.C. of L. to House of Commons Indus- 
trial Relations Committee, 1103. 

industrial relations in coal industry — sum- 
mary of report of Royal Commission on 
Coal, 302, 309. 

labour-management relations in construction 
industry, €31. 

report of Annuities Branch, Department of 
Labour, on advantage of retirement 
pension plans for employees, 488. 

health program for employees of Bell Tele- 
phone Company of Canada, 1815. 

revised pension plan of Bristol-Myers Com- 
pany of Canada, Limited, 1094. 

retirement pension plan of Dominion 
Stores, Limited, 570. 



Labour Relations — Con. 

review of brochure on union-management 
co-operation at Lever Brothers Limited, 
issued by Institute of Industrial Rela- 
tions, University of Toronto, 632. 
pension plan of George Weston Limited, 

1501. 
annual meeting of C.M.A., 1114. 
Labour Legislation and Industrial Relations 
— summary of address at CM. A. con- 
vention, 1115. 
poster and pay envelope stuffer service set 
up by Industrial Relations Branch, 
Department of Labour, 1567. 
functions and purposes of Industrial Rela- 
tions Section, Montreal University, 
686. 
annual conference on Industrial Relations 

at Dalhousie University, 1778. 
Le Mouvement Ouvrier Ganadien — book pub- 
lished by Department of Industrial 
Relations, Laval University, 917. 
legislative recommendations of C.C.C.L., 
502; remarks of Minister of Labour, 
502; C.C.C.L., requests amendments to 
provincial Act (Quebec), 1587. 
resolutions adopted by C.C. of L., 1581. 
legislative recommendations of T. and L.C., 
495. 

B.C.: establishment of Board authorized under 
Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration 
Act, 1013. 

Man.: proclamation of Wartime Labour Rela- 
tions Regulations Act, 553; provisions of 
Garment Manufacturers' and Em- 
ployees' Fund Act, 1023; provisions of 
Acts to 'amend Wartime Labour Rela- 
tions Regulations Act, 1021; establish- 
ment of Labour Board under Depart- 
ment of Labour Act, 1021. 

N.B.: administration of Wartime Labour 
Relations Regulations during 1946, 
1894; proclamation of Wartime Labour 
Relations Regulations Act, 553. 

N.S.: modern industrial relation policies dis- 
cussed at conference of the Maritime 
Bureau of Industrial Relations, 20; 
eighth annual Industrial Relations 
Conference of the Maritime Bureau of 
Industrial Relations, 20; regulations 
under Trade Union Act, 1683; annual 
conference on Industrial Relations at 
Dalhousie University, 1778. 

Ont.: enactment of Act, 840; amendment in 
Labour Relations Board Act re 
W.L.R.R., 843. 

Que.: administration of Act in 1945, 1684, 
1685; annual report of Department of 
Labour (1945-46), 1684; annual report 
of Department of Labour (1944-45), 
116; survey of union security pro- 
visions in collective agreements, con- 
ducted by Industrial Relations Depart- 
ment of Laval University, 134-35. 

Sask.: annual report of Board (1946), 770: 
order of Labour Relations Board 
quashed on ground of suspicion of bias, 
705. 

India: administration of legislation in 1945, 
1730. 

Italy: mediation machinery established in all 
plants — compulsory creation of factory 
commissions, 1250. 



INDEX 



Labour Relations — Con. 

U.S.A.: appointment of panel of labour rela- 
tions experts to serve as special con- 
ciliators in industrial disputes, 125; 
trend toward profit-sharing plans, 1757; 
paid vacations and sick leave in 1945- 
46, 1602; establishment of joint train- 
ing school for supervisors and workers, 
490; state Labour Relations Board may 
not act in National Board's field even 
if National Board declines to act, 850'; 
findings of survey on collective bargain- 
ing with employer groups, 657; eleventh 
annual report of N.L.R.B., 635; collec- 
tive bargaining developments in union 
health and welfare plans, 112'6; enact- 
ment of Labour-Management Relations 
Act, 943-48; President's message of dis- 
approval, 943; application of State 
Labour Relations Act to certain per- 
sons employed by charitable, educa- 
tional or religious organizations in New 
York state, 285-86; arbitration pro- 
cedure established in building trades, 
282; administrative training course for 
supervisory employees instituted by 
Ford Motor Company, 1415; manage- 
ment-labour time study and production 
methods reported successful, 1415; pub- 
lication of journal by New York state 
School of Industrial Relations at 
Cornell University, 922; report on suc- 
cessful bonus plans drafted by U.A.W. 
and certain employers, 919 1 ; legislation 
governing public utilities in New 
Jersey, 62, in New York state, 62; 
recommendations of Labour-Manage- 
ment Advisory Committee, 16; program 
adopted at fifty-first annual convention 
of National Association of Manufac- 
turers, 10; recommendations of National 
Conference on Labour Legislation, 206; 
summary of bulletin on Reconversion in 
Industrial Relations, 126. 
See also Legal Decisions; National Labour 
Relations Board (U.S.A.) ; Wartime 
Labour Relations Board; Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations. 

Labour Representation: 

Canada — 

submission of C.C. of L. to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
1103; requests representation on Board 
of Directors of Bank of Canada, 1585. 



Labour Supply: 

resolutions adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Coal Mining concerning 
recruitment and related problems, 1117. 
Canada — 

review of man-power situation in 1946 

(with chart and tables), 648-56. 
current labour market conditions for women, 

296. 
suspension of order prohibiting entry into 
Canada of contract labour, 628. 
United Kingdom: appeal for women workers 

to reduce labour shortages, 918. 
U.S.A.: report on social, economic and trade 
union aspects of labour in southern 
states, 18. 

Labour Transference: 

Canada- 
travelling expenses of transferred workers, 

774. 
statement of Minister of Labour on trans- 
fer of unemployed persons from Nova 
Scotia, 625. 
transfer of workmen from Nova Scotia to 
central Canada, 277. 
U.S.A.: regulations governing migratory 
labour in New York state, 62. 

Labour Turn-over: 

U.S.A.— 

post-war turn-over of women workers in 
manufacturing industry, 637. 

Labour Unions: 

See Trade Unions. 

Labour Unity: 

Canada — 

resolution of C.C. of L., 1584. 
resolution adopted at convention of T. and 
L.C., 1574. 
U.S.A.: A.F. of L and C.I.O. discuss labour 
unity, 636. 

Labour Welfare: 

Alta.— 

provisions of new Labour Act (consolida- 
tion of Labour Welfare Act, etc.), 837, 
843. 



Labour Standards: 

Canada — 

window cleaners' code prepared by Cana- 
dian Standards Association, 775. 
review of 1947 publications on provincial 

labour standards, 1265. 
summary of 1947 edition of Provincial 
Labour Standards, governing child 
labour, holidays, hours of work, mini- 
mum wages and workmen's compensa- 
tion, 1266. 
Australia: recommendations of Conference of 
Commonwealth and state labour minis- 
ters, 1822. 
See also National Bureau of Standards. 

Labour Statistics: 

See Statistics. 



Labourers : 

Canada — 

immigration of workers from displaced 
persons' camps, 1467. 

Laundries : 

Canada — 

increase in wage rate index in 1946, 771. 

Laval University: 

review of treatise on extension courses in 

co-operation, published iby I.L.O. , 622. 
survey on types of union security provisions 

in collective agreements, 134-35. 
Le Mouvement Ouvrier Canadien, book 

published by Department of Industrial 

Relations, 917. 



xl 



INDEX 



Law Society of Upper Canada : 

summary of submission to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
11(02. 

Lea, H. W., Co-ordinator of Public Projects, 
Department of Reconstruction and 
Supply: 
text of paper on Timing of Puolic Invest- 
ment in Construction^ 128. 

Lea Act (U.S.A.) : 

ruled unconstitutional by Chicago District 
Court, 285. 

Legal Aid: 

Canada — 

rehabilitation work of Citizens' Commit- 
tees, 386. 

Legal Decisions : 

Canada — 

monthly summary of legal decisions affect- 
ing labour, 202. 381, 554, 700, 846, 1028, 
1337, 1500, 1818. 
Exchequer Court reverses decision of regis- 
trar of shop cards — directs registration 
of pressmen's label, 1818. 

B.C.: Court awards damages against boiler- 
makers' union for violating member's 
right to have application for reinstate- 
ment in union considered, 202'; Court 
will not interfere with expulsion of 
union member in accordance with union 
law, 554; application of Hours of Work 
Act to C.P.R. Hotel in Victoria, 700; 
Court of Appeal holds that forty-four 
hour week applies to metal mines, 702; 
worker wrongfully dismissed cannot col- 
lect damages for time off work if he 
seeks no other job, 1028; Vancouver 
early closing by-law invalid under 
Shops Act, 1029; trade union ruled 
legal entity. 1247; trade union within 
scope of Industrial Conciliation and 
Arbitration Act may be prosecuted 
under that Act- — strikers fined, 1337 ; 
Company fined for illegal lockout, 1339: 
workmen's, widows' claims against the 
Crown upheld by Supreme Court of 
Canada, 1339; Vancouver convictions 
for obstructing traffic quashed by 
Supreme Court of Canada. 1340; Court 
dismisses appeal of laundry workers' 
union — -holds union may be prosecuted 
under Conciliation Act, 1500; prosecu- 
tion of union held up until its legal 
status determined, 1818; Supreme Court 
rejects application for order to require 
official to produce union records," 1818; 
validity of Industrial Conciliation and 
Arbitration Act upheld in Supreme 
Court, 1819. 

Man.: early closing by-law under Shops Act 
cannot apply to Winnipeg, 1029. 

X.S.: Court holds fishermen not employees — 
labour regulations not applicable, 381- 
83. 

Ont.: workman's appeal against corporation 
of Toronto for # wages and failure to 
nrovide work, dismissed, 555. 



Legal Decisions — Con. 

Que.: Court holds that company liable for the 
compensation awarded the employee of 
another may require his examination by 
its physician, 846; bus boys in Montreal 
restaurant are employed by waiter not 
by proprietor, 847; damages awarded 
in Montreal for wrongful expulsion 
from union, 847; Appeal Court quashes 
conviction for dismissing trade union- 
ists, 1340; injunctions in shoe factory 
strike, 1340-41; Court dismisses shoe 
employers' application for restraint of 
collective bargaining during agreement, 
1820. 

Sask.: Labour Relations Board has no status 
to appeal question of jurisdiction — un- 
registered union lacks capacity to 
appear in Court, 203; Court holds fore- 
man not employer as defined by Mini- 
mum Wage Act, 555; failure of tele- 
grapher to follow procedure prescribed 
by agreement loses action for wrongful 
dismissal, 704; order of Labour Rela- 
tions Board quashed on ground of sus- 
picion of bias, 705; award of Saskatoon 
municipal pension not reviewable by 
Court, 848; post-office workers hired by 
postmaster are subject to Minimum 
Wage Act, 847; Supreme Court holds 
Labour Relations Board has legal 
status for purposes of Trade Union 
Act, 1341 ; brakeman's widow loses 
claim against railway company, 1342; 
switchman allowed damages for negli- 
gence of Railway Company — latter's 
appeal dismissed, 1342; labour laws 
held not to apply to Interprovincial 
Railway Companies, 1343; appeal drop- 
ped as provincial authority in labour 
relations resumed, 1821. 

Australia: standard hours reduced to forty — 
award of Commonwealth Court of Con- 
ciliation and Arbitration, 1596-1600. 

United Kingdom: House of Lords holds reg- 
ular employer liable for negligence of 
workman temporarily hired to another. 
204; workman allowed to start after 
contractual hour is in "course of 
employment" when on way to work 
after the hour, 1345; introduction of 
Bill to permit actions against the 
Crown, 776; English Court of Appeal 
upholds damages award for failure to 
fence machinery in motion, 849; dam- 
ages for breach of Factories Act in 
dusty trade, 850; English employer, not 
workman, held liable for overloading 
crane, 1821; English Court awards 
damages against employers for statutory 
breaches, 1344; disability compensa- 
tion to be based on actual rates before 
and after accident regardless of eco- 
nomic changes, 1345 

U.S.A.: ruling by Supreme Court re collec- 
tion of portal-to-portal pay, 8; Court, 
upholds Government's action in soft- 
coal strike, 9; Pennsylvania Supreme 
Court rules unemployment benefits be 
denied when open shop employment 
refused, 125; Circuit Court holds 
worker's dismissal for "dual unionism'' 
under closed shop agreement unfair 
labour practice, 204; Supreme Court 
removes trainees from minimum wage 
regulations, 284; Court rules Lea Act 



INDEX 



xli 



Legal Decisions — Con. 

("anti-Petrillo" law) unconstitutional, 
285; soft coal miners comply with 
Supreme Court mandate, 492; Supreme 
Court upholds bargaining rights of 
foremen, 492; Supreme Court upholds 
discharge for communist sympathies, 
493; courts rule on veterans' re-em- 
ployment rights, 493; California Court 
rules that public servants should not 
belong to labour unions, 493; Supreme 
Court holds that employers must bar- 
gain with foremen's unions, 556; time 
spent in preparing for work too trifling 
to warrant damages under Fair Labour 
Standards Act, 55G; state Labour Rela- 
tions Board may not act in National 
Board's field even if National Board 
declines to act, 850'; shipbuilding com- 
pany required to pay for "portal" 
time, 921. 

Lever Brothers, Limited: 

review of brochure on union-management 
co-operation at Toronto plant, issued by 
Institute of Industrial Relations, Uni- 
versity of Toronto, 632. 

Lewis, John L., President, United Mine- 
workers of America: 
compliance with Supreme Court mandate, 
492. 

Libraries : 

Canada — 

publications in Library of Federal Depart- 
ment of Labour, 113, 615, 1083, 1557. 

minutes of early labour meetings presented 
to library of Department of Labour, 
1247. 

issuance of library catalogue by UI.C, 1191. 

Licensing of Workmen: 

Alta.— 

amendment in Act re licensing of motion 
picture machine operators, 839; 
amended regulation under Boilers Act, 
551. 

B.C.: regulations under Boiler Inspection 
Act, 1334. 

Que.: new licensing regulations under Elec- 
tricians and Electrical Installations 
Act, 1817. 

Sask.: new provisions under Electrical Inspec- 
tion and Licensing Act, 1493; amended 
regulations under Act, 201. 

Liens: 

See Mechanics Liens. 

Lighting : 

United Kingdom — 

improved lighting in coal mines — recom- 
mendation of Technical Advisory Com- 
mittee, 1444. 

Liquor: 

Alta.— 

new regulations under Government Liquor 
Control Act, 60. 
Ont.: regulations under Liquor Licence Act, 
200. 



Living Standards: 

See Standard of Living. 

Loans : 

Canada — 

loans approved under National Housing Act 
in 1945 and 1946, 300. 

amendments in National Housing Act 
(1944), 1328. 

provisions of Veterans Business and Pro- 
fessional Loans Act, 214-15. 

amendment to National Housing Act to 
lower cost of loans, requested by 
C.C.C.L., 502. 

Logging : 

See Lumbering. 

Lumbering: 

movement of farmers from Canada to 
United States to assist in woods oper- 
ations, 1764. 
Canada — 

man-power situation in 1946, 654. 

increase in wage rate index in 1946, 771. 

wage rates, hours and working conditions 
in the lumber and lumber products 
industries (1946), (sawmill products, 
planing mill, sash and door, and wooden 
furniture), 1374. 

employment of woods workers from dis- 
placed persons' camps, 1245, 1407. 

collective agreement makes employees of 
lumber firm liable for illegal strikes, 
911. 

recommendations of T. and L.C re hos- 
pitalization and medical care in Ontario 
lumber camps, 1575. 
Que : inspection of camps during 1941-43 — 
report of Division of Industrial 
Hygiene, 1664. 

Lyon, Brigadier J. E., Assistant Director, 
Canadian Vocational Training: 
remarks at conference of Vocational Train- 
ing Advisory Council on transfer of 
training from C.V.T. to D.V.A., 1072. 

Machinery: 

France — 

regulations to ensure safe working near 
dangerous machinery, 1417. 

Machinists : 

United Kingdom — 

five-day week for machinists and related 
workers, 7. 

Mackenzie, Rt. Hon. Ian, Minister of Vet- 
erans Affairs: 

on progress of rehabilitation of veterans 
during 1946, 915. 

on unemployment insurance contributions 
and benefits for veterans, 1812. 

announces proclamation of Veterans Busi- 
ness and Professional Loans Act, 214. 



6384—4 



xlii 



INDEX 



MacNamara, Arthur, Deputy Minister of 
Labour: 

on the problem of the older worker, 1257. 

summary of article on employment of older 
workers, 4. 

extracts from address on the Department 
of Labour and the Mining Industry, 
119. 

on regulations under Unemployment Insur- 
ance Act requiring employers to report 
job vacancies, 483. 

statement on return of prisoners of war to 
Europe, 4. 

extracts from address at Dominion-Pro- 
vincial Farm Labour Conference, 5. 

remarks at conferences of Vocational Train- 
ing Advisory Council, 854, 1670. 

Maintenance of Membership: 

definition, 135. 

Canada — 

text of award of Hon. Mr. Justice C. P. 
McTague in meat packing industry, 
1793. 

Que.: number of 'agreements of C.C C.L., T. 
and L.C., C.C. of L., and other unions, 
containing maintenance-of-membership 
provisions, 135. 

U.S.A.: number of workers covered by main- 
tenance-of-membership provisions in 
1946, 910. 

Manitoba Sugar Company : 

admission of workers from Europe, for 
employment on sugar farms, 629. 

Man-power : 

resolutions adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Coal Mining concerning 
recruitment and related problems, 1117. 

Canada — 

review of man-^power situation in ,1946 (with 
chart and tables), 648-56. 

Australia: tripartite industrial conference 
urges men and women war workers to 
return to industry to alleviate pro- 
duction shortages, 1415. 

United Kingdom: summary of White Paper 
on Economic Survey for 19^7, 506. 

Manufacturing : 

Canada — 

report (with charts and tables) on post- 
war trend of real and money earnings 
in manufacturing, 949-53. 

increase in wage rate index in 1946, 771. 

high level of employment forecast, 911. 

man-power situation in 1946 in manu- 
facturing industries, 653. 

report of investigation under Combines 
Investigation Act into alleged combine 
in manufacture and sale of dental 
supplies, 1264. 

dismissal pay provided under recent collec- 
tive agreements in manufacturing 
industry, 1756. 

seasonal variations of employment in the 
automobile and parts industry, 287. 

wage rates, hours 'and working conditions 
in the rubber products industry, 1164; 
in the motor vehicles industry, H169. 

report on The Manufacturing Industries of 
Canada, 1945, issued by D. B. of S., 
1258. 



Manufacturing — Con. 

U.S.A.: earnings regain wartime peak, 635; 
agreements providing wage increases in 
manufacturing industry, 636; number 
of wage earners covered by collective 
agreements in 1946, 919; post-war turn- 
over of women workers, 637; liability 
of juvenile workers to machine acci- 
dents, 1248; report on labour supply 
in the southern states, 18; labour 
relations program adopted at fifty-first 
annual convention of National Associa- 
tion of Manufacturers, 10. 

Maple Sugar: 

movement of harvesters from Canada to the 
United States, 1763. 

Maritime Commission: 

See Canadian Maritime Commission. 

Marketing : 

Australia — 

proposed amendment to Constitution sub- 
mitted to Referendum, 286. 

Marshall, Herbert, Dominion Statistician: 

appointment as Canadian representative on 
I.L.O. Committee, 1765. 

presents brief at meetings of Standing 
Committee on Immigration and Labour, 
784. 
Martin, Hon. Paul, Minister of National 
Health and Welfare: 

announces Dominion-provincial old age pen- 
sions agreements, 1408. 

introduces legislation to amend Old Age 
Pensions Act re amounts payable and 
eligibility requirements, 914. 

directs establishment of Inter-departmental 
Committee to study health insurance 
for Federal Government employees, 
489. 

Matriculation : 

Canada — 

pre-matriculation classes under C.V.T.. 66, 
208, 210. 384, 560, 561, 712, 1031, 1189, 
1478, 1674. 

enrolment of veterans in pre-matriculation 
courses under C.V.T., 213, 558; number 
of veterans completing training in 
classes, 1756. 

remarks of Mr. OR. F. Thompson, Director, 
C.V.T., at conference of Regional Di- 
rectors, 1674. 

report on enrolment of veterans in pre- 
matriculation training, made at con- 
ference of Vocational Training Advis- 
ory Council, 855-56. 

booklet on Vocational and Pre-Matricula- 
tion Training of Canada's Veterans, 
issued by Department of Labour, 914. 

McCann, Hon. Dr. J. J., Minister of National 
Revenue: 
on decisions of N.W.L.B. re wage increases, 
and income tax deductions, 6. 

McCord, Charles, Director, Administrative 
Services, Department of Labour: 

appointment as substitute member of Ad- 
ministrative Board of I.L.O. Staff 
Pensions Fund, 1765. 

government representative at 101st session 
of Governing Body of I.L.O., 786. 



INDEX 



xliii 



McEachern, R. A., Editor, Financial Post Medical Services — Con 

(Toronto) : 
extracts from address at Industrial Rela- 
tions Conference oif the Maritime 
Bureau of Industrial Relations, 20. 



McGowan, J. S., Director, Department oj 

Colonization and Agriculture, C.N.R.: 

summary of submission to Senate Standing 

Committee on Immigration and Labour, 

1108. 

McTague, Hon. Mr. Justice C. P.: 

arbitration award in meat packing dispute, 
1753, 1791-96. 

Meals: 

See Canteens. 

Meat Packing Industry: 

Canada — 

arbitration award of Hon. Mr. Justice C. 
P. McTague in meat packing dispute, 
1753, 1791-96. 

U.S.A.: guaranteed wage established in pack- 
ing company, 125; revision of wage 
structures and job classifications, 28'3. 

Meat Products Industry: 

Canada — 

wage rates, hours and working conditions 
in the meat products and edible plant 
products industries, 1850. 

Mechanics Liens: 

Alta.— 

amendment in Mechanics Lien Act, 839. 

Mediation : 

See Arbitration; Conciliation. 

Medical Examinations: 

application in Canada of conventions and 
recommendations (re young workers) 
adopted at 29th session of International 
Labour Conference, 316. 
United Kingdom — 

regulations under Factories Act (1937) 
governing fees for medical examina- 
tions for employment, 1417. 

Medical Research: 

Canada — 
legislative recommendation of R.T.B. re 
scientific medical research, 955. 

Medical Services: 

Canada — 

sick benefit and/or hospitalization fund 
established under recent collective 
agreement in clothing industry, 1411. 

review of activities of Associated Medical 
Services, Inc., 1170. 

activities of Industrial Health Division, 
described in annual report of Depart- 
ment of National Health and Welfare, 
488. 

legislative recommendations of C.C. of L., 
499. 

recommendations of T. and L.C. re hospit- 
alization and medical care in Ontario 
lumber camps, 1575. 



Alta.: hospital services for old age and blind 
pensioners and mothers receiving allow- 
ances, provided under Bureau of Public 
Welfare Act, 839. 

N.S.: provisions of Company Doctors Act, 
1331. 

Que.: provisions of Act to encourage estab- 
lishment of physicians in country dis- 
tricts, 1489. 

Sask.: provisions of Hospitalization Services 
Plan, 280; amendments to Health Ser- 
vices Act, 1495, 1684; regulations under 
Hospitalization Act, 201, amended pro- 
visions, 1493; amended regulations un- 
der Public Health Act, 1336. 

U.S.A.: development of co-operative provision 
of medical care in 1946, 659, 1447; es- 
tablishment of Institute of Industrial 
and Social Medicine as industrial health 
unit, 922. 

See also Health; Sick Leave. 

Medicine : 

U.S.A.— 

establishment of Institute of Industrial and 
Social Medicine as industrial health 
unit, 922. 

Merchant Seamen: 
See Seamen. 

Metal Mining: 

See Mining. 

Metal Trades: 

meeting (second session) of I.L.O. Com- 
mittee on Metal Trades, in Stockholm, 
1770. 
United Kingdom — 

statistics re distribution of man-ipower in 
metals and engineering, 508. 
U.S. A.: comprehensive insurance plan for 
New York metal workers, 778. 

Migration and Settlement: 

I.L.O. report on immigration regulations 
and policy in other countries, 647. 

application of miners' invalidity and old 
age pensions schemes to immigrant 
workers, sought by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Coal Mining, 1120. 
Canada — 

government immigration policy outlined in 
statement of Rt. Hon. W. L. Mackenzie 
King, Prime Minister of Canada, 644. 

meetings of Standing Committee on Immi- 
gration and Labour — Senate studies im- 
migration problems, 779-85, 1108. 

report of Standing Committee on Immigra- 
tion and Labour, 1111. 

membership of Immigration-Labour Inter- 
departmental Committee, 772. 

N.E S. encourages Canadian employees to 
remain in Canada — statement of Min- 
ister of Labour, 771. 

immigration of workers from displaced per- 
sons' camps, 1245, 1407, 1562. 

arrival and placement of domestic workers 
from displaced persons' camps, 1562. 
\ immigration of Polish veterans, 628. 

increased number of Poles permitted entry 
to Canada, 775. 



6384— 4$ 



xliv 



INDEX 



Migration and Settlement — Con. 

admission of workers from Europe for 
employment in textile (Dionne Spinning 
Mill Company), and sugar beet indus- 
tries, 629, 1412. 

amendment in immigration regulations to 
include four new admissible classes, 122. 
J amendment in Immigration Act re depend- 
ents of members of Armed Forces, 1327. 

immigration during 1946, 280. 

increase in immigration during six-month 
period ending September 30, 1946, 122. 

repeal of Chinese Immigration Act, 1327. 

suspension of order prohibiting entry into 
Canada of contract labour, 628. 

attitude of C.M.A. towards immigration, 
1115. 

resolution adopted by CjCjCL., 1588; legis- 
lative recommendation, 502. 

resolution of C.C. of L., 1582; legislative 
recommendations, 499. 

legislative recommendation of R.T.B., 955. 

remarks of Hon. Humphrey Mitchell, 
Minister of Labour, at presentation of 
legislative program of T. and L. C, 
498. 
U.S.A.: Migrant Labour . . . A Human Prob- 
lem — summary of report released by 
Department of Labour, 921; recom- 
mendation of National Conference on 
Labour Legislation re living and work- 
ing conditions of migratory workers, 
207. 

Military Pay: 

See Wages 

Minimum Wages: 

Canada — 
summary of 1947 edition of Provincial 

Labour Standards, 1266. 
enactment of legislation providing for na- 
tional minimum wage requested by 
CjC. of L., 500. 

Alt a.: provisions of new Labour Act (con- 
solidation of Male and Female Mini- 
mum Wage Acts, etc.), 837, 843-44; 
exemption of truck drivers and helpers, 
and highway construction workers, from 
regulation under Labour Act, and Male 
Minimum Wage Order 1, 1333. 

B.C.: orders under Minimum Wage Act and 
Hours of Work Act governing overtime 
in shops for Christmas season, 1816. 
Female Minimum Wage Act — amendments 
in Act, 1018; No. 24 (mercantile in- 
dustry), 60; Order No. 24 (shops and 
offices), 845; Order No. 25 (manu- 
facturing), 198; Order 25A (pulp and 
paper industry), 1334; Order No. 27 
(beauty shops), 845; Order 28A (log- 
ging and sawmilling), 1334; No. 34 
(shops and offices), 845; Order No. 49 
(woodworking), 198; Order No. 51 
(household furniture manufacturing), 
198; Order No. 55 (box manufactur- 
ing), 198; Order No. 58 (carpenters), 
1334; Order No. 62 (shingle industry), 
198; Order No. 68 (Christmas tree 
industry), 845. 



Minimum Wages — Con. 

Male Minimum Wage Act — new section 
under Act, 1018; Order No. 1 (log- 
ging), 198, 1024, 1186 (amendment); 
No. 2 (apprentices), 1816; Order No. 
25 (manufacturing), 198; Order No. 
25A (pulp and paper industry), (13.34 ; 
Order No. 27 (beauty shops), 845; 
Order 28 A (logging and sawmilling)., 
1334; Order No. 47 (fruit and vegetable 
industry), 845; Order No. 49 (wood- 
working), 198; Order No. '50 (sawmill 
industry), 198; Order No. 51 (house- 
hold furniture manufacturing), 198; 
Order No. 52A (bell boys), 1816; Order 
No. 55 (box manufacturing), 198; Order 
No. 58 (carpenters), 1334; Order No. 59 
(mercantile industry), 60; Order No. 62 
(shingle industry), 198; Order No. 68 
('Christmas tree industry), 845. 
Man : new regulations under Minimum Wage 
Act, 551; amended regulations under 
Act, 697; administration of regulations 
during 1946 — annual report of Depart- 
ment of Labour, 621. 
N.B.: provisions of Minimum Wage Act 

(1945), 1894 
N.S.: Minimum Wage for Women Act- 
increase in wage rates, 1817. 
Ont.: new section under Act, non-adoption of 
amending Bill, 842; provisions of new 
order governing women workers within 
scope of Act, 697 ; order governing 
female employees of certain telephone 
companies, 1025. 
Que.: amendments in Act, 1487; administra- 
tion of Act in 1945-46, 1686; annual 
report of Department of Labour 
(1945), 116. 

Minimum Wage Commission — 

By-law B-l (assessments on employers), 
1682. 

By-laws B-l-B and B-l-C (levy on employers 
in timber-driving and forest opera- 
tions), 1683. 

Xo. 3 (holidays with pay), 380. 

Xo. 4 (overtime), 698; (firemen and 
policemen), 699; (temporary workers), 
699; (amendments to general order), 
698; (stationary enginemen and fire- 
men), 699. 

No. 7 (shoe counter industry), 846. 

No. 10 (pasteurization, manufacture and 
distribution of dairy products), 846. 

Xo 13 (match industry), 609. 

Xo. 14 (real estate undertakings), 699. 

No. 15 (waste paper industry), 699. 

Xo. 16 (butter and cheese wholesale and 
export establishments), 700. 

Xo. 17 (laundry, dry cleaning, dyeing. 
carpet cleaning and allied service estab- 
lishments in Mont-real district), 700. 

Xo. 19 (hosiery workers), 200. 

Xo. 22 (bricks and building blocks manu- 
facturing), 1026. 

Xo. 23 (taverns, Montreal and district), 
381 

Xo. 25 (waste materials industry), 700. 

No. 28 (dye works and laundries in Quebec 
and Quebec West), 846. 

No. 30 (manufacture of wooden boxes and 
other wooden objects), 700. 

No. 31 (tailors and dressmakers in Quebec 
City), 846. 

No. 32 (matttress and upholstering industry 
in Quebec, Levis and Quebec West ) . 
846. 



INDEX 



xlv 



Minimum Wages — Con. 

Minimum Wage Commission — Con. 
No. 33 (wholesale foodstuffs in Quebec dis- 
trict), 846. 
No. 34 (ice industry and ice trading in 

Quebec City and district), 10:26. 
No. 36 (foundries, Hull), 706. 
No. 43 (war industries), 700 

Sask. administration of Act in 1946, 769'; new 
orders under Act re hours of work and 
overtime, 1027; amendments in Act re 
pay for public holidays, 1492, 1493; 
revised orders under Act governing pub- 
lic holidays; hotels, restaurants and 
hospitals; long distance truckers; jan- 
itors and caretakers; summer resorts, 
1026; amendment in Workmen's Wage 
Act, 1493; Court holds foreman not 
employer as defined by Minimum Wage 
Act, 555; post-office workers hired by 
postmaster are subject to Minimum 
Wage Act, 847. 

United Kingdom: provisions of Wages Reg- 
ulation Order governing minimum rates 
for restaurant workers, 1346; increased 
minimum wages for farm workers in 
England and Wales, 1892. 

Switzerland: ratification of I.L.O. convention 
governing minimum wage fixing mach- 
inery, 1123. 

U.S.A.: violation of Fair Labour Standards 
Act and Public Contract's Act in 1946, 
778; Supreme Court removes trainees 
from minimum wage regulations, 284; 
inclusion of male workers under mini- 
mum wage law in Massachusetts, 62; 
appointment of wage boards to recom- 
mend revision of minimum rates for 
women and minors in hotel, restaurant 
and laundry industries, in New York 
state, 11; recommendations of National 
Conference on Labour Legislation, 266; 
support of adequate minimum wage for 
farm workers pledged by A.F. of L., 
1774. 

Mining: 

second meeting of I.L.O. Industrial Com- 
mittee on Coal Mining, in Geneva, 
Switzerland, 1116; Canadian participa- 
tion, 788'. 
Canada — 

increase in wage rate index in 1946, 771. 
man-power situation in 1946, 654. 
The Department of Labour and the Mining 
Industry — extracts from address by 
Deputy Minister of Labour at conven- 
tion of Canadian Institute of Mining 
and Metallurgy, 119. 
summary of report of Royal Commission on 

Coal, 302-10. 
recommendation of C.C of L., 1585. 
B.C.: application of 44-hour week to metal 

mines upheld by Court of Appeal, 702. 
N.S.: coal miners granted wage increase, 
1753; amendments in Coal Mines Reg- 
ulation Act, 1331. 
Que : mine rescue stations provided by new 
regulation under Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act, 1683. 
Australia: policy of Joint Coal Board estab- 
lished to administer measures to 
remedy conditions in coal industry in 
New South Wales, 1416. 



Mining — Con. 

United Kingdom: five-day week in coal mines, 
632; coal production under five-day 
week, 918; conciliation machinery in 
coal mining industry, 513; improved 
lighting in coal mines — recommendation 
of Technical Advisory Committee, 1444; 
importance of coal production em- 
phasized in White Paper on Economic 
Survey for 19^7, 506, 508; production 
program for 1947, 509. 

U.S.A.: provisions of new collective agree- 
ments in coal mines, 1099; collective 
bargaining in coal mining industry, 
657; soft coal miners comply with 
Supreme Court mandate, 492; federal 
mine safety code incorporated in new 
agreement in coal mines, 1166; research 
on miners' diseases ( silicosis, etc.), 
planned by U.M.W , 921. 

Mitchell, Hon. Humphrey, Minister of 

Labour: 

statement on amendments to Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations, 132-34. 

tables Industrial Relations Bill (No. 338) 
in House of Commons, 923. 

statement on Industrial Relations and Dis- 
putes Investigation Act, 92,7. 

statement on labour relations regulations, 
484. 

tables conventions and recommendations 
adopted at 29th session of International 
Labour Confer ence, in House of Com- 
mons, 316. 

statement on ratification by Canada of 
Instrument for the Amendment of the 
Constitution of the International 
Labour Organization and the Final 
Articles Revision Convention, 1946, 
1122 

on high level of employment in Canada, 911. 

on agreement between Canadian Seamen's 
Union and various shipping companies, 
1247. 

on employment opportunities in Canada for 
Canadians, 771. 

on settlement of dispute over vacations with 
pay for railway employees, 1562. 

on Act respecting the Hudson Bay Mining 
and Smelting Company, 1326. 

announces further immigration of Polish 
veterans to work on farms, 628. 

on admission of labour to Canada for 
employment in textile and sugar beet 
industries, 629. 

on placement of domestic workers from dis- 
placed persons' camps, 1562. 

announces Polish veterans permitted to pur- 
chase or rent own farms, 1757. 

advocates exchange of building tradesmen, 
629'. 

on exchange of harvesting units between 
Canada and the United States, 775'. 

statement on transfer of unemployed per- 
sons from Nova Scotia, 277, 625. 

on results of survey of handicapped workers, 
123. 

on extension of coverage of unemployment 
insurance, 1813. 

announces discontinuance of Government 
aid for repatriation to Japan, 1411. 

closing of Japanese placement hostel at 
Moose Jaw, 1246. 

accepts minutes of early labour meetings for 
Department of Labour library, 1247 



xlvi 



INDEX 



Mitchell, Hon. Humphrey — Con. 

extracts from New Year's message, 1. 

Labour Day message, 1241. 

announces appointments to U.I.C. Advisory 
Committee, 916. 

announces retirement of Dr. Allon Peebles, 
Director of Research and Statistics, 
Department of Labour, 1411. 

statement on use of C V.T. plan by veter- 
ans, 175*6. 

extracts from address at conference of 
Vocational Training Advisory Council, 
854, 1670. 

extracts from address at Joint National 
Conference of the Construction 
Industry, 298. 

remarks at fiftieth anniversary celebration 
of Ottawa Allied Trades and Labour 
Association, 1248. 

reply to presentation of Dominion legisla- 
tive program of C.C.C L., 502. 

remarks at presentation of Dominion legis- 
lative program of C.C. of L., 501; at 
convention of, 1577. 

reply to Dominion legislative proposals of 
T. and L.C., 497; extracts from address 
at convention of, 1569. 

Montreal University: 

functions and purposes of Industrial Rela- 
tions Sections, Faculty of Social 
Sciences, 686 

Morale : 

See Human Motivation in Industry. 

Mosher, A. R., President, Canadian Congress 
of Labour: 

extracts from letter assailing dual loyalty 
of Communist unions, 1098. 

summary of submission to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
1105. 

extracts from New Year's message, 2; from 
Labour Day message, 1242; from con- 
vention address, 1576. 

reply to Right Hon. C. D. Howe, Minister of 
Reconstruction and Supply, at presenta- 
tion of Dominion legislative program of 
C.C. of L., 501. 

Mothers' Allowances: 

Canada — 

increased allowances urged by C.C. of L., 
1582. 

Alta: regulations under Bureau of Public 
Welfare Act governing recipients of 
mothers' allowances and their depen- 
dents, 1497; hospital services for 
mothers receiving pensions, provided 
under Act, 839. 

Man.: repeal of certain regulations under 
Child Welfare Act, 845. 

Ont.: new regulations under Mothers' Allow- 
ances Act, 1498. 

Que.: amendments in Needy Mothers' Assis- 
tance Act, 1489. 
See also Children's Allowances; Family 
Allowances. 

Motion Pictures: 

Alta. — 

amendment in Amusements Act re licensing 
of motion picture machine operators, 
839. 



Motivation in Industry: 

See Human Motivation in Industry. 

Motor Transportation: 

See Motor Vehicles; Transportation. 

Motor Vehicles: 

Canada — 

wage rates, hours and working conditions 
in motor vehicles industry, 1169; in 
the motor vehicle parts and accessories 
industry, 1532. 

D.B. of S. report on sales and financing of 
motor vehicles, 1393. 

amendment to provincial law (Quebec) gov- 
erning accident prevention, requested 
by C.C.C.L, 1588. 
Alta.: new regulations under Apprenticeship 
Act governing motor vehicle repair 
trade, 196-97. 
Man.: amendments in Highway Traffic Act re 
minimum age of farm truck and speed 
tractor drivers, and chauffeurs, 1023 
Sask.: regulations under Factories Act gov- 
erning safety in motor vehicle repair 
shops, 1499. 

See also Transportation. 

Municipalities : 

Man. — 

amendment in Municipal Act re pensions 

for municipal officials, 1023; re "relief 

benefits, 1023, 
Que.: revised section of Cities and Towns 

Act re provision of retirement pension 

for municipal officers and employees, 

1489. 
Sask.: provisions of Social Aid Act (1947). 

1495. 

Murchison, C. A. L„ re- 
appointment as unemployment insurance 
commissioner, 6, 916. 

Murdock, Hon. Senator James, P.C.: 

chairman at initial meeting of Standing 
Committee on Immigration and Labour, 
Labour, 779 

Murray, Philip, President, Congress of 
Industiial Organizations: 
address at convention of C.I.O., 1775. 

Musical Instruction: 

U.S. A — 

musical instruction as an aid in rehabilita- 
tion of veterans, 1250. 

Muttart, Limited, M.D.: 

agreement makes employees liable for illegal 
strikes, 911. 

Mutual Aid Board (Canada): 

summary of final report, 490. 

National Bureau of Standards: 

Canada — 

establishment recommended by C.C. of L., 
500. 

National Emergency Transitional Powers 
Act (1945); 

extension, 696. 

replaced by Continuation of Transitional 
Measures Act (1947), 1327. 



INDEX 



xlvii 



National Employment Committee (U.I.C.) : 

meeting, 221. 

appointment of Judge W. J. Linda], chair- 
man, 916. 
studies placement of older workers, 1484. 
meeting with Maritime Committee, 708. 

National Employment Service : 

See Employment Service. 

National Expenditure: 

See Expenditure. 

National Film Board: 

distribution of labour films, 1247. 

A Man with a Plan — filmstrip depicting 
benefits of labour-management produc- 
tion committees, 1003. 

Take it up with the L.M.P.C. — film released 
.by Department of Labour, 1759. 

legislative recommendation of T. and L.C, 
497. 

National Harbours Board: 

legislative recommendation of T. and L.C, 

497. 

National Health and Welfare, Department 
of: 

activities of Industrial Health Branch de- 
scribed in annual report, 488. 

report on administration of old age and 
blind pensions, 775. 

health and working conditions of federal 
government employees investigated by 
•Civil Service Health Division, 489. 

establishment of Inter-departmental Com- 
mittee to study health insurance for 
federal government employees, 489. 

issues booklet on Noise and Vibration Con- 
trol, 789. 

activities re industrial hygiene commended 
by CJC. of L., 499. 

National Housing Act: 

eee Housing. 



National Income: 

See Income. 

National Institute of Houseworkers (United 
Kingdom) : 

functions, 776. 

National Joint Committees: 

establishment recommended by Building, 
Civil Engineering and Public Works 
Committee of I.L.O., 145. 

National Labour Code: 

See Labour Code. 

National Labour Relations Act (U.S.A.) : 

amended by Labour-Management Relations 
Act, 946. 



National Labour Relations Board (U.S.A.): 

eleventh annual report, 635. 

changes in policy re interpretation of 
Wagner Act, 490. 

strike to enforce violation of Wagner Act 
ruled illegal by Board, 284. 

dismisses unfair labour charge brought by 
United Steelworkers (C.IjO.), 491. 

upholds employer's right to report on nego- 
tiations, 491. 

state Labour Relations Board may not act 
in Nation a] Board's field even if 
National Board declines to act, 850. 

National Selective Service Civilian Regul- 
ations : 

discontinuance of labour exit permits, 277. 

National War Labour Board (Canada) : 

decisions of Board re wage increases and 
relation to income tax deductions, 6. 
Decisions of Board: 

Acadia Coal Company, Limited, Stellarton, 
166. 

Acadia Gas Engines Limited, Bridgewater, 
164. 

Building Products Limited, and La Federa- 
tion Nationale des Travailleurs de la 
Pulpe et du Papier Inc. (Pont Rouge), 
28. 

Canada Steamship Lines Limited, 165. 

Canada Veneers Limited, and Industrial 
Union of Veneer Workers, Local No. 1. 
30. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and cer- 
tain employees, 167. 

Cape Breton Bus and Tram Company, 
Limited, and Brotherhood of Railroad 
Trainmen, Lodge 684, Cape Breton, 25. 

Charlebois Hat Incorporated and National 
Syndicate of the Hat Industry, Mont- 
real, 29. 

Dow Chemical Company of Canada, Limited, 
and United Mineworkers of America, 
District 50, Sarnia, 26. 

Falconbridge Nickel Mines Limited, and 
Sudbury Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers' Union, Local 598, 24. 

Eudore Fournier et Fils, 323. 

Halifax Shipyards Limited, et al, 322. 

Imperial Oil Limited, Producing Depart- 
ment (Western Operations), Royalite 
Oil Company, Limited, Madison 
Natural Gas Company, Limited, Valley 
Pipe Line Company, Limited, 27. 

Midland Railway Company of Manitoba and 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Fire and 
Enginemen, Brotherhood of Railroad 
Trainmen and Order of Railway Con- 
ductors, 23. 

Northern Foundry and Machine Company, 
Limited, and United Steelworkers of 
America, Local 3707, Sault Ste. Marie, 
24. 

Pacific Coyle Navigation Company, Limited, 
Marpole Towing Company, Limited, 
Vancouver Barge Transportation 
L i m i t e,d , Victoria Tug Company 
Limited, M. R. Cliff and B.C. Mills 
Towing Company, Limited, Young and 
Gore Tugboat Company, Limited, and 
Canadian Seamen's Union, 27. 



xlviii 



INDEX 



National War Labour Board — Con. 
Decisions of Board — Con. 

Railway Express Agency Incorporated, 164. 
Western Canada Motor Car Company, 
Limited, Carter Motor Car Company, 
Limited, and International Association 
of Machinists, Winnipeg, 2il. 

National War Labour Board (U.S.A.) : 

dissolution, and review of wartime func- 
tions, 285. 

Nationalization : 

Canada — 

establishment of government-owned and con- 
trolled banking system urged by C.C. 
of L., 1585. 

Natural Resources: 

Canada — 
national reserve of public projects as factor 
in stabilizing employment — text of 
paper on Timing of Public Investment 
in Construction, 128, 131. 

Navigation : 

resolution of I.)L.O. Industrial Committee 
on Inland Transport re Rhine Navi- 
gation, 1122. 

Neilson, Richmond H., Department of 
Labour: 
death of, 14113. 

Netherlands : 

trade union membership as at January 1, 

1947, 1759. 
study on collective agreements, 1124. 

Neurosis : 

See Diseases, Industrial. 

New Zealand: 

secret ballot before striking required of 
trade unionists in amendment to Indus- 
trial Conciliation and Arbitration Act, 
1759. 

results of study on eyestrain in industry, 
127. 

"Newburyport Plan" (U.S.A.) : 

scheme for reducing prices, 9i22. 

Newfoundland Federation of Labour: 

extracts from address of R. J. Fahey, fra- 
ternal delegate to convention of T. and 
L.C., 1571. 

"No-Strike" Clause: 

Canada — 

text of award of Hon. Mr. Justice C. P. 
McTague in meat packing dispute, 1794. 

Noise : 

Canada — 

summary of booklet on Noise and Vibration 
Control, 789. 

Non-Production Bonus : 

U.S.A.— 

extent of non-production bonuses in 1945- 
46, 1781. 



Norway : 

study on collective agreements, 1124. 

Nurses : 

United Kingdom — 

report on recruitment and training of 
nurses, 1423. 

Nursing : 

Alta — 

regulations under Nursing Orders Act 
(1947), 1334. 

Occupational Classifications : 

Canada — 

industrial classifications (war industries) 
listed under Schedule A (now repealed) 
of Wartime Labour Relations [Regula- 
tions, 132. 

jobs specially suitable for older workers, 
1257. 

job evaluation plan of Canadian Ingersoll- 
Rand Company, Limited, 1097. 

training-on-the-job opportunities for veter- 
ans as discovered by N.E.S., 120. 
U.S.A.: revision of job classifications in steel 
and meat-packing industries, 283. 

Occupational Hazards: 

Canada — 

hazards of coal mining described in report 

of Royal Commission on Coal. 304. 
United Kingdom: draft health and welfare 

regulations for pottery industry, 1752. 
U.S.A.: minimum age for employment in 

specified hazardous occupations in state 

of Maine, 1737. 

Occupational Information Service: 

Canada — 

functions described at conference of Voca- 
tional Training Advisory Council, 1672. 

Old Age Pensions: 

See Pensions. 

Older Workers: 

Canada — 

report (with charts) on the problem of 
the older worker, 1251-58. 

employment of older workers discussed by 
Deputy Minister of Labour, 4, 1257. 

placement of older workers studied by 
National Employment Committee, 1484. 

Canadian Corps of Commissionaires as- 
sists in rehabilitation of older workers, 
630. 

proportion of older men in mining labour 
force described in report of Royal Com- 
mission on Coal, 308. 
United Kingdom: industrial accidents to 
old persons, outlined in annual report 
of Inspector of Factories (1945), 152. 

One Day's Rest in Seven: 

Canada — 

provision of collective agreements in fishing 

industry, 1433. 
See also Sunday Labour. 

Ontario Rehabilitation Committee: 

issues Digest of reports of rehabilitation 
conferences. 776. 



INDEX 



xlix 



"Open-End" Wage: 

definition, 1411. 
Canada — 

"open-end wage clause" in agreement in 
rubber industry, 1411. 

Open Shop : 

U.S.A.— 

unemployment benefits denied when open 
shop employment refused, 125. 

Orders in Council: 

P.C. 204 (application for special bonus for 
merchant seamen), 196. 

P.C. 302 (amendment to Wartime (Labour 
Relations Regulations), 132. 

P.C. 401 (termination of appointment of 
steel controller), 124. 

P.C. 467 (extended coverage under Vet- 
erans' Insurance Act), 387. 

P.C 600 (Advisory Committee on veter- 
ans' dependents overseas), 559. 

P.C. 647 (application in Canada of con- 
ventions and recommendations of 
I.L.O.), 316. 

P.C. 657 (discontinuance of labour exit 
permits). 277. 

P.C. 1003 (Wartime Labour Relations 
Regulations continued in force). 696. 

P.C. 1003 (amendments), 132. 

P.C. 1112 (extension of National Emer- 
gency Transitional Powers Act, 1945), 
696. 

P.C. 1118 (N.E.S. regulations, 1947), 569. 

P.C. 1166 (revocation of certain orders and 
regulations under National Emergency 
Transitional Powers Act), 696. 

P.C. 1233 (revocation of Section 3, of P.C. 
2911 re administration of W.L.R.R.), 
843. 

P.C. 1329 (suspension of order prohibiting 
entry of contract labour), 628. 

P.C. 1746 (entry of Poles into Canada). 
775. 

P.C. 1820 (revocation of P.C. 2911 re 
administration of W.L.R.R. in Ontario), 
843. 

P.C. 402'0 (incorporation of provisions gov- 
erning appointment of industrial dis- 
putes inquiry commissions in P.C. 1003), 
132. 

P.C. 5270 (new regulations under Explosives 
Act). 196. 

P.C. 48/1880 (travelling expenses of trans- 
ferred workers), 774. 

Organization in Industry, Commerce and 
the Professions: 

thirteenth report, 1413. 

Ottawa Allied Trades and Labour Associa- 
ation: 

fiftieth anniversary, 1248. 

Out-of-Work Benefits: 

Canada — 

out-of-work benefits paid under Post-Dis- 
charge Re-establishment Order, 213, 
558. 

report (with table) on number of veterans 
receiving benefits under Post-Discharge 
Re-establishment Order during period 
October, 1945, to October, 1946, 63, 64. 

number of veterans receiving benefits and 
payments made under Veterans' Re- 
habilitation Act during 1946, 915. 



Output : 

See Productivity. 

Overtime : 

Canada — 
overtime rates of pap for plant employees 

in certain industries: 

agricultural implements, 1536, 1537. 

brewery products, 995, 997. 

edible plant products — flour milling, 
1854, 1856; bread and cake baking, 
1857, 1858; biscuit manufacturing, 
1860, 1861 ; confectionery manu- 
facturing, 1862, 1864. 

electrical machinery and apparatus, 
1725. 

fishing, 1434, 1442. 

meat products, 1851, 1852. 

motor vehicle parts and accessories, 
1534. 

motor vehicles, 1169. 

pulp and paper, 989, 993. 

radio sets and parts, 1728, 1729. 

rubber products, 1165, 1168. 

sawmill products, 1377 — planing mill, 
sash and door, 1381; wooden furni- 
ture, 1383, 1386. 
resolution adopted at convention of T. and 

L.C., 1574. 
Alta.: provisions of Labour Act, 836, 844. 
B.C.: regulations under Hours of Work Act, 

60; order under Minimum Wage Act 

and Hours of Work Act governing over- 
time in shops for Christmas season, 

1816. 
Man.: new regulations under Minimum Wage 

Act governing male and female workers, 

553. 
Que.: permits issued during 1045, 1688. 
United Kingdom: increase in rates paid to 

merchant seamen under agreements 

negotiated by National Maritime Board, 

633-34; increased overtime rates for 

farm workers in England and Wales, 

1892. 

Packinghouse Workers: 

Canada — 

arbitration award of Hon. Mr. Justice C. 
P. McTague in meat packing dispute, 
1753, 1791-96. 
resolution of CO. of L. re packinghouse 
workers' strike, 1582. 

U.S.A.: guaranteed annual wage plan estab- 
lished in packing company, 125; review 
of wage structures and job classifica- 
tions, 283. 

Paper: 

See Pulp and Paper Industry. 

Payrolls : 

See Salaries; Wages. 

Peebles, Dr. Allon, Director of Research and 
Statistics, Department of Labour: 

statement at meeting of Standing Com- 
mittee on Immigration and OLabour, 780. 

retirement, 1411. 



INDEX 



Pensions : 

report on miners' invalidity and old age 
pensions schemes requested by I.L.O. 
Industrial Committee on Coal Mining, 
1120. 
Canada — 

group pension plans issued by Annuities 

Branch, Department of Labour, 488. 
pension plans 'for older workers, 1254. 
rehabilitation work of Citizens' Committees, 

. 386. 
pension schemes for coal miners outlined 
in report of Royal Commission on Coal, 
306. 
revised pension plan of Bristol-Myers Com- 
pany of Canada, Limited, 1094 . 
retirement pension plan of Dominion 

Stores, Limited, 570. 
pension plan of George Weston, Limited, 

1501. 
pensions for invalids requested by C.C.C.L., 
1588. 
Alta.: hospital services for old age and blind 
pensioners and mothers receiving allow- 
ances, provided under Bureau of Public 
Welfare Act, 839; application of Public 
Service Pension Act to employees of 
Workmen's Compensation Board, 1024; 
regulations under Bureau of Public 
Welfare Act governing old age and 
blind pensioners, 1497; recommendations 
of Federation of Labour, 259. 
B.C.: legislative resolution re Dominion Old 

Age Pensions Act, defeated, 1020 
Man.: new and amended provisions of Old 
Age and Blind Persons' Pensions Act, 
1022; amendment in Brandon Charter, 
1023; amendment in Municipal Act re 
pensions for municipal officials, 1023; 
legislative resolutions re old age and 
blind persons' pensions defeated, 1023. 
N.S.: amendment in Old Age Pensions Act, 

1332. 
Ont.: amended regulations under Old Age 
Pensions Act, 1498; regulations under 
Workmen's 'Compensation Act provid- 
ing for establishment of superannuation 
plan, 1025. 
Que.: general report of Old Age and Blind 
Pensions Commission, 117; revised sec- 
tion of Cities and Towns Act re provi- 
sion of retirement pension for munici- 
pal officers and employees, 1489. 
Sask.: award of Saskatoon municipal pension 
not reviewable by Court, 848; amend- 
ment in Railway Act recommended in 
legislative resolution, 1496. 
U.S.A.: pension plan established at Ford 
Motor Company, 920; rejected, 1758; 
officers' pension fund established by 
garment workers' union, 11; royalty on 
tonnage for health and retirement fund 
raised under new agreement in coal 
mines, 1100; collective bargaining on 
pensions and compulsory retirement, 
recommended by N.L.R B., 284; amend- 
ment to Social Security Act requested 
by A.F. of L., 1774; extension of cover- 
age of old age and survivors' insurance 
recommended by Social Security Board, 
in annual report, 283. 
Dominion Old Age Pensions Act — 



Pensions — Con. 
Canada — 

new regulations, 1497. 

amended provisions, 1327. 

report on administration of old age and 
blind pensions by Department of 
National Health and Welfare, 775. 

amendment to Act re amounts payable and 
eligibility requirements, 914. 

Dominion-provincial agreements, 1408, 1682. 

financial and statistical summary concern- 
ing old age and blind pensioners as at 
December 31, 1946, 271; as at March 
31, 1947, 763; as at June 30, 1947, 1404; 
■as at September 30, 1947, 1890. 

legislative recommendations of C.C.C.L., 
502. 

recommendations of C.C. of L. 500, 1582. 
legislative recommendations of R.T.B., 955. 
improved legislation urged by T. and L.C., 
496. 

Perfect Union Shop: 

definition, 135. 
Que.— 

number of agreements of C.C.C.L., T. and 
L.S., C.C. of L. iand other unions, 
containing perfect union shop provi- 
sions, 135. 

Permits : 

See Child Labour; Juvenile Employment; 
Labour Exit Permits; Overtime; 
Shifts. 

Personnel Management: 

Canada — 

health program for employees of Bell Tele- 
phone Company of Canada, 1815. 

United Kingdom: development of principle 
of personnel management noted in 
annual report of Inspector of Factories 
(1945), 150. 

U.S. A.: summary of bulletin on Reconversion 
in Industrial Relations, 126. 

Petrillo, James, President, American Federa- 
tion of Musicians : 
Lea Act ("anti-Petrillo" law) ruled uncon- 
stitutional, 285. 

Petroleum : 

meeting of Petroleum Committee (I.L.O.) 
in Los Angeles, 138, 313. 
Man.: new regulations under Fires Prevention 
Act and Factories Act re petroleum 
products, 200. 

Phelan, Edward J., Director General, Inter- 
national Labour Office: 
on official relationship of I.L.O. with 
United Nations, 12. 

Physicians : 

Que.— 

provisions of Act to encourage establish- 
ment of physicians in country district?. 
1489. 



INDEX 



Picard, Gerard, President, Canadian and 
Catholic Confederation of Labour: 

summary of submission to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
1105. 

presents Dominion legislative program, 501. 

extracts from New Year's message, 2; from 
Labour Day message, 1214; from con- 
vention address, 1580. 

Picketing : 

Canada — 

legislative recommendations of C.C. of L., 
500. 

prohibition of mass picketing recommended 
by C.M.A., 1114. 
U.S.A.: enactment of legislation to curb juris- 
dictional disputes, 1114; prohibition of 
mass picketing urged by National 
Association of Manufacturers, 10; 
picketing and sabotage, in Texas, pro- 
hibited under legislation governing pub- 
lic utilities, 1414 

Pigott, J. M., Canadian Construction Asso- 
ciation: 
report on apprentice requirements of con- 
struction industry, 631. 

Pilotage By-laws: 

See Canada Shipping Act. 

Placements : 

Canada — 

placement of domestic workers from dis- 
placed persons' camps, 1562. 

number of placements under Dominion- 
Provincial Farm Labour Program in 
1946, 5. 

functions of Community Youth Placement 
Centres established by N.E.S., 642. 

placement of ex-service women in western 
provinces, 385. 

placement of older workers studied by 
National Employment Committee, 1484. 

closing of Japanese placement hostel at 
Moose Jaw, 1246. 
U.S. A.: placement of handicapped workers, 
126, 

Police : 

Ont.— 

provisions of Act governing collective bar- 
gaining and arbitration, 841; new sec- 
tion under Act forbidding municipal 
police to join trade union, etc., 841 

Polish Veterans: 

Canada — 

immigration to Canada to work on farms, 

628. 
permission to purchase or rent own farms, 

1757. 
increased number permitted entry to 

Canada, 775. 
activities of Canadian Mission appointed to 

select Polish veterans, 1750. 

Polish Workers: 

Canada — 
admission of labour from Europe for employ- 
ment in mills of Dionne Spinning Mill 
Company, 629, 1412. 



Political Action: 

Canada — 
resolution of C.C. of L., 1580. 
resolution on political affiliations of mem- 
bers, adopted at convention of T. and 
L.C., 1574. 
U.S.A.: establishment of "Educational and 
Political League" by A.F. of L., 1774. 

Poll Tax: 

Alta.— 

provisions of Town and Village Act re 
municipal and school taxes, 839. 

Population: 

Canada- 
increase in population indicated in D.B. 
of S. annual estimate, 835. 

Portal-to-Portal Pay: 

U.S.A.— 

Portal-to-Portal Pay Act signed by Presi- 
dent Truman, 777. 

shipbuilding company required to pay for 
"portal" time, 921. 

claims for collection of retroactive portal- 
to-portal pay, 8. 

time spent in preparing for work too trifling 
to warrant damages under Fair Labour 
Standards Act, 556. 

Post-Discharge Re-establishment Order: 

report (with table) on number of veterans 
receiving benefits during period Oct- 
ober, 1945 to October, 1946, 63, 64. 

awards granted under Order, 213-14, 558-59. 

Postage : 

Canada — 

provision of postal-free delivery of regula- 
tion food parcels to United Kingdom 
during emergency requested by C.C. 
of L., 1585. 

Potatoes : 

movement of potato harvesters between 
Canada and the United States, 1762. 

Pottery Industry: 

United Kingdom — 

draft health and welfare regulations for the 
pottery industry issued under author- 
ity of Factories Act, 1752. 
recommendations of Pottery Working 
Party, 155. 

Power: 

United Kingdom — 

situation in 1947 outlined in White Paper 
on Economic Survey for 1947, 509. 

Pre-Matriculation : 

See Matriculation. 

Preferential Shop: 

definition, 135. 
Canada — 

agreements in fishing industry containing 
preference in hiring clause, 1428, 1429. 
Que.: number of agreements of C.C.C.L., T. 
and L.C., C.C. of L. and other unions, 
containing provisions for preferential 
shop, 135. 



lli 



INDEX 



Pressmen's Label: 

See Legal Decisions. 

Price Control: 

Canada — 

extensive measure of decontrol announced 
by Rt. Hon. L. S. St. Laurent, Acting 
Minister of Finance. 1545. 

statement of Hon. D. C. Abbott, Minister 
of Finance, on removal of price control 
from additional goods and services, 486. 

extracts from radio address of Hon. Colin 
Gibson, Secretary of State, on price 
and related controls, 1546. 

Combines Investigation Commission and 
price decontrol, 1408. 

reason for existence of continued price con- 
trol, described in annual report of 
W.P.T.B. (1946), 598. 

legislative recommendations of C.C.C.L., 
501; other recommendations, 1587. 

legislative recommendation of C.C. of L., 
499; remarks of Pat Conroy, 501; of 
A. R. Mosher, 501; of Hon. Humphrey 
Mitchell, 501; resolution adopted, 1580- 
81. 

continuance of wartime price controls 
urged by T. and L.C., 495; resolution 
adopted at convention, 1573'. 
Belgium: resolutions taken at meeting of 

National Conference of Labour, 1605. 
U.S.A.: authority to reimpose controls in 
fight against inflation sought by Presi- 
dent Truman, 1757; dissolution of 
N.W.L.B., and review of wartime 
activities re price control, 285. 

Price Decontrol : 

Canada — 

government policy described in annual 

report (1946) of W.P.T.B., 601-2. 
Combines Investigation Commission and 

price decontrol, 1408. 

Prices : 

comparison of prices in Canada and United 

States, 102. 
Canada — 

the cost-of-living index and its meaning. 

952, 
Combines Investigation Commission and 

price decontrol, 1408. 
monthly statement of retail and wholesale 

prices of staple foods, coal and rentals, 

102, 260, 461, 604, 753, 899, 1072, 1229, 

1394, 1546, 1738, 1876. 
annual report (1946) of W.P.T.B., 598. 
recommendations of C.C.C.L., 1587. 
recommendation of C.C. and L. re farm 

prices, 1585. 
enactment of "Fisheries Prices Support 

Act" recommended by T. and L.C., 

1575. 
Alta.: recommendation of Federation of 

Labour, 259. 
United Kingdom: establishment of new cost- 

of living index, 917; recommendations 

of T.U.C., 1589. 



Prices — Con. 

U.S.A.: comparison of prices in Canada and 
the United States, 102; increase in cost 
of living from 1945 to 1947, 635-36; 
recommendations of economic report 
delivered by President Truman to Con- 
gress, 512; government prosecutes firms 
for price conspiracies, 1248; "Newbury- 
port Plan" for reducing cost of living 
922; report on collective agreements 
providing adjustments' of wages to cost 
of living, 792. 

Prisoners of War: 

Canada — 

statement of Deputy Minister of Labour on 
return of war prisoners to Europe, 4. 
Private Enterprise: 

Australia — 

maintenance of free and private enterprise 
urged at tripartite industrial confer- 
ence, 1416. 

Privileges and Immunities Act: 

provisions, 1328. 
Production Bonus : 

See Incentive Wage Plans. 
Productivity : 

production and employment in iron and 
steel industry, 1767, and in metal 
trades, 1770' — reports of International 
Labour Office presented at second ses- 
sion of I.L.O. Industrial Committee. 

recommendations of Building, Civil Engin- 
eering and Public Works Committee of 
I.L.O., at meeting in Brussels, 143. 

need for increased production stressed by 
Textiles Committee of I.L.O. at meet- 
ing held in Brussels, 140. 
Canada — 

productivity as a problem of the older 
worker, 1254. 

study (with charts and tables) on seasonal 
variations of employment in the auto- 
mobile and parts industry, 287-92. 

report on production outlook for basic and 
building materials, 505. 

report on manufacturing industries of 
Canada in 1945, 1258. 

productivity in the coal industry discussed 
in report of Royal Commission on Coal, 
307. 

labour productivity and its relation to wages 
and inflation — report of C.M.A., 1114. 
Australia: conclusions of tripartite industrial 
conference held to fashion industrial 
program to increase production, 1415. 
L T nited Kingdom: production program for 
1947 outlined in White Paper on Eco- 
nomic Survey for 19! f 7, 509, 510; coal 
production under five-day week, 918; 
recommendations of T.U.C., 1589. 
U.S.A.: recommendations of economic report 
delivered by President Truman to Con- 
gress, 512; high level of production, 
921; report on industrial productivity 
during war and post-war periods, 318; 
effects of long working hours on output, 
1445; success of management-labour 
time study and production method*. 
1415; extent of non-production bonuses 
in 1945-46-, 1781; effect of consumers* 
co-operatives on full production, 1099: 
co-operative production in 1945. 397: 
high wages based on high productivitv 
sought by National Association of 
Manufacturers, 10. 



INDEX 



liii 



Professional Syndicates Act (Quebec) : 

amendments, 1488. 

annual report of Department of Labour 
(1945), 1684. 

Professional Workers : 

Canada — 

survey of professional openings — future 
employment opportunities for univer- 
sity-trained personnel, 1093. 

employment trends in the professions — - 
report (with charts) of Bureau of 
Technical Personnel, 1419. 

geographical distribution of professional 
openings in Canada, 1564. 

report of W.B.T.P. on scientific and pro- 
fessional employment in 1946-47, 710. 
U.S.A.: unionization of professional engineers 
and chemists, 10. 

Professions : 

Canada — 

thirteenth report on organization in 
industry, commerce and the professions, 
1413. 

Profit-Sharing : 

United Kingdom — 

report on failure of profit-sharing and 
co-partnership in United Kingdom, 790. 
U.S.A.: trend toward profit-sharing plans. 
1757. 

Profits : 

United Kingdom — 

recommendations of T.U.C., 1589. 

Public Assistance: 

Sask.— 

provisions of Social Aid Act (1945), 1495- 



Public Contracts Act (U.S.A.) : 

provisions, 1758. 

enforcement of wage and hour and child 
labour laws in 1946, 778. 

Public Health: 

See Health. 

Public Investment: 

Canada — • 

national reserve of public projects as factor 
in stabilizing employment — text of 
paper on Timing of Public Investment 
in Construction, 128. 

Public Schools: 

See Schools. 

Public Service : 

Canada — 

provisions of Government Employees' Com- 
pensation Act, 1326. 

Alta.: application of Public Service Pension 
Act to employees of Workmen's Com- 
pensation Board, 1024. 

Que.: 'administration of Public Services 
Employees' Disputes Act, 1686. 

Sask.: regulations under Public Service Act 
(1947), 1492. 

United Kingdom: statistics re distribution of 
man-power, 508; program for 1947, 510. 

U.S.A.: California court rules that public 
servants should not belong to labour 
unions, 493; strikes by New York state 
employees, prohibited, 493. 



Public Utilities: 

Canada — ■ 

government ownership of radio broadcasting 
urged by C.C. of L., 1585. 

United Kingdom: statistics re distribution of 
man-power, 508; production program 
for 1947, 509. 

U.S.A.: enactment of legislation governing 
disputes in public utilities, 1414; com- 
pulsory arbitration in public utilities 
in Indiana and New Jersey, 638; legis- 
lation governing public utilities in New 
Jersey, 62; in New York state, 62. 

Public Welfare: 

Alta.— 

hospital services for old age and blind pen- 
sioners and mothers receiving allow- 
ances, provided under Bureau of Public 
Welfare Act, 839; regulations under 
Act governing old age and blind pen- 
sioners and recipients of mothers' 
allowances, and dependents, 1497. 

Public Works: 

first meeting of building, civil engineering 
and public works committee of I.L.O.. 
in Brussels, 142. 
Canada — 

national reserve of public projects as factor 
in stabilizing employment — text of 
article on Timing of Public Investment 
in Construction, 128. 

measures advocated by C.C. of L., 1583. 

Que.: annual report of Fair Wage Officer, 
1687. 

Publications : 

Canada — 

publications in Librarv of Federal Depart- 
ment of Labour, 113, 615, 1083, 1557. 
summary of 1947 publications on provincial 
labour standards, 1265. 

Publicity: 

Canada — 
rehabilitation work of Citizens' Committees, 

386. 
report of C.C. of L. convention Committee 
on Education and Publicity, 1585. 

Pulp and Paper Industry: 

Canada — 

wages, hours .and working conditions in pulp 
and paper industry (1946), 988. 

Racial Discrimination : 

See Discrimination. 

Radio: 

Canada — 
wage rates, hours and working conditions 
in radio sets and parts industry, 1727. 
government ownership of radio broadcast- 
ing urged by C.C. of L., 1585. 
resolution adopted at convention of T. and 
L.C., 1575. 
Alta.: trade of radio technician designated 
as trade under Apprenticeship Act, 696. 
U.S.A.: Court rules Lea Act ("anti-Petrillo" 
Law), unconstitutional 285. 

Railway Labour Disputes Act: 

review of legislation enacted in 1903, 639. 



Iiv 



INDEX 



Railway Transportation Brotherhoods: 

tabular report on union membership and 
local unions of international railway 
brotherhoods in Canada classified by 
affiliation, 1261. 

Dominion legislative program, 955. 

Railways : 

Canada — 

amendment in Canadian National-Canadian 
Pacific Act (1933), 1093. 

Bill to amend Railway Act, not passed, 
1328. 

settlement of dispute over vacations with 
pay for railway employees, 1501. 

wage rates in steam railway industry, 
890-92. 

resolutions adopted at T. and L.C. conven- 
tion, 1575. 
N.S.: amendment in Nova Scotia Railway 

Act re wages, 1332. _ 
Sask.: amendment in Railway Act recom- 
mended in legislative resolution, 1496. 
United Kingdom: situation in railway indus- 
try in 1947 outlined in White Paper on 
Economic Survey for 19k7, 509. 
U.S.A.: guaranteed employment plan of rail- 
way company, 1418; sickness benefits 
for railroad workers provided under 
government insurance program, 638; 
collective bargaining in railroad trans- 
portation, 657. 

See also Legal Decisions. 

Rand Formula: 

definition, 920. 
U.S.A.: provided in collective agreements cov- 
ering employees of Western Union Tele- 
graph Company, 920. 

Rationing: 

Alta.— 

rationing of all goods in short supply, 
recommended by Federation of Labour, 
259. 

U.S.A.: authority to revive consumer ration- 
ing sought by President Truman, 1757. 

Ratz, Dr. R. G., Department of National 
Health and Welfare: 

directs research into health and working 
conditions of Federal Government 
employees, 489. 

Re-employment : 

See Reinstatement in Civil Employment; 
Remploy Factories. 

Re-establishment : 

Canada — 
summary of report on Re-establishment of 

Japanese in Canada, 194^-^6, 785. 
See also Rehabilitation. 

Re-establishment Credits : 

Canada — 
assistance granted under federal rehabilita- 
tion program, 213-14, 558. 

Reconstruction : 

recommendations of Building, Civil Engin- 
eering and Public Works Committee of 
I.L.O., at meeting in Brussels, 143. 



Reconstruction and Supply, Department of: 

summary of evidence presented before 
Senate Standing Committee on Immi- 
gration and Labour, 1110. 

issues final report of Canadian Mutual Aid 
Board, 490. 

report on Forecast of 19^7 Investment by 
Canadian Business, 504. 

report' on production outlook for basic and 
building materials an Canada, 505. 

Reconversion : 

Canada — 
review of man-power situation in 1946 dur- 
ing reconversion period, 048. 

N.S.: problems of present period discussed at 
Industrial Relations Conference of the 
Maritime Bureau of Industrial Rela- 
tions, 20. 

U.S.A.: summary of bulletin on Reconversion 
in Industrial Relations, 126. 

Recruitment : 

resolutions adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Coal Mining concerning 
recruitment and related problems, 1117. 

recruitment and training of workers in con- 
struction industry, recommended by 
Building, Civil Engineering and Public 
Works Committee of I.L.O. at meeting 
in Brussels, 143. 

recruitment and training of textile workers, 
recommended by Textiles Committee of 
I.L.O. at meeting in Brussels, 141. 
United Kingdom: Britain and France con- 
clude agreement on recruitment of dis- 
placed persons, 1249; report on recruit- 
ment and training of nurses, 1423. 
France: Britain and France conclude agree- 
ment on recruitment of displaced per- 
sons, 1249. 

Reforestation : 

Canada — 

Dominion-provincial plan of reforestation 
urged by C.C. of L., 1583. 

Refugees: 

Caanda — 

summary of evidence presented before 
Senate Standing Comoaittee on Immi- 
gration and Labour, 1109. 
See also Displaced Persons. 

Registrations : 

See Unemployment Insurance. 

Rehabilitation: 

Canada — 

assistance of Canadian Corps of Commis- 
sionaires in rehabilitation of older vet- 
erans, 630. 

rehabilitation work of Citizens' Com- 
mittees, 386. 

Digest of reports of conferences issued by 
Ontario Rehabilitation Committee, 776. 

analysis of rehabilitation aids of N.E.S. — 
awards granted under Post-Discharge 
Re-establishment Order re out-of-work 
benefits, vocational training, awaiting 
returns, temporary incapacity, univer- 
sity education, benefits under Re-estab- 
lishment Credit, 213-14, 558-59. 

re-establishment of ex-service women in 
western provinces, 384. 



INDEX 



Rehabilitation — Con. 

report (with table) on use of rehabilitation 
aids, 63, 64. 

"temporary incapacity" awards granted vet- 
erans, 213, 558. 

"awaiting returns" awarded to veterans, 
213, 558. 

progress under Veterans' Rehabilitation 
Act, 915, 

use made by veterans of Canadian Voca- 
tional Training plan, 1756. 

activities under C.V.T., 560. 
B.C.: rehabilitation program reviewed in 
annual report of Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Board (1946), 1087. 
Ont.: Digest of reports of conferences issued 
by Ontario Rehabilitation Committee, 
776. 
U.S.A.: vocational rehabilitation for civilians, 
561; musical instruction as an aid in 
rehabilitation of veterans, 1250. 

Reinstatement in Civil Employment: 

Canada — 

Algoma Steel Corporation issues memo- 
randum on reinstatement of war veter- 
ans, 915. 

U.S.A.: changes in policy of N.L.R.B. re in- 
terpretation of Wagner Act, 490; 
Courts rule on veterans' re-employment 
rights, 493. 



Research — Con. 

recommendation of T. and L.C. re Ontario 
Cancer Treatment and Research Found- 
ation, 1575. 

N.S.: necessity of research facilities and 
trained staff in universities stressed at 
Conference of Maritime Bureau of 
Industrial Relations, 20. 

United Kingdom: report of Clapham Com- 
mittee on economic and social research, 
16, 

U.S.A.: research on miners' diseases (silicosis, 
etc.), planned by U.M.W., 921. 

Rest Periods: 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Inland Transport, 1122. 
Canada — 
rest periods provided under recent collec- 
tive agreements in manufacturing 
industry, 1756. 
U.S.A.: weekly rest day for all workers 
recommended at National Conference 
on Labour Legislation, 207. 

Restaurants : 

See Hotels and Restaurants. 

Retail Prices: 

See Prices. 



Relief: 

See Social Aid; Unemployment and Relief. 

Remploy Factories: 

United Kingdom — 

establishment of Remploy Factories for 
employment of disabled persons, 7. 

Rentals : 

Canada — 

statement of Hon. D. C. Abbott, Minister 

of Finance, on continuance of rental 

and eviction controls, 486. 
rent and eviction controls uneflected by 

decontrol measures, 1545. 
annual report of W.P.T.B. (1946), 603. 
legislative recommendation of C.C.C.L., 501. 
resolution adopted by C.C. of L., 1581. 
U.SA.: enactment of legislation providing for 

new rent controls, urged by C.I.O., 

1776. 

Reports : 

See Labour Departments and Bureaus; var- 
ious subject headings. 

Representation : 

See Labour Representation. 

Research : 

Canada — 
report on Research and Scientific Expendi- 
ture of Dominion G-overnment (1938- 
1946) tabled in House of Commons, 
50&. 
establishment of clinics for research work 
on certain diseases requested by 
C.C. of L., 1585. 



Retail Trade: 

U.S.A.— 

trends in department store unionization, 
1127. 

Rhine Navigation: 

See Navigation. 

Roebuck, Hon. Senator Arthur: 

sponsors motion authorizing Standing Com- 
mittee on Immigration and Labour to 
study immigration problems, 779. 

Royal Commissions: 

summary of report of Royal Commission on 

Coal tabled in House of Commons, 302- 

10. 
legislative resolution of C.C. of L. re Royal 

Commission on Espionage, 490. 
establishment of Royal Commission to study 

creation of new industries in Maritime 

provinces recommended by T. and L.C, 

497. 
Man.: report of Royal Commission on Adult 

Education, 1089. 

Rubber Industry: 

Canada — 
wage rates, hours and working conditions in 

the rubber products industry, 1164. 
"open-end wage clause" contained in recent 
collective agreement, 1411. 

Sabotage : 

U.S.A.— 

picketing and sabotage, in Texas, prohibited 
under legislation governing public utili- 
ties, 1414. 



lvi 



INDEX 



Safety : 

Governing Body of I.L.O. authorizes factory 

safety conference to draft Model Code 

of Safety Provisions for Factories, 786. 

recommendations or resolutions of I.L.O. 

Committees — 

building, civil engineering and public 

works, 143. 
coal mining, 1119. 
iron and steel, 1769. 
petroleum, 314. 
textiles, 141. 
Canada — 

new regulations under Explosives Act, 196. 
provisions of collective agreements in the 

fishing industry (1947), 1430, 1443. 
window cleaners' code prepared by Cana- 
dian Standards Association, 775. 
use of colour to promote safety in facto-ries, 

789. 
recommendations of T. and L.C., 1575. 
Man.: promotion of safety in 1946 described 
in annual report of Department of 
Labour, 620. 
N.S.: revised regulations under Factories Act, 

1331. 
Que.: inspections during 1945, 117. 
Sask.: regulations under Factories Act gov- 
erning safety in motor vehicle repair 
shops, 1499; new regulations under 
Steam Boilers Act governing safe hand- 
ling of liquefied petroleum gas, 1499. 
United Kingdom: draft health and welfare 
regulations for the pottery industry 
issued under authority of Factories 
Act, 1752; measures to improve work- 
ing conditions in iron foundries recom- 
mended in report of Joint Advisory 
Committee, 1780; annual report of In- 
spector of Factories (1945), 152. 
France: regulations to ensure safe working 

near dangerous machinery, 1417. 
U.S.A.: Safety Code for Equipment in Baking 
Industry, 1758; federal mine safety code 
incorporated in new agreement in coal 
mines, 110O; recommendation of Na- 
tional Conference on Labour Legisla- 
tion, 206. 

St. Laurent, Rt. Hon. L. S., Secretary of 

State for External Affairs: 
announces extensive measure of decontrol. 

1545. 
reply to legislative proposals of T. and L.C.. 

497. 

St. Lawrence Waterways: 

R.T.B. re-affirms opposition to project, 955. 

Salaries : 

Canada — 

report on national income and expenditure 

issued by D.B. of S., 1866. 
labour income in Canada for period Janu- 
ary, 1946 to April, 1947, 1262; in June. 

1947, 1528. 
civilian salaries and wages (1938-1946) as 

shown in D.B. of S. report on national 

income, 311. 
report (with charts and tables) on post-war 

trend of real and money earnings in 

manufacturing, 949-53. 
U.S.A.: high level of production, employment 

and earnings reached, 921; dissolution 

of N.W.L.B. and review of wartime 

activities re salaries, 285. 



Sandwell, B. K., Canadian National Com- 
mittee on Refugees: 
summary of submission to Senate Standing 
Committee on Immigration and Labour, 
1109. 

Schools : 

Canada — 

bilingual training school for janitors and 
elevator operators opened. in Montreal, 
917. 
number of veterans completing training in 
private trade schools or business col- 
leges, 1756. 
enrolment in C.V.T. schools, 67, 212, 560-61, 

1031-33, 1189, 1478. 
assistance to vocational training schools in 
Quebec described at conference of 
Vocational Training Advisory Council, 
1673. 

B.C.: amendments in Public Schools Act, 1019. 

Man.: amendment in Public Schools Act, 1022. 

Ont.: regulations under School Attendance 
Act, 1025,- under Adolescent School 
Attendance Act, 1024; review of activi- 
ties of Provincial Institute of Textiles, 
1189. 

Que.: amendments in Specialized Schools Act 
re technical schools, 1489. 

Sask.: amendment in School Grants Act, 1493. 

United Kingdom: school-leaving age raised 
under Education Act (1944), 634. 
See also Trade Schools. 

Science : 

Canada — 

report on Research and Scientific Expendi- 
ture of Dominion Government (1938- 
1946) tabled in House of Commons, 503. 

report of W.B.T.P. on scientific and profes- 
sional employment during 1946-47. 710. 

legislative recommendation of R.T.B. re 
scientific medical research, 955. 

Seamen : 

Canada — 

amendment in Merchant Seamen Compensa- 
tion Act (1946), 1327. 

time-limit for application extended under 
Merchant Seamen Special Bonus Order. 
196. 
United Kingdom: provisions of agreements 
negotiated by National Maritime Board 
re post-war employment conditions in 
merchant ships, 633. 

Seasonal Employment: 

See Employment. 

Senate : 

Canada — 

meetings of Standing Committee on Immi- 
gration and Labour, 779-85, 1108. 

Senate Standing Committee on Immigra- 
tion: 

See Standing Committee on Immigration 
and Labour. 

Seniority: 

Canada — 

provisions of collective agreements in fish- 
ing industry, 1435, 1442. 



INDEX 



lvii 



Service (Laundries) : 

Canada — 

increase in wage rate index in 1946, 771. 

Seven Days' Notice: 

Man. — 

legislative resolution defeated, 1023. 

Sheet Metal Workers: 

U.S.A.— 

discharge provided for in incentive wage 
scheme, 1249. 

Shelter: 

Canada — 

annual report of W.P.T.B. (1946), 603. 

Shifts: 

Canada — 
shift work as reported by certain indus- 
tries: — 

agricultural implements, 1538. 

brewery products, 995. 

edible plant products — flour milling, 1855; 
bread and cake baking, 1857; biscuit 
manufacturing, 1860; confectionery 
manufacturing, 1863 

electrical machinery and apparatus, 1726. 

meat products, 1852. 

motor vehicle parts and accessories, 1535. 

motor vehicles, 1170. 

pulp and paper, 989. 

radio sets and parts, 1730. 

rubber products, 1165. 

sawmill products, 1378 — planing mill, 
sash and door, 1382; wooden furniture, 
1386. 
Que.: permits issued during 1945-46, 1688. 
United Kingdom: provisions of Factories 
(Hours of Employment in Factories 
Using Electricity) Order, 1947, 1413; 
recommendations of Committee 
appointed to study economic need and 
social consequences of double-day shifts, 
1268. 
U.S.A.: legislation governing women employed 
in factories in New York state, 285. 

Shipbuilding: 

Canada — 

functions of Canadian Maritime Commis- 
sion, 1325; re appointment of, 1093. 

United Kingdom: situation in shipbuilding 
industry in 1947 outlined in White 
Paper on Economic Survey for 19J t 1, 
509; safety and health in shipyards — 
annual report of Inspector of Factories 
(1945), 152. 

U.S.A.: company required to pay for "portal" 
time, 921. 

Shipping: 

Canada — 

agreement reached in Great Lakes shipping 
dispute, 1247. 

functions of Canadian Maritime Commis- 
sion, 1325; re appointment of, 1093. 

recommendations of C.C. of L., 1585. 

legislative recommendations of T. and L.C., 
497; other recommendations, 1575. 
L'nited Kingdom: provisions of agreements 
negotiated by National Maritime 
Board re post-war employment condi- 
tions in merchant ships, 633. 

Shop Cards : 

See Legal Decisions. 



Shops : 

B.C.— 

regulations under Shops Regulations and 
Weekly Half-Holiday Act, 1335; 
amendments in Act, 1018. 
Man. : new regulations under Minimum Wage 
Act governing manufacturing shops, 
offices, etc., 552; inclusion of gasoline 
service stations under Shops Regula- 
tion Act, 1022. 

See also Department Stores. 

Sick Leave : 

Canada — 
provisions of sick leave with pay in certain 

industries: — 
agricultural implements, 1537. 
brewery products, 995. 
edible plant products — flour milling, 1854; 

bread and cake baking, 1857; biscuit 

manufacturing, 1860; confectionery 

manufacturing, 1862. 
electrical machinery apparatus, 1726, 

1730. 
meat products. 1851. 
motor vehicle parts accessories, 1534. 
motor vehicles, 1169. 
pulp and paper, 989. 
radio sets and parts, 1726, 1730. 
rubber products, 1165. 
sawmill products, 1377 — planing mill, sash 

and door, 1382; wooden furniture, 1385. 
LT.S.A.: paid vacations and sick leave in 

1945-46, 1602. 
See also Medical Services. 

Silicosis : 

See Diseases, Industrial. 

Skelton, Alex, Director-General of Economic 
Research, Department of Reconstruc- 
tion and Supply: 
summary of submission to Senate Standing 
Committee on Immigration and Labour, 
1110. 

Skilled Labour: 

United Kingdom — 

scheme for training juveniles in skilled 
trades, 1567. 

Social Aid: 

Sask:— 

provisions of Social Aid Act (1947), 1495. 

Social Insurance : 

United Kingdom — 

Commonwealth Conference on Social Insur- 
ance, 776. 
See also Social Security. 

Social Policy: 

conventions on social conditions in 
dependent territories adopted at 
thirtieth session of I.L.O., 1594. 

Social Research: 

See Research. 



Mil 



INDEX 



Social Security : 

Inter-American Conference on Social 
Security, 778. 

recommendation of building, civil engine- 
ering and public works committee of 
I.L.O., at meeting in Brussels, 144. 

world wide extension of social services 
recommended by textiles committee of 
I.L.O., 141. 

international co-operation towards better 
standards of living — text of article 
reprinted from United Nations Weekly 
Bulletin, 145. 
Canada — 

resolution adopted by C.C. of L., 1582-83. 

implementation of Dominion-wide plan on 
contributory basis for all citizens urged 
by T. and L.C., 1573. 
B.C.: legislative resolution, 1020. 
N.S.: federal program discussed at Indus- 
trial Relations Conference of the 
Maritime Bureau of Industrial Rela- 
tions, 20. 
Sask.: legislative resolution, 1496. 
Australia: referendum on social services, 
employment conditions and marketing, 
286. 
United Kingdom: Commonwealth Conference 

on Social Insurance, 776. 
Czechoslovakia: proceedings of plenary 
session of General Council of Trade 
Unions, 1777. 
U.S.A.: worker security plans in collective 
agreements — development of health and 
welfare and guaranteed wage plans, 
319; changes in program recommended 
by Social Security Board in annual 
report, 283; A.F. of L. requests in- 
crease in social security tax, 1774, and 
advocates amendment to Act re old 
age insurance benefits, 1774, resolution 
adopted, 1774; establishment of strong, 
unified national system sought by 
C.I.O., 1776. 

Soft Coal: 

See Coal. 

Spruce Falls Power and Paper Company, 
Limited : 

foremen's union certified by Ontario Labour 
Relations Board, 277. 

Staal, A. D., International Labour Organiza- 
tion : 
extracts from address at convention of 
T. and L.C., 1571. 

Stabilization: 

Canada — 
stabilization of employment in automobile 
and parts industry, 290. 

Staff Training: 

See Training. 

Standard of Living: 

Canada — 

mine workers' living standards discussed 
in report of Royal Commission on 
Coal, 306. 



Standards : 

Canada — 

permanent organization of Government 
Standards Division recommended by 
C.C. of L., 1585. 
Australia: recommendations of Conference 
of Commonwealth and state labour 
ministers, 1822. 
See also American Standards Association; 
National Bureau of Standards. 

Standing Committee on Immigration and 
Labour: 

Senate studies immigration problems — 
proceedings of meetings, 779-85, 1108. 
report, 1111. 

Stangroom, Eric, Department of Labour: 
text of article on Unemployment Insurance 

and Health, 388. 
death of, 630. 

Statistics : 

sixth International Conference of Labour 
Statisticians, 1595. 

I.L.O. conference on labour statistics in 
Montreal, 1123. 

recommendations of I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Inland Transport re 
preparation of labour statistics, 1121. 
Canada — 

legislative recommendations of C.C. of L. 
re industrial and labour statistics, 499. 
United Kingdom: ratification of I.L.O. con- 
ventions governing statistics of wages 
and hours of work, 1123. 

See also Employment and Industrial 
Statistics. 

Statistics, Dominion Bureau of: 

increase in Canada's population indicated 

in annual estimate, 835. 
statement of Herbert Marshall, Dominion 

Statistician, at meeting of Standing 

Committee on Immigration and 

Labour, 784. 
sample survey of non-fatal accidents and 

fires on farms, 1887. 
revised housing figures for 1946, 774. 
new housing completed in 1946, 629. 
farm income during 1946, 487. 
increase in farm wage rates, 912. 
survey of civilian labour force, 727, 1350. 
labour income in June, 1947, 1528. 

Publications and Reports — 

Wages, Salaries and Supplementary Labour 
Income in Canada by Months. 
January, 1946, to April, 1947, 1262; 
report (with table) on national in- 
come, 311; National Accounts Income 
and Expenditure (1938-1946), 1866: 
1947 edition of official handbook 
"Canada". 632; sales and financing of 
motor vehicles in 1946. 1393; The Manu- 
facturing Industries of Canada (1945). 
1258; annual review of emplovment 
and payrolls (1946). 1529; "Benefit 
Years" under Unemployment Insur- 
ance Act, 1042. 

Statutory Holidays: 

See Holidays. 

Steam Boilers: 

See Boilers. 



INDEX 



lix 



Steam Railways: 

See Railways. 

Steel Industry: 

meeting (second session) of I.L.O. Com- 
mittee on Iron and Steel, in Stock- 
holm, 1766. 

Canada — 

appointment of steel controller termin- 
ated, 124. 
recommendations of C.C. of L., 1585. 

United Kingdom: guaranteed work week in 
iron and steel industry, 7; production 
program for 1947 outlined in White 
Paper on Economic Survey for 1947, 
509; resolution defeated at convention 
of T.U.C., 1589. 

U.S.A.: collective bargaining in steel indus- 
try, 657; revision of wage structures 
and job classifications, 283; basic wage 
rate in steel industry up 131 per cent 
in 10 years, 921; management-labour 
time study and production methods at 
iron and steel corporation, 1415. 

Stirrett, J. T., General Manager, Canadian 
Manufacturers' Association: 
report at annual meeting of CM .A., 1114. 

Stores : 

See Department Stores; Shops. 

"Strike Pay": 

Canada — 

exemption from income tax, 483. 

Strike Votes: 

Canada — 

text of award of Hon. Mr. Justice C. P. 
McTague, in meat packing industry, 
1794., 
trade union prohibited from taking strike 
vote during period of collective bar- 
gaining under proposed Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation 
Act, 925, 934. 
'abolition of order providing for taking 
of strike votes at request of employer, 
urged by C.C. of L., 499. 

N.S.: provision of new Trade Union Act, 
1329. 

U.S.A.: provision of Labour-Management 
Relations Act, 948. 

Strikes and Lockouts: 

work stoppages increased in five countries 

in 1946, 1101. 
resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 

Comimittee on Inland Transport, 1121. 
Canada — 

number of strikes and time-loss in 1946, 

5. 
arbitration award of Hon. Mr. Justice 

C. P. McTague in meat packing 

dispute, 1753, 1791-96. 
settlement of dispute over vacations with 

pay for railway employees, 1561. 
industrial conditions reviewed in report 

on man-power situation (1946), 648-49. 
collective agreement makes employees of 

lumber firm liable for illegal strike, 

911. 



Strikes and Lockouts — Con. 

causes of strikes and work stoppages in 
mining industry reviewed in report of 
Royal Commission on Coal, 309. 

prohibition of strikes and lockouts during 
period of collective bargaining under 
proposed Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act, 925, 934. 

monthly summary of strikes and lockouts 
in Canada, 99, 256, 457, 594, 749, 893, 
1067, 1224, 1388, 1539, 1731, 1871. 

strikes and lockouts in Canada during 
1946, and from 1901-1946 and 1914- 
1946 (with charts and tables), 421-51. 

strikes and lockouts in Canada and other 
countries in 1946 and 1919-1946 (with 
tables), 453-56. 

recommendations of C.M.A., 1114. 
C.C. of L. — resolution re packinghouse 
workers' strike, 1582; urges abolition 
of order providing for taking of strike 
votes at request of employer, 499; 
legislative recommendations re injunc- 
tions, 500; decision of convention on 
strike fund, 1585. 
recommendation of T. and L.C. re injunc- 
tions, 1575. 

B.C.: provisions of Industrial Conciliation 
and Arbitration Act, 1017. 

N.S.: statistics for 1946, 1090. 

Que.: statistics for 1945-46, 117, 1685-86. 

Sask.: annual report of Department of 
Labour (1946), 770. 

Other Countries — 

strikes and lockouts in Great Britain and 
other countries, 101, 258, 460, 597, 
752, 898, 1071, 1228, 1392, 1544, 1731, 
1871. 

strikes and lockouts in Canada and other 
countries in 1946 and 1919-1946 (with 
tables), 453-56. 

New Zealand: secret ballot before striking 
required of trade unionists in amend- 
ment to Industrial Conciliation and 
Arbitration Act, 1759. 

U.S.A.: foremen's strike at Ford Motor 
Company, Detroit, terminated, 1100; 
report on soft-coal strike — legal pro- 
ceedings, termination, 9; provisions 
of Labour-Management Relations Act, 
944: enactment of legislation to curb 
jurisdictional disputes, 1414; strike to 
enforce violation of Act ruled illegal 
ibv N.L.R.B., 284: changes in policy 
of N.L.R.B. re interpretation of Wag- 
ner Act, 490; arbitration procedure 
established in building trades, 282; 
prohibition of strikes and lockouts in 
certain states, by legislation governing 
public utilities, 1414; compulsorv arbi- 
tration in public utilities in Indiana 
and New Jersey, 638; unemployment 
benefits denied strikers in state of 
Michigan, 1324; strikes in public ser- 
vice prohibited in New York state, 493; 
payment of unemployment insurance 
benefits to strikers recommended by 
C.I.O., 1776; recommendations of Na- 
tional Association of Manufacturers, 10. 

See also Legal Decisions. 



!x 



INDEX 



Strikes and Lockouts — Con. 

Classification by Industries: 

Construction — buildings and structures— 

building insulation workers, Toronto, 1875. 

carpenters 1 , Brockville, 896; Cornwall, 596, 
750', 1227, 1.390, 1541, 1736; Kingston, 
89-6; St. Catharines, 896; Saint John, 
897, 1543, 1734; Saskatoon, 897, 1069'. 

carpenters and helpers', Fort William and 
Port Arthur, 896, 1609. 

carpenters and labourers, Borden, P.E.I., 
1070- Edmundston, 1070; London, 1070; 
Windsor Mills, 100. 

electricians, Windsor, 897, 1069. 

hoisting engineers, Hamilton <and Toronto, 
806. 

labourers, Cornwall, 1391; MJagog, 1070; 
Medicine Hat, 752; Port Union, 1227, 
1736; Toronto, 897; Windsor, 896. 

lathers, Windsor, 1070. 

painters, Toronto, 1391. 

plumbers, Windsor, 752. 

plumbers and steamfitters, Winnipeg, 896. 

plumbers, steamfitters and helpers, Mont- 
real and district, 1875. 

steel erectors, Montreal, 459. 
Fishing and Trapping — 

fishermen, Gulf of Georgia, 458', 595; Nova 
Scotia, 100, 257, 458, 595. 
Manufacturing — animal foods — 

dairy .and poultry plant workers, Melville, 
1226, 1389, 1540, 1733, 1873. 

packing plant workers, Charlottetown, 
Sydney, Moncton, Hull, Montreal, 
Princeville, Quebec, Kitchener, Peter- 
borough, Toronto, St. Boniface, Win- 
nipeg, Moose Jaw, Prince Albert, 
Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton, 
NeAV Westminster and Vancouver, 11391. 
1540, 1733. 

meat packing plant workers, St. Boniface, 
257. 
Manufacturing — boots and shoes {leather) — 

shoe factory workers. Kitchener, 257, 458; 
Montreal, 17>34, 1873. 
Manufacturing — fur and leather products — 

fur processing factory workers, Toronto, 
1735. 

fur products factory workers, Toronto, 
1542, 1733. 

leather products factory workers, Montreal. 
1735. 

tannery workers, Oshawa, 750, 895, 1226. 
1389, 1540'. 
Manufacturing — metal products — 

automotive parts factory workers, Ottawa, 
357 (strike after Conciliation Board 
procedure) . 

bicycle and sports equipment factory 
workers, Weston, 1736, 1874. 

costume jewellery factory workers, Toronto, 
459, 595. 

electrical apparatus factory workers. 
Kitchener, 1543, 1734; Toronto, 1391, 
1541', 1735; Waterloo, 1060. 

farm implement factory workers, Brantford, 
751; Pont Rouge, 1735. 

foundry workers, Brockville, 1301. 1541, 
1734; Cobourg, 1070; New Glasgow, 
1735, 1873; Owen Sound, 751: 
(moulders), Sackville, 751; Sarnia, 
459; Toronto, 1736, 1874'. 

iron and steel mill workers (structural 
steel factory workers), Burnaby and 
Vancouver, 1391, 1541, 1734, 1873, 



Strikes and Lockouts — Con. 

Classification by Industries — Con. 

jewellery factory workers, Toronto, 1735. 

machinists, Vancouver, 596. 

metal factory workers, Belleville, 1735. 

1873, 1874; Cornwall, 596; Fort Erie. 

896, 1069; Hamilton, 154®; Montreal. 

896, 1226, 1390; Ottawa, 459, 595, 750. 

1008, 1390, 1541, 1734; Peterborough. 

1543; Ridgetown, 895, 1543; St. 

Catharines, 596, 890; Sarnia, 1735. 

1873; Trenton, 896; Weston, 751; 

Windsor, 1391, 1541. 
motor vehicle factory workers, Oshawa. 

751. 
moulders, North Sydney, 1301, 1541. 
sheet metal workers, Ottawa, 896, 1009. 
steel products factory workers, Oshawa. 

1226, 1390. 
structural steel factory workers, Van- 
couver, 154&, 1734. 
wire cloth factory workers', Niagara Falls. 

1874. 
Manufacturing — miscellaneous products — 
sporting goods factory workers, Leaside. 

1543. 
Manufacturin g — miscellaneous wood 

products- 
box factory workers, Montreal, 1542, 1733: 

Prince Albert, 1226, 1390. 
furniture factory workers, Hanover, 1069. 

1225, 1389, 1542; Montmagny, P.Q.. 

751; Montreal, 1069, 1542; New West- 
minster, Vancouver and Victoria, 1542. 

1733; Waterloo, 751. 
planing mill workers, Peterborough, 751. 
sash and door factory workers, Edmonton, 

1391, 1541, 1733. 
sawmill workers, Cache Bay, 1226; Merritt, 

1735, 1873; Nanaimo, 1226; Penticton. 

459, 59-5; Wahnapitae, 1226, 1390; 

Whitby, 1735. 
wood products factory workers, Beresford, 

N.B.. 257; Grand'mere, 751; Lachute 

Mills, 895, 1068, 1225, 1389, 1541: 

Prince Albert, 100; Stratford, 751. 
Manufacturing— non-metallic minerals, chem- 
icals, etc. — 
asbestos products factory workers. St. 

Lambert, 751, 1543', 1734, 1874. 
brick and tile factory workers, Medicine 

Hat, 1301. 
chemical factory workers, Bishopric, 1736. 

1874; Medicine Hat, 1227; Palo, Sask.. 

1543, 1734. 
china and pottery factory workers. 

Medicine Hat, 1391, 1541, 1734. 
clay products factory workers, Medicine 

Hat, 1227. 
fireclay products factory workers, Acton, 

1070, 1225, 1390. 
glass factory workers, Redcliff, 896. 
lime products factory workers, Saint John, 

896. 
optical lens factory workers, Belleville. 

1875. 
Manufacturing — printing and publishing — 
compositors, etc., Ottawa, Hamilton, Edmon- 
ton, and Vancouver, 100, 257, 458, 595, 

750. 
printing plant workers, Elora, 1735. 
Manufacturing — pulp, paper and paper 

products — 
paper products factorv workers. Chamblv. 

751, 1068, 1225, 1389, 1541. 1733, 1873. 



INDEX 



Strikes and Lockouts — Con. 
Classification by Industries — Con. 
Manufacturing — rubber and its products — 
rubber factory workers, Bowmanville, 895. 

Manufacturing — shipbuilding — 

pipefitters, plumbers and joiners, Montreal, 

1786. 
plumbers and steamfitters, Montreal, 1391. 
shipyard workers, Victoria, 751. 

Manufacturing — textiles, clothing, etc. — 

clothing factory workers, Louiseville, 1542, 
1733.; Montreal, 750. 

knitting factory workers, Montreal, 1735. 

textile factory workers, Cornwall, 100, 
1391; Drummondville, Magog, Mont- 
morency and Sherbrooke, 1874; Granby, 
1735; Huntingdon, 458, 595; Lachute 
Mills, 750, 1068, 1225, 1389, 1540; 
Louiseville, 458, 459, 1542; Montreal, 
1873; St. Johns, 1069, 1225. 

woollen mill workers, Brandon, 1226. 
Manufacturing — tobacco and liquors — 

soft drink factory workers, Winnipeg, 750. 

Manufacturing — vegetable foods — 

bakery workers, Peterborough, 1069; 

Regina, 895; Winnipeg, 1542. 
candy factory workers, Toronto, 1874. 
food products factory workers, Vancouver, 

257, 458, 595, 750. 
vegetable products factory workers, Port 

Credit, 895, 1068, 1225, 1734, 1873, 

Mining— metal — 

basic refractories mine and mill workers, 

Kilmar, 1390. 
copper and zinc mine and mill workers, 

Sherridon, 1390, 1540, 1733, 1873, 

Mining — non-ferrous smelting and quarry- 
ing — 

coal miners, Drumheller, 595, 895; Glace 
Bay, 257, 1069; Nanaimo, 1226; 
(brushers), New Waterford, 1734; 
(loaders), New Waterford, 1542; Nova 
Scotia, 895, 1068; Nova Scotia and 
New Brunswick, 458, 595, 750. 

gold and copper miners, and smelter 
workers, Noranda, 106, 257, 458. 

gold miners, Bralorne, 895; Noranda, 181, 
357; (strike after Conciliation Board 
procedure) ; Premier, B.C., 1874. 

metal miners, British Columbia, 160. 

Miscellaneous — 

warehousemen and truckers, Calgary, 100. 

■Service — business and personal — 

beverage room tapmen and waiters, 

Schumacher and Timmins, 1875. 
burglar and fire alarm protection workers, 

Hamilton and Toronto, 459, 595; 

Montreal, 596. 
dry cleaners and dyers, Sudbury, 1670. 
elevator operators and janitors, Vancouver, 

1737. 
hotel employees, Moose Jaw, 1676; River- 
side, 1227. 
laundry and dry cleaning plant workers; 

Fort William and Port Arthur, 1227, 

L396, 1541. 
laundry workers, Moose Jaw, 258; Nanaimo, 

1670, 1226, 1390. 
waiters, Toronto, 1544. 
"waiters .and bartenders, Sudbury, 1227, 

13-90. 
waitresses, Kelowna, 1227. 



Strikes and Lockouts — Con. 
Classification by Industries — Con. 
Service — public administration — 

ammunition depot workers, Renous, 100. 

civic labourers, Duncan, 1070. 

civic workers, Bridgew.ater, 897; Montreal, 
1544; New Glasgow, 867; Sydney 
Mines, N.S., 752. 

municipal workers, Township of York, 1875. 

town labourers, Liverpool, 1736. 
Service — recreation — 

lifeguards, Toronto, 1392. 
Trade — 

coal and building supplies handlers, Win- 
nipeg, 459. 

coal handlers, Victoria, 1736. 

dairy workers, drivers, etc., Cornwall, 1875. 

flour, feed and coal handlers, Montreal, 897. 

fruit and confectionery warehouse workers. 
Edmonton, 1392, 1541. 

fuel and building supplies, handlers, Wind- 
sor, 1875. 

retail grocery clerks, Montreal, 1736. 

seed packers, Brandon, 267, 458, 

tailors, Vancouver, 752. 
Transportation — electric railways and local 
bus lines — 

bus drivers, Winnipeg, 257. 

bus drivers and mechanics, Chatham, 100, 
257. 

electric railway, light and power plant 
workers, Cornwall, 1392, 1543. 

street railway workers, Nanaimo, New 
Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria, 
1736, 1874. 
Transportation and Public Utilities — elec- 
tricity and gas — 

electricians and linemen, Bridgewater, 1392. 
Transportation and Public Utilities — other 
local and highway — 

bus drivers, Sydney, 1070', 1226. 

taxi drivers, Toronto, 1392. 

truck drivers, Moose Jaw, 459; Windsor. 
897, 1069, 1225. 

truck drivers, helpers and warehousemen, 
Edmonton, 1392. 

Transportation — water — 

freight handlers, Cap de la Madeleine, 
1070; Summerside, 897. 

freight handlers, truck drivers, etc., New- 
castle, 1544. 

seamen, Fort William, 1643, 1736; Halifax, 
596, 1544. 

Students : 

See Education; Employment Service; Uni- 
versities; Veterans Affairs, Depart- 
ment of. 

Subsidies : 

Canada — 

withdrawal of subsidies on decontrolled 

items, 1645. 
government policy reviewed in annual 

report (1946) of W.P.T.B., 600-01. 

Sugar Beet Industry: 

movement of sugar beet workers between 
Canada and United States, 1763. 
Canada — 

admission of workers from Europe, for 
employment on sugar farms, 629. 



Ixii 



INDEX 



Sullivan, J. A., Secretary-Treasurer. Trades 
and Labour Congress of Canada: 
resignation, 490. 

Sunday Labour: 

Canada — 

Sunday ivork in certain industries: — 
brewery products, 995. 
fishing, 1433. 
motor vehicles, 1169. 
pulp and paper, 989, 993. 
rubber products, 1165. 
text of award of Hon. Mr. Justice C. P. 
McTague in meat packing dispute, 1796. 
legislative recommendation of C.C.C.L., 502. 
Sask.: inclusion of certain classes of workers 
under One Day's Rest in Seven Act, 
1336. 

Supervisors : 

Canada — 

training for industrial supervisors -and fore- 
men under C.V.T., 66, 67, 713. 
staff training program in Dominion Civil 
Service, 1246. 
U.S.A.: dissolution of supervisory employees' 
union, 1100-; administrative training 
course for supervisory employees insti- 
tuted by Ford Motor Company, 1415. 

Supreme Court of Canada: 

See Legal Decisions. 

Surveys: 

See various subject headings. 

Sweden : 

study on collective agreements, 1124. 

Switzerland : 

ratification of I.L.O. convention governing 
minimum wage fixing machinery, 1123. 

Taft-Hartley Labour-Management Relations 

Act (U.S.A.): 

enactment, 943-48. 

Take-Home Pay: 

U.S.A.— 

report on soft-coal strike resulting from 
demand for reduced work week, 9. 

Tallon, R. J., Unemployment Insurance 

Commission : 
extracts from address at convention of T. 
and L.C., 1570. 

Taxation : 

Canada — 

resolutions adopted by C.C. of L., 1581. 
recommendations of T. and L.C. re income 
tax and excise profits tax, 1575. 

Alta.: provisions of Town and Village Act re 
municipal and school taxes, 839.'; recom- 
mendations of Federation of Labour, 
259. 

B.C.: legislative resolution, 1020. 

U.S.A.: removal of federal payroll tax on 
wage workers requested by A.F. of L., 
1774. 

See also Income Tax. 
Teachers : 

Canada — 

recommendations of C.C. of L., 1585. 
B.C.: amendments in Public Schools Act, 1019. 



Technical Education: 

Que. — 

amendments in Specialized Schools Act re 
technical schools, 1489. 

Technical Personnel: 

Canada — 

geographical distribution of professional 
openings in Canada, 1564. 

survey of professional openings — future 
employment opportunities . for univer- 
sity-trained personnel, 1093. 

See also Bureau of Technical Personnel; 
Wartime Bureau of Technical Per- 
sonnel. 

Telephones : 

See Communications. 

"Temporary Incapacity" Awards: 

Canada — 

number of awards granted to veterans, 213, 
558. 

Termination of Employment: 

See Employment. 

Textile Industry: 

first meeting of Textiles Committee of 
I.L.O. in Brussels, 139; resolution of 
Committee re development of textile 
industry in Germany and Japan, 141. 
submission of resolutions of Industrial 
Committee to Governments and United 
Nations authorized by Governing Body 
of I.L.O., 787. 
Canada — 
annual report of W.P.T.B. (1946), 602. 
admission of labour from Europe for 
employment in mills of Dionne Spin- 
ning Mill Company, 629, 1412. 
Ont.: review of activities of Provincial 

Institute of Textiles, 1189. 
United Kingdom: statistics re distribution of 
man-power in textiles and clothing 
industry, 508. 

Thompson, R. F., Director, Canadian Voca- 
tional Training : 

reports at meetings of Vocational Training 
Advisory Council, 855, 1670, 1673. 

remarks at conference of Regional Dir- 
ectors, on pre-matriculation classes, 
1674. 

Thomson, G. W., President, British Trades 

Union Congress : 
extracts from address at annual conference 
of T.U.C., 1588. 

Time-loss : 

time-loss through work stoppages in five 
countries in 1946, 1101. 
Canada — 

time-loss through strikes in 1946. 5. 
provisions of collective agreements in fish- 
ing industry, 1437, 1438. 
B.C.: time-loss bv industry through accidents 
in 1946, 1088. 

Time Study: 

U.S.A.— 

success of management-labour time study 
and production methods, 1415. 



INDEX 



lxiii 



Tobacco : 

movement of tobacco workers from United 
States to Canada, 1763. 
United Kingdom: distribution of man-power 
in tobacco industry, 508. 

Trade: 

United Kingdom — 

resolution adopted by T.U.C., 1580. 

Trade Schools : 

Alta — 

revised regulations under Trade Schools 
Regulation Act, 1497. 

Trade Union Membership : 

Canada — 

membership during 1946 as reported in 36th 
annual report on labour organization, 
1259. 

Sask.: annual report of Department of 
Labour (1946), 770. 

India: membership in 1938-39 and 1942-43, 
1736. 

Netherlands: membership as at January 1, 
1947, 1759. 

U.S.A.: union membership in 1946, 636, 777; 
unionization of white collar workers, 
637; trends in department store union- 
ization, 1127. 

Trade Unions: 

United Nations approves I.L.O. resolution 
on freedom of association, 1764. 

report of Committee of the Conference at 
the thirtieth session of I.L.O., 1592-93. 

United Nations requests I.L.O. to study 
trade union rights, 788. 

plan for collaboration between public auth- 
orities and employers' and workers' 
organizations approved by Governing 
Body of I.L.O., 787. 

recommendations of Building, Civil Engin- 
eering and Public Works Committee of 
I.L.O., at meeting in Brussels, 145. 

resolution adopted by sub-committee of 
I.L.O. Committee on Petroleum, 315. 
World Federation of Trade Unions: — 

proposed affiliation of German trade unions 
discussed at fifth Inter-zonal Confer- 
ence of Trade Unions, 1777. 

relations with I.L.O., 1595. 

continued support of C.I.O., 177'6. 

legislative recommendation of C.C. of L., 
499; report of C. H. Millard to con- 
vention of, 1584. 
Canada — 

annual conventions of labour organizations: 
T. and L.C., 1568; C.C. of L., 1576; 
C.C.C.L., 1586. 

resolution of C.C. of L., 1579. 

recommendation of T. and L.C. re injunc- 
tions, 1575. 

union discipline for absenteeism, etc., 
established under recent collective agree- 
ment in clothing industry, 1411. 

legislative recommendation of C.C. of L. 
re World Federation of Trade Unions, 
499. 

Dominion legislative proposals of labour 
organizations: T. and L.C, 494; 
C.C. of L., 498; C.C.C.L., 501; R.T.B., 
955. 

members' "strike pay" exempt from income 
tax, 483. 



Trade Unions — Con. 

review of brochure on union-management 
cooperation at Lever Brothers Limi- 
ted, issued by Institute of Industrial 
Relations, University of Toronto, 632. 

unemployment in trade unions in 1946, 252. 

unemployment in trade unions >as at Dec- 
ember 31, 1946, 253; as at March 31, 
1947, 745; as at June 30, 1947, 1221; 
as at September. 30, 1947, 1718. 

Thirty-sixth Annual Report on Labour 
Organization in Canada, 1259. 

fiftieth anniversary of Ottawa Allied Trades 
and Labour Association, 1248. 

trade union film council plan — selection of 
films by National Labour Union Film 
Committee, 1247. 

minutes of early labour meetings presented 
to Department of Labour, 1247. 

recommendations of C.M.A., 1114. 

dual loyalty of Communist unions 'assailed 
by C.C. of L., 1098. 

summary of provisions and text of Industrial 
Relations Bill, No. 338 (Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation 
Act) designed to replace W.L.R.R. and 
I.D.I. Act, 923, 930; hearings of House 
of Commons Industrial Relations Com- 
mittee, 1102-7. 

certification of company-dominated unions 
prohibited under proposed Industrial 
Relations and _ Disputes Investigation 
Act, 927; hearings of House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
1102-7. 

Le Mouvement Ouvrier Canadien — book 
published by Department of Industrial 
Relations, Laval University, 917. 

bilingual training school for janitors and 
elevator operators opened in Montreal 
by Service Employees International 
Union, 917. 

union organization in coal mines outlined 
in report of Royal Commission on coal, 
302. 

collective bargaining in the fishing industrv 
(1947), 1426. 
Alta.: provisions of new Labour Act (con- 
solidation of Industrial Conciliation 
and Arbitration Act), 837, 843; con- 
vention of Federation of Labour, 258. 
B.C.: Court will not interfere with expulsion 
of union member in accordance with 
union laws, 554; _ trade union within 
scope of Industrial Conciliation and 
Arbitration Act may be prosecuted 
under that Act — strikers fined, 1337; 
trade union ruled legal entity, 1247; 
non-adoption of Bill to amend Trade- 
unions Act, 1020; Court awards 
damages against boilermakers' union 
for violating members' right to have 
application for reinstatement in union 
considered, 202. 
N.S.: regulations under Trade Union Act. 
1683; provisions of new Act, 1328; pro- 
visions of Fishermen's Federation Act, 
1330. 
Ont.: provisions of Police Act forbidding 
municipal police to join trade unions, 
etc., 841; Labour Relations Board cer- 
tifies foremen's union at Spruce Falls 
Power and Paper Company, Limited, 
Kapuskasing, 277. 



Ixiv 



INDEX 



Trade Unions — Con. 

Que.: damages awarded in Montreal for 
wrongful expulsion from union, 847; 
injunctions in shoe factory strike, 1340- 
41; Appeal Court quashes conviction for 
dismissing trade unionists, 1340; num- 
ber of agreements of certain labour 
bodies containing union security pro- 
visions, 134-35. 

Sask.: Supreme Court holds Labour Relations 
Board has legal status for purposes of 
Trade Union Act, 1341; new regulations 
Under Trade Union Act (1944), 1337; 
Labour Relations Board has no status 
to appeal question of jurisdiction' — 
unregistered union lacks capacity to 
appear in Court, 203; regulations under 
Public Service Act (1947), 1492; 
amendments in Trade Union Act 
(1944), 1491. 

Australia: conclusions of tripartite industrial 
conference held to establish industrial 
program to increase production, 1415. 

New Zealand: secret ballot before striking 
required of trade unionists in amend- 
ment to Industrial Conciliation and 
Arbitration Act, 1759. 

United Kingdom: proceedings of 79th con- 
ference of T.U.C., 1588; six trade 
unions in iron iand steel industry 
win guaranteed work week, 7; agree- 
ment reached between Machinists Union 
and employers' representatives provid- 
ing five-day week for machinists and 
related workers, 7. 

Belgium: proceedings of National Conference 
of Labour, 1605. 

Czechoslovakia: proceedings of plenary ses- 
sion of General Council of Czecho- 
slovakia Trade Unions, 1777. 

Germany: fifth Inter-zonal Conference of 
German Trade Unions, 1777. 

India: provisions of Act, 1730. 

Italy: statement of Italian General Confed- 
eration of Labour, 1778. 

Turkey: legal status of unions and employers' 
groups, 1417. 

U.S.A.: sixty-sixth annual convention of 
A.F. of L., 1773; ninth annual conven- 
tion of C.I.O., 1775; pension plan 
rejected by employees of Ford Motor 
Company, 1758; union interest in co- 
operative movement, 1567; Supreme 
Court holds that employers must bar- 
gain with foremen's unions, 556; public 
servants banned from joining labour 
unions in California, 493; Courts rule 
on veterans re-employment rights, 493: 
Supreme Court upholds bargaining 
rights of foremen, 492; changes in 
policy of N.L.R.B. re interpretation of 
Wagner Act, 490; findings of survey 
on collective bargaining with employer 
groups, 657; requests for arbitrators 
during 1946, 638; unionization of white 
collar workers, 637; A.F. of L. and 
C.I.O. discuss labour unity, 636; num- 
ber of representational cases received 
by N.L.R.B. during 1945-46, 635; admis- 
sion policies of labour unions, 1267; 
trends in department store unioniza- 
tion, 1127; collective bargaining devel- 
opments in union health and welfare 
plans, 1126; dissolution of supervisory 
employees' union, 1100; clothing 
workers receive simultaneous vacation 



Trade Unions — Con. 

period, llO'O; number of workers cov- 
ered by collective bargaining agree- 
ments in 1946, 919; legislation govern- 
ing public utilities in New Jersey, 62, 
in New York state, 62; report on trade 
union aspects of labour in the southern 
states, 18; officers' pension fund estab- 
lished by garment workers' union, 11; 
unionization of professional engineers 
and chemists, 10; labour relations pro- 
gram adopted at 51st convention of 
National Association of Manufacturers, 
10; unemployment benefits denied when 
open shop employment refused, 125; 
seek provision of worker security plans 
in collective agreements — growth of 
health and welfare and guaranteed 
wage plans, 319; closed shop banned in 
Tennessee and Arkansas, 282; enact- 
ment of legislation to curb jurisdictional 
disputes, 1414. 
See also Legal Decisions. 

Trades : 

United Kingdom — 

scheme for training juveniles in skilled 
trades, 1567. 

Trades and Labour Association: 

See Ottawa Allied Trades and Labour 
Association. 

Trades and Labour Congress of Canada: 

correction re fraternal delegates to conven- 
tion of British Trades Union Congress 
(1946), 127. 

number of agreements of affiliated unions 
containing union security provisions, 
134-35. 

extracts from President's New Year's mes- 
sage, 1, 2; from Labour Day message. 
1242. 

statement on Industrial Relations Bill, No. 
338 (Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act), 928. 

summary of submission to House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee. 
1104. 

acting secretary presents minutes of early 
labour meetings to Dominion Depart- 
ment of Labour, 1247. 

tabular report on union membership and 
local unions in Canada classified by 
affiliation, 1261. 

views on immigration presented at meeting 
of Standing Committee on Immigration 
and Labour, 781. 

appointment of John Buckley. acting 
secretary-treasurer. A. E. Hemming. 
associate secretary-treasurer, and resig- 
nation of J. A. (Pat) Sullivan, 
secretary-treasurer, 490. 

dominion legislative program, 404. 

proceedings of sixty-second convention, 1568. 

See also Bengough, Percy R. 

Trades Union Congress: 

See British Trades Union Congress. 

Traffic: 

See Highways. 



INDEX 



lxv 



Trainees : 

U.S. A.—. 

Supreme Court removes trainees from min- 
imum wage regulations, 284. 

Training : 

training facilities for textile workers recom- 
mended by Textiles Committee of 
I.L.O. at meeting in Brussels, 141. 
Canada — 

report of Director of C.V.T. on civilian 
training, 1671; position of U.I.C., 1672. 

job orientation training — induction program 
for government employees, directed by 
C.V.T., 489. 

staff training program in Dominion Civil 
Service, 1246. 

correspondence courses for U.I.C. personnel, 
1035. 

bilingual training school for janitors and 
elevator operators opened in Montreal, 
917. 

results of New Brunswick survey on veter- 
ans' training plan for employment, 65. 

training of ex-service women in western 
provinces, 384. 

improved training facilities for mine 
workers recommended in report of 
Royal Commission on Coal, 309. 
United Kingdom: scheme for training juven- 
iles in skilled trades, 1567; report on 
recruitment and training of nurses, 
1423. 
U.S.A.: administrative training course for 
supervisory employees instituted by 
Ford Motor Company, 1415. 

See also Canadian Vocational Training. 

Training-on-the-Job : 

Canada — 

allocation by C.V.T. of opportunities for 
veterans as discovered by N.E.S., 120. 

progress report made at conference of Voca- 
tional Training Advisory Council, 856. 

activities under C.V.T., 66. 67, 209, 212. 384, 
56>0. 561, 856, 1031-33, 1189, 1477-78, 
1674. 

number of veterans completing training 
under C.V.T., 1756. 

transfer of training from C.V.T. to D.V.A., 
1674. 

Transferred Workers : 

See Labour Transference. 

Transitional Measures Act (1947): 

See Continuation of Transitional Measures 
Act. 

Transport : 

United Kingdom: statistics re distribution of 
man-power, 508. 
See also Inland Transport. 

Transportation : 

second meeting of I.L.O. Industrial Com- 
mittee on Inland Transport, in Geneva, 
Switzerland, 1120. 
Canada — 

special clauses in collective agreements in 
fishing industry, 1432, 1434, 1443. 

D.B. of S. report on sales and financing of 
motor vehicles, 1393. 

man-power situation in 1946, 655. 

increase in wage rate index in 1946, 771. 



Transportation — Con. 

Alta.: new regulations under Apprenticeship 

Act governing motor vehicle repair 

trade, 196-97. 
Man.: amendments in Highway Traffic Act 

re minimum age of farm truck and 

speed tractor drivers, and chauffeurs, 

1023. 
U.S.A.: collective bargaining in railroad 

transportation, 657. 
See also Motor Vehicles. 
Truman, Harry S., President of the United 

States : 
approves arbitration procedure established 

in building trades, 282. 
message of disapproval on enactment of 

Labour-Management Relations Act, 943. 
signs Portal-to-Portal Pay Act, 777. 
recommendations concerning guaranteed 

wage studies, 491. 
presents first economic report to Congress, 

511. 
asks authority to reimpose controls in fight 

against inflation, 1757. 
extracts from letter to annual convention 

of C.I.O., 1775. 

Turkey : 

legal status of unions and employers' groups, 
1417. 

Unemployment : 

production and employment in iron and 
steel industry, 1767, and in metal 
trades, 1 770 — reports of International 
Labour Office presented at second ses- 
sion of I.L.O. Industrial Committee, 
1776. 

report of Committee on Employment, 
Unemployment and the Labour Force 
submitted to International Conference 
of Labour Statisticians, 1596. 
Canada — 

man-power situation in 1946, 648, 655. 

statement of Minister of Labour on transfer 
of unemployed persons from Nova 
Scotia, 625. 

report (with charts) on the problem of the 
older worker, 1251-58. 

unemployment in trade unions in 1946, 252. 

unemployment in- trade unions as at Dec- 
ember 31, 1946, 253; as at March 31, 
1947, 745; as at June 30, 1947, 1221; 
as at September 30, 1947, 1718. 
Man.: amendment in Municipal Act re 
"relief" benefits, 1023; provision of 
Relief Debt Adjustment Act, 1023. 
N.S.: statement of Minister of Labour on 
transfer of unemployed persons from 
Nova Scotia, 625; provisions of Nova 
Scotia Labour Act re employment pref- 
erence to residents, 1332. 
Ont.: amended regulations and new section 
under Unemployment Relief Act, 206, 
1499. 
Sask.: provisions of Social Aid Act, 1495. 
LT.S.A.: statistics for period October, 1945 — 
October 1946, 126; unemployment 
benefits denied when open shop 
employment refused, 125; unemploy- 
ment benefits denied strikers in state 
of Michigan, 1324. 



6384—5 



Jxvi 



INDEX 



Unemployment Insurance: 

Canada — 

new regulations under Unemployment 
Insurance Act require employers to 
report job vacancies, 483; text of reg- 
ulations, 569. 

amendment to Unemployment Insurance 
Coverage Regulations, 1946, Part 1, 
1682. 

extension of coverage, 1813. 

renewal of insurance books, 216-17 — purpose 
of renewal, general instructions. 

unemployment insurance contributions and 
benefits for veterans, 1812. 

determination of contributions for five-day 
or forty-hour week, 1757, 1812. 

refund of contributions, 1679. 

functions of Courts of Referees, 216. 

wage ceilings for contributions under 
unemployment insurance contributions, 
69. 

unemployed persons refusing work outside 
of Nova Scotia, not denied benefits, 626. 

payment of transportation expenses of 
workers transferred from Nova Scotia 
to central Canada, by U.I.C., 277. 

issuance of library catalogue by U.I.C., 1191. 

report on "benefit years" under Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Act, issued by D.B. 
of S., 1042. 

Unemployment Insurance and Health — text 
of article prepared by Mr. Eric S tang- 
room, Department of Labour, 388. 

meetings of National Employment Com- 
mittee (U.I.C.), 221, 708. 

C. A. L. Murchison, K.C., appointed com- 
missioner, 6, 916. 

appointment of Judge W. J. Lindal, as 
chairman of National Employment 
Committee, announced by U.I.C, 916. 

appointments to Advisory Committee of 
U.I.C., 916. 

correspondence courses for U.I.C. personnel, 
1035. 

monthly reports on activities of U.I.C, 70, 
218, 3.91, 563, 706, 858, 1036, 1190, 1319, 
1480, 1675, 1808. 

monthly reports (with tables) on unem- 
ployment insurance benefit, 70, 71-72, 
218-19, 391-93, 563-65, 706-8, 858-59, 
1036-37, 1190-92, 1319-21, 1 4-80-82, 1675- 
77, 1808-10. 

monthly reports (with table) on insurance 
registrations, 70, 218, 221, 392, 563, 564, 
700, 707, 858, 1030, 1190, 1319, 1481, 
1670, 1809. 

monthly reports (with table) on unemploy- 
ment insurance fund, 70, 73, 220-21, 392, 

394, 563, 566, 700, 860, 1038, 1193, 1322, 

1483, 1678, 1811. 

tabular report on unemployment insurance 
fund for period July 1, 1941, to Nov- 
ember 30, 1946, 73. 

monthly report (with table) on unemploy- 
ment insurance contributions, 70, 73, 
220, 221, 392, 394, 563, 566, 706, 860, 
1038, 1193, 1322, 1483, 1678, 1679, 1809, 
1811. 

tabular report on contributions for period 
July 1, 1941, to November 30, 1946, 73. 

digest of selected decisions of umpire under 
Unemployment Insurance Act, 74, 222, 

395, 567, 709, 861, 1039, 1194, 1323, 

1484, 1680, 1813. 



Unemployment Insurance — Con. 

amendments recommended by C.C.C.L., 502, 
1587; remarks of Minister of Labour, 
502. 

increased coverage and benefits under Act 
recommended by C.C. of L., 500; other 
amendments recommended, 1582. 

legislative recommendations of T. and L.C., 
495; remarks of Minister of Labour, 
498; extracts from .address of R. J. 
Tallon (labour's representative, U.I.C), 
at convention of, 1570; amendments in 
Act recommended, 1574-5. 

U.S.A.: statistics for period January — Nov- 
ember, 1946, 126; amendment in Rail- 
road Unemployment Insurance Act 
provides sickness benefits for workers, 
638; recommendations of National Con- 
ference on Labour Legislation, 206; 
unemployment benefits denied strikers 
in state of Michigan, 1324; recom- 
mendations of Social Security Board in 
annual report, 283; payment of benefits 
to strikers recommended by C.I.O., 1776. 

Unfair Labour Practices: 

Canada — 

provisions of Industrial Relations Bill, No. 
338 (Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act), 923, 924; text of 
Bill, 931; hearings of House of Com- 
mons Industrial Relations Committee, 
1102-7. 
recommendation of C.M.A., 1114. 

N.S.: provision of new Trade Union Act, 1329. 

U.S.A.: N.L.R.B. — dismisses unfair labour 
charge brought by United Steelworkers 
(C.I.O.), 491; upholds employer's right 
to report on negotiations. 491; number 
of cases filed with Board during 1945- 
46, 635. 
provisions of Labour-Management Relations 
Act, 947; enactment of legislation to 
curb jurisdictional disputes, 1414. 

See also Fair Labour Practices. 

Union Dues: 

Que.— 

number of agreements of C.C.C.L., T. and 
L.C, CC. of L., and other unions, con- 
taining check-off provisions, 135. 

Union-Management Co-operation: 

See Labour-Management Co-operation. 

Union Recognition : 

recommendation of Building, Civil Engin- 
eering and Public Works Committee of 
I.L.O., 145. 
Canada — 

number of collective agreements in fishing 
industry containing union recognition 
clause, 1429, 1441. 
U.S.A.: number of representational cases 
received by N.L.R.B. during 1945-46, 
635. 

Union Representation Votes: 

U.S.A.— 

annual report of N.L.R.B., 635. 



INDEX 



Union Security: 

Canada — 

recommendation of C.M.A., 1114. 
amendment in provincial Labour Relations 
Act (Quebec) requested by C.C.C.L., 
1087. 

Que.: types of union security provisions in 
collective agreements, indicated in sur- 
vey conducted by Industrial Relations 
Department of Laval University, 134-35. 

U.S.A.: union security in collective agree- 
ments in 1946, 919; number of workers 
covered by closed and union shop, main- 
tenance of membership, and check-off 
contracts in 1946, 636; trends in depart- 
ment store unionization, 1127; novel 
union shop clauses in collective agree- 
ments, 492; unemployment benefits 
denied when open shop employment 
refused, 125; closed shop banned in 
Arkansas and Tennessee, 282. 

Union Shop : 

definition, 135. 

Canada — 

union status in collective agreements in 
fishing industry, 1428, 1429, 1441. 

Que.: number of agreements of C.C.C.L., T. 
and L.C., C.C. of L., and other unions, 
containing union shop provisions, 135. 

U.S.A.: number of workers covered by union 
shop contracts in 1946, 636, 919; novel 
union shop clauses in collective agree- 
ments, 492; provisions of new agree- 
ments in coal mines, 1100. 

Union Status: 

See Union Shop. 

Unionization: 

See Trade Unions. 

United Automobile Workers of America: 

signs first guaranteed annual wage contract 
in automobile industry, 777. 

United Kingdom : 

See various subject headings. 

United Nations: 

agreement with I.L.O., 11. 

requests I.L.O. to study trade union rights, 

788; approves I.L.O. resolution, 1764. 
first meeting of Economic and Employment 

Commission, 312; second meeting, 1123. 
international co-operation towards better 

standards of living — text of article 

reprinted from United Nations Weekly 

Bulletin, 145-48. 
Canada's contribution through Mutual Aid, 

490. 
role 'of Canadian Government commended 

by C.C. of L., 498. 
provisions of Privileges and Immunities 

Act, 1328. 
See also International Labour Organization. 

United Nations Economic and Social 
Council : 

resolution adopted by C.I.O., 1776. 

Unity: 

See Labour Unity. 



Universities : 

Canada — 

obligation of veteran students in United 
States to return to Canada on gradua- 
tion, for employment, 771-72. 

university training under Federal rehab- 
ilitation plan, 213, 559, 915. 

survey of professional openings — future 
employment opportunities for univer- 
sity-trained personnel, 1093. 

employment trends in the professions- 
report (with charts) of Bureau of 
Technical Personnel, 1419. 

geographical distribution of professional 
openings in Canada, ISM. 

tabular report on number of university 
student veterans receiving D.V.A. allow- 
ances, 66". 

report (with table) on number of veterans 
receiving education benefits under Post- 
Discharge Re-establishment Order dur- 
ing period October, 1945 to October, 
1946, 63, 64. 

assistance to veterans taking university 
training under Federal rehabilitation 
program during 1946, 915. 

increased grants to veterans taking uni- 
versity training, requested by C.C. of L., 
500. 
N.S.; necessity of research facilities and 
trained staff stressed at Conference of 
Maritime Bureau of Industrial Rela- 
tions, 20. 
LT.S.A.: establishment of Institute of Indus- 
trial and Social Medicine as industrial 
health unit, 922. 

See also Cornell University; Dalhousie Uni- 
versity; Laval University; Montreal 
University; University of Toronto. 

University of Toronto: 

review of brochure on union-management 
co-operation at Lever Brothers Limited, 
issued by Institute of Industrial Rela- 
tions, 632. 

Vacations With Pay: 

resolutions adopted by Building, Civil 
Engineering and Public Works Com- 
mittee of I.L.O., at meeting in Brussels, 
144; by Textiles Committee of I.L.O., 
141. 
Canada — 

settlement of dispute over vacations with 

pay for railway employees, 1561. 
vacations ivith pay for workers in certain 
industries : — 

agricultural implements, 153*6, 1537. 

brewery products, 995, 998. 

edible plant products — flour milling, 1854, 
1856; bread and cake baking, 1857, 
1859; hiscuit manufacturing, 1860, 1862; 
confectionery manufacturing, 1862, 1865. 

electrical machinery and apparatus, 1725, 
1726. 

fishing (salmon trap fishermen), 1434. 

meat products, 1851, 1853. 

motor vehicle parts and accessories, 1531. 

motor vehicles, 1169. 

pulp and paper, 989, 994. 

radio sets and parts, 1728, 1729. 

rubber products, 1165, 1168. 

sawmill products, 1377, 1378' — planing 
mill, sash and door industry, 1382; 
wooden furniture industry, 1385. 1387. 
resolution adopted by C.C. of L., 1581. 



lxviii 



INDEX 



Vacations with Pay — Con. 

two weeks' vacation with pay for ail 
employees under government control, 
requested by T. and L.C., 496; remarks 
of Minister of Labour, 498; resolution 
adopted at convention of, 1574. 

Alita.: provisions of Holidays with Pay Order 
No. 5, under Labour Act, 1333; amend- 
ments to Holidays with Pay Order No. 
6, under Labour Act, 1682; application 
of order to all workers recommended 
by Federation of Labour, 259. 

B.C: amended provisions of Annual Holidays 
Act (1946), 1018. 

Man.: provisions of Vacations with Pay Act, 
1020, 1335; Winnipeg employees to 
close simultaneously for holidays, 917. 

Ont.: amendments in Hours of Work and 
Vacations with Pay Act, 841, 842; 
amendment in Act re flower, fruit and 
vegetable growers, 1186. 

Sask.: regulations under Annual Holidays Act 
(1944), 846; amendments in Act, 1493; 
amendments in Minimum Wage Act re 
pay for public holidays, 1492. 

United Kingdom: increase in number of pub- 
lic holidays with pay for farm workers 
in England and Wales, 1892; provisions 
of Holidays Order governing minimum 
rates and holidays for restaurant work- 
ers, 1346; agreement for public holidays 
with pay in building and civil engineer- 
ing contracting industries, 1414. 

U.S.A.: paid vacations and sick leave in 1945- 
46, 1602; advantages of plant-wide 
vacations in factories and shops, 920; 
provision of new agreement in coal 
mines, 1100; clothing workers receive 
simultaneous vacation period, 1100; one- 
year vacation with pay after ten years' 
service, granted by small manufacturing 
firm, 1758. 
See also Holidays. 

Vehicles : 

See Highways: Motor Vehicles; Trans- 
portation. 

Veterans : 

Canada — - 

review of manpower situation in 1946 
(with chart and tables), 648. 

obligation of veteran students in United 
States to return to Canada on gradua- 
tion, for employment, 771-72. 

progress under Veterans Rehabilitation Act, 
915. 

report (with tables) on use of rehabilitation 
aids, N.E.S. offices, and activities under 
Veterans' Land Act, 63, 64. 

tabular report on number of university 
student veterans receiving D.V.A. 
allowances, 65. 

provisions of Veterans Business and Pro- 
fessional Loans Act, 214-15. . 

Algoma Steel Corporation issues memoran- 
dum on reinstatement of war veterans, 
915. 

survey of professional openings — future 
employment opportunities for univer- 
sity-trained personnel, 1093. 

unemployment insurance contributions and 
benefits for veterans, 1812. 

amendment in Immigration Act re admit- 
tance of dependants, 1327. 

establishment and functions of inter-depart- 
mental advisory committee on veterans' 
dependants overseas, 559. 



Veterans : — Con. 

immigration of Polish veterans to work on 
farms, 628. 

training of discharged members of armed 
forces under C.V.T., 66, 67, 560, 1031-33, 
1189, 1477-78. 

allocation by C.V.T. of training-on-the-job 
opportunities as discovered by N.E.S., 
120. 

use made by veterans of C.V.T. plan, 1756. 

veterans urged to complete C.V.T., 915. 

results of New Brunswick survey on veter- 
ans' training plan for employment, 65. 

rehabilitation work of Citizens' Committees, 
386. 

training of women veterans — statement of 
Supervisor of Women's Training, C.V.T., 
at conference of Vocational Training 
Advisory Council, 856. 

re-establishment of ex-service women in 
western provinces, 384. 

assistance of Canadian Corps of Commis- 
sionaires in rehabilitation of older 
veterans. 630. 

assistance to vocational schools under Do- 
minion-provincial agreement, 1478. 

proceedings of conference of Vocational 
Training Advisory Council, 854. 

booklet on Vocational and P re-Matriculation 
Training of Canada's Veterans, issued 
by Department of Labour, 914. 

increased grants to veterans taking univer- 
sity or vocational training requested by 
C.C. of L., 500. 
U.S.A.: Courts rule on veterans' re-employ- 
ment rights, 493; veteran and civilian 
amputees organize for "self-help", 623; 
musical instruction as an aid in rehab- 
ilitation of veterans, 1250; full pro- 
tection for job rights of veterans by 
■C.I.O., 1776. 

See also Polish Veterans. 

Veterans Affairs, Department of: 

co-operation with Citizens' Committees, 386. 

issues statement on functions of Canadian 
Corps of Commissionaires, 630. 

transfer of training from C.V.T. to D.V.A. 
discussed at conference of Vocational 
Training Advisory Council, 1671; re- 
marks of Brigadier Lyon, Assistant 
Director, C.V.T., 1672. 

statements by officials at conference of 
Vocational Training Advisory Council, 
855. 

tabular report on number of university 
student veterans receiving D.V.A. 
allowance, 65. 

Veterans Business and Professional Loans 
Act: 

provisions, 214-15. 

Veterans Insurance: 

Canada — 

provisions of Act, 387. 

Veterans Land Act: 

provisions, 559. 

report (with table) on activities under Act 

during period October, 1945 to October 

1946, 64. 
applications for benefits under Act, 559. 
rehabilitation work of Citizens' Committees, 

386. 
amendments to Act recommended by C C. 

of L., 500, 1585. 



INDEX 



lxix 



Veterans Rehabilitation Act: 

progress under Act, 915. 

Vocational Education : 

N.S.— 

provisions of Vocational Education Act, 
1332; activities under Act in 1946, 1091. 
Ont.: amendments in Act, 842. 
Sask.: amendment in Vocational Education 
Act, 1493. 
See also Canadian Vocational Training; 
Vocational Training. 

Vocational Guidance : 

U.S.A.— 

policy of federal financial aid, 920. 

Vocational Schools: 

See Schools. 

Vocational Training: 

recruitment and training of workers in con- 
struction industry, recommended by 
Building, Civil Engineering and Public 
Works Committee of I.L.O., at meet- 
ing in Brussels, 143. 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Industrial 
Committee on Coal Mining. 1119. 

training facilities for textile workers recom- 
mended by Textiles Committee of 
I.L.O. , at meeting in Brussels, 141. 

recommendations of sub-committee adopted 
at meeting of I.L.O. committee on 
Petroleum, 315. 
Canada — 

re-organization of training centres, 1477. 

number of veterans receiving training under 
Veterans' Rehabilitation Act in 1946, 
915. 

enrolment of veterans in vocational training 
and pre-matriculation courses, 213, 558. 

assistance to vocational schools under 
Dominion-provincial agreement, 1478. 

functions of Citizens' Committees re train- 
ing of veterans, 386. 

booklet on Vocational and Pre-Matriculation 
Training of Canada's Veterans, issued 
by Department of Labour, 914. 

increased grants to veterans taking voca- 
tional training requested by C.C. of L., 
500. 
N.S.: provisions of Vocational Education Act, 

1332. 
LT.S.A.: vocational rehabilitation for civilians, 
561. 

See also Canadian Vocational Training; 
Vocational Education. 

Vocational Training Advisory Council: 

appointments, 212. 
eighth meeting. 854-57. 
conference, 1670. 

Voting : 

See Elections. 

Wages : 

recommendations of Building, Civil Engin- 
eering and Public Works Committee of 
I.L.O. at meeting in Brussels, 144. 

resolution of sub-committee adopted at 
meeting of I.L.O. Committee on 
Petroleum, 314. 



Wages — Con. 

resolution on guaranteed wage, fair wage 
and equal pay, adopted by Textiles 
Committee of I.L.O. at meeting held in 
Brussels, 140-41. 
Canada — 

wage rates in certain industries: — 
agricultural implements. 1532. 
brewery products, 994, 996. 
edible plant products — flour milling bread 
and cake baking, biscuit and confec- 
tionery manufacturing, 1854. 
electrical machinery and apparatus, 1722, 

1723, 1724. 
fishing, 1432, 1433, 1434, 1436, 1437, 1439, 

1442. 
lumber and lumber products — sawmill 
products, planing mill, sash and door, 
and wooden furniture, 1374. 
meat products, 1850. 

motor vehicle parts and accessories, 1532. 
motor vehicles, 1169. 
pulp and paper, 988. 
radio sets and parts, 1727, 1728. 
rubber products, 1164. 

increase in wage rate index in 1946, 771. 

index numbers (with table) of wage rates 
in Canada (1939-1946), 1590; (1939- 
1945), 130. 

wage ceilings for contributions under 
unemployment insurance contributions, 
69. 

report on national income and expenditure 
issued by D.B. of S., 1866. 

civilian salaries and wages, and military 
pay, (1938-1940) as shown in D.B. of 
S. report on national income, 311. 

labour income in Canada for period Jan- 
uary, 1946 to April, 1947, 1262; in 
June, 1947, 1528. 

report (with charts and tables) on post- 
Avar trend of real and money earnings 
in manufacturing, 949-53. 

wage rates in the construction and steam 
railway industries (1946), 890-92. 

annual review of employment and payrolls 
(1946), 1529. 

increase in farm wage rates, 912. 

text of award of Hon. Mr. Justice C. P. 
McTague in meat packing dispute, 1792. 

"open-end wage clanse", wage changes, holi- 
day pay, etc., provided under agree- 
ments in clothing and rubber indus- 
tries, 1411. 

pay basis of coal miners described in report 
of Royal Commission on Coal, 304, 306. 

decisions of N.W.L.B. re wage increases and 
income tax deductions, 6. 

provisions of Act respecting the Hudson 
Bav Mining and Smelting Company, 
1326. 

C.C. of L.— statement of wage policy, 630; 
legislative recommendations, 499; 
remarks of Pat Conroy, 501; of A. R. 
M©sher, 501; of Hon. Humphrey 
Mitchell, 501; urges adjustment of sub- 
standard wage schedules in government 
establishments, 1585; resolution on wage 
policy, 1581. 

resolution adopted at convention of T. and 
L.C., 1574. 



6384—6 



Izx 



INDEX 



Wages — Con. 

Alta.: provisions of new Labour Act govern- 
ing wage collection, 836, 843, 844; 
recommendation of Federation of 
Labour, 259. 

B.C.: new section under Semi-monthly Pay- 
ment of Wages Act (1939), 101®. 

N.S.: coal miners granted wage increase, 
1753; amendment in Nova Scotia Rail- 
way Act, 1332. 

Sask.: amendment in Workmen's Wage Act, 
1493. 

United Kingdom.: ratification of I.L.O. con- 
vention governing statistics of wages 
and hours of work, 1123; new wage 
scales for merchant seamen provided 
under agreements negotiated by 
National Maritime Board, 633; pro- 
visions of Wages Regulation Order gov- 
erning minimum rates for restaurant 
workers, 1346; appointment of Com- 
mission of Inquiry into wage structure 
of cotton weaving industry, 8. 

Switzerland: ratification of I.L.O. convention 
governing minimum wage fixing 
machinery, 1123. 

U.S.A.: PortaHo-Portal Pay Act signed by 
President Truman, 777; shipbuilding 
company required to pay for "portal" 
time, 921; claims for collection of 
portal-to-portal pay, 8; recommenda- 
tions of economic report delivered by 
President Truman to Congress, 512; 
earnings regain wartime peak, 635; 
high level of earnings, 921; final report 
on guaranteed wage plans, 281; trends 
in urban wage rates and their purchas- 
ing power during war and post-war 
periods, 8; federal-state cooperation in 
enforcement of labour laws, 1758; revi- 
sion of wage structures in steel and 
meat-packing industries, 283; agree- 
' ment reached between Western Electric 

Company and Association of Communi- 
cations Equipment Workers, 778; vio- 
lations of Fair Labour Standards Act 
and Public Contracts Act in 1946, 778; 
report on collective agreements pro- 
viding adjustments of wages to cost of 
living, 792; provisions of new collective 
agreements in coal mines, 1099-1100; 
agreements providing wage increases in 
manufacturing industry, 636; discharge 
provided for in incentive wage scheme 
for sheet metal workers, 1249; basic 
wage rate in steel industry up 131 per 
cent in 10' years, 921; wage increases to 
employees of Ford Motor Company, 
920; appointment of wage boards to 
recommend revision of minimum rates 
for women and minors in hotel, restaur- 
ant and laundry industries, in New 
York state, 11; high wages based on 
high productivity advocated by 
National Association of Manufacturers, 
10; recommendation of National Con- 
ference on Labour Legislation, 206; 
wages paid to employees in central co- 
operatives in 1945, 397; dissolution of 
N.W.L.B., and review of wartime 
activities concerning wages, 285. 

See also Dismissal Pay; Earnings; Guaran- 
teed Wage; Minimum Wages; "Strike 
Pay." 



Wagner Act (U.S.A.): 

changes in policy of N.L.R.B. re interpreta- 
tion of Act, 490. 

strike to enforce violation of Act ruled 
illegal by NJL.R.B., 284. 

labour relations program designed as basis 
for revision of Act, recommended by 
National Association of Manufacturers, 
10. 

Walsh-Healey Act (U.S.A.) : 

provisions, 1758. 

War Appropriation (United Nations 
Mutual Aid) Act, 1943: 

administration reviewed in final report of 
Canadian Mutual Aid Board, 490. 

Wartime Bureau of Technical Personnel: 

report on scientific and professional employ- 
ment in 1946-47, 710. 
See also Bureau of Technical Personnel. 

Wartime Community Centres : 

See Community Centres. 

Wartime Controls : 

Canada — 

legislative recommendation of C.C. of L., 

499. 
continuance of price controls urged by T. 
and L.C., 495. 

Wartime Labour Relations Board (Na- 
tional) : 

amendment to procedural regulations, 6. 

replacement by proposed Canada Labour 
Relations Board. 926, 938, 940. 

statistics re national and provincial boards 
during 1946, 124-25. 
Ont.: certification of foremen's union at 
Spruce Falls Power and Paper Com- 
pany, Limited, Kapuskasing, 277. 
Sask.: Labour Relations Board has no status 
to appeal question of jurisdiction — 
unregistered union lacks capacity to 
appear in Court, 203; order of Labour 
Relations Board quashed on ground of 
suspicion of bias, 705; annual report 
of Department of Labour (1946), 770. 

Wartime Labour Relations Regulations: 

consolidation and effective amendments 
issued by Department of Labour, 1408. 
amendment to procedural regulations of 
W.L.R.B. (National), 6. 

extension, 696. 

federal administration, 772. 

statement of Minister of Labour on labour 
relations legislation, 484. 

amendments to Regulations re wages and 
collective bargaining; consolidation of 
P.C. 4020; repeal of Schedule A (war 
industries), 132; text of amending 
order, P.C. 302, 133. 

application of regulations to transport and 
communication agencies, to war indus- 
tries and to other industries within 
provincial jurisdiction, 842. 

present position with respect to labour 
relations legislation — historical sum- 
mary of Regulations, 940. 

review of legislation enacted in 1944. 64'2. 



INDEX 



lxxi 



Wartime Labour Relations 
Regulations — Con. 
summary and text of Industrial Relations 
Bill No. 338 (Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act) designed 
to replace P.C. 1003, 923; hearings of 
House of Commons Industrial Rela- 
tions Committee, 1102-7. 
monthly reports of conciliation proceedings, 
41, 172, 333, 535, 666, 798, 959, 1136, 
1276, 1450, 1608, 1788. 
applications for certification, 31, 168, 325, 
534, 660, 793, 956, 1130, 1270, 1449, 
1607, 1782. 
Man.: enactment of legislation, 553; pro- 
visions of Acts to amend Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations Act, 1021. 
N.B.: enactment of legislation, 553; adminis- 
tration during 1946, 1894. 
N.S.: Court holds fishermen not employees — 

regulations not applicable, 381. 
Que.: adminisitration during 1945, 1685. 

Proceedings Under Wartime Labour Rela- 
tions Regulations: 

Abitibi Navigation Company, Limited, 
Toronto, and employees, 1134, 1273 
(application withdrawal) . 

Acadian Lines, Halifax, and employees, 535, 
799 (Board established). 

Acadian Lines' Limited (Wagner Tours 
Limited), Halifax, and employees, 536. 
799 (Board established), 1136 (report 
of Board,, minority report, and adden- 
dum to report). 

Alberta Wheat Pool, Vancouver, and 
employees (elevator department — 
retail, wholesale and department store 
union), 42, 524 (certification), 950, 
1609 (agreement reached). 

Alberta Wheat Pool, No. 1 Elevator, Van- 
couver, and employees (elevator 
department), 327, 660 (certification). 

Algoma Central Steamship Company, Sault 
Ste. Marie, and employees, 1134, 1273 
(application withdrawn). 

Aluminum Company of Canada, Limited, 
Arvida, aud employees, 327, 533 
(reasons for judgment). 

Aluminum Goods Limited, Toronto, and 
employees, 172, 334 (Board estab- 
lished), 537, 803-807 (report of Board). 

Amyot Lumber Company, Quebec, and 
employees 1 (freight handlers in harbour 
sheds), 327, 794 (application rejected). 

Anchor Cap and Closure Corporation of 
Canada, Toronto, and employees, 33. 

Anglo-Canadian Pulp and Paper Company, 
Quebec, and employees (freight hand- 
lers in harbour sheds — Quebec Harbour 
Workers' Union), 327, 793 (application 
rejected) . 

Anglo-Canadian Pulp and Paper Mills 
Limited, Quebec, and employees (long- 
shoremen, hatchmen — Quebec Long- 
shoremen's Union, Nos. 1 and 2), 525, 
661 (application withdrawn). 

Anglo-Canadian Pulp and Paper Mills, 
Limited, Quebec, and employees (long- 
shore m e n — Quebec Longshoremen's 
Union No. 1), 661. 958 (application 
rejected), 1135 (reasons for judgment). 

Anticosti Shipping Company, Montreal, and 
employees (on Fleuris — 'Canadian Nav- 
igators' Federation). 168 (certification). 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Anticosti Shipping Company, Montreal, and 
employees (on Fleuris — Canadian Sea- 
men's Union), 1450, 1607 (representa- 
tion vote), 1783 (certification). 

Archibald Coal Company, Limited, Halifax, 
and employees, 666, 799 (Board estab- 
lished), 1140 (report of Board). 

Arctic Ice Company, Limited, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 798, 1137 (agreement 
reached) . 

Arctic Radio Corporation (Station CFAR), 
Flin Flon, and employees, 959, 1132 
(representation vote), 1271 (certifica- 
tion) . 

Auger and Auger Lumber Company, Quebec, 
and employees (freight handlers in 
harbour sheds), 327, 793-94 (applica- 
tion rejected) . 

B.L.M. Line, Bridgewater, N.S., and em- 
ployees, 666, 960 (referred to provin- 
cial Minister of Labour). 

J. B. Baillargeon Express Limited, Montreal, 
and employees, 1608. 

Albert G. Baker, Quebec, and employees 
(freight handlers in harbour sheds), 
327, 794 (application rejected). 

Albert G. Baker, Limited, Quebec, and 
employees (longshoremen — Q u e b e c 
Longshoremen's Union No. I), 661, 958 
(application rejected), 1135 (reasons 
for judgment). 

Albert G. Baker, Limited, Quebec, and 
employees (longshoremen, hatchmen — 
Quebec Longshoremen's Union Nos. 1 
and 2), 525, 661 (application with- 
drawn ) . 

Bell Telephone Company of Canada (Eastern 
and Western areas), Montreal, and 
employees (Commercial Department), 
32 (certification). 

Bell Telephone Company of Canada (Eastern 
and Western areas), Montreal, and 
employees (engineers), 170, 794 (rep- 
resentation vote), 1131 (certification). 

John Bertram and Sons Company, Limited, 
Dundas, and employees (Pattern- 
makers' Association of Hamilton and 
vicinity), 41, 335, 669, 670 (report of 
Board and minority report). 

John Bertram and Sons Company, Limited, 
Dundas, and employees (International 
Association of Machinists), 42 (Board 
established), 173, 343-46 (report of 
Board and minority report) . 

Biltmore Hats Limited, Guelph, and 
employees, 535, 536 (agreement 
reached). 

Borden Company, Limited, Hamilton, and 
employees, 527 (reasons for judgment). 

Borden Company, Limited, Toronto, and 
employees (Spadina Crescent, Howard 
Park, Greenwood Avenue and North 
Toronto plants), 328, 534 (reasons for 
judgment). 

G. Bouchard, Quebec, and employees (freight 
handlers in harbour sheds), 327, 794 
(application rejected). 



lxxii 



INDEX 



Wartime Labour Relations 
Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Branch Lines Limited. Montreal, and 
employees (Canadian Seamen's Union) 
on tankers Pinebranch, Elmbranch and 
Spruceb ranch, 169 (application with- 
drawn) . 

Branch Lines Limited, Sorel, and employees 
(Canadian Navigators' Federation) on 
vessels Elmbranch, Firbranch, Pine- 
Branch and Sprucebranch, 1450. 

Branch Lines Limited, Sorel, and employees 
(Canadian Seamen's Union) on vessels 
Elmbranch, Oakbranch Firbranch, Pine- 
Branch and Sprucebranch, 1133, 1607 
(representation vote), 178© (certifica- 
tion). 

Brandon Woollen Mills Company, Limited, 
Brandon, and employees, 666, 799 
(Board established), 1140-43 (report 
of Board and supplementary report). 

Breithaupt Leather Company, Limited 
(Penetang Division), Penetanguishene, 
and employees, 172, 334 (Board estab- 
lished), 537. 

Britamerican Limited, Vancouver, and 
employees (marine engineers on ms 
Britamerican), 1134, 1271 (certifica- 
tion). 

British American Oil Company, Limited, 
Moose Jaw, and employees, 41 (agree- 
ment reached). 

British American Oil Company, Limited. 
Vancouver and New Westminster, and 
employees, 662, 796 (reasons for judg- 
ment). 

British American Oil Company, Limited 
(Britamerican Limited), Vancouver, 
and employees on vessel Britamerica, 
1450, 1607 (certification). 

British Columbia Coast and Lakes Barge 
and Ferry Service (C.N.R.), and 
employees (Canadian Merchant Service 
Guild), 1137, 1276 (Board estab- 
lished), 1451, 1628-33 (report of Board 
and minority report). 

British Columbia Coast and Lakes Barge and 
Ferry Service (C.N.R.) and employees 
(National Association of Marine 
Engineers of Canada, Inc.), 798, 960 
(Board established), 1138, 1457-60 
(report of Board and minority 
reports), 1610 (settlement reached). 

British Columbia Coast Service (C.N.R.) , 
and employees (National Association 
of Marine Engineers of Canada, Inc.), 
960 (Board established), 1138, 1457-60 
(report of Board and minority reports), 
1010 (settlement reached). 

British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 
(C.P.R.), and employees (Canadian 
Merchant Service Guild), 1137, 1276 
(Board established), 1451, 102S-33 
(report of Board and minority report). 

British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 
(C.P.R.), and employees (National 
Association of Marine Engineers of 
Canada, Inc.), 798, 900 (Board estab- 
lished), 1138, 1457-00 (report of Board 
and minority reports), 1610 (settle- 
ment reached). 



Wartime Labour Relations 
Regulations : — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations: — Con. 

British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 
(C.P.R.), and employees (Seafarers' 
International Union of North America), 
1276, 1451 (Board established), 1009. 

British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 
(C.P.R.), Victoria, and employees, 326 
(representation vote), 601 (certifica- 
tion). 

British Columbia Distillery Company, Limited, 
New Westminster, and employees, 605 
(reasons for judgment). 

British Columbia Lake and River Service 
(C.P.R.), and employees, 520, 795 
(representation vote), 957 (certifica- 
tion). 

British Columbia Motor Transportation 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees, 41 
(agreement reached). 

British Overseas Airways Corporation, Dor- 
val, and employees (stores depart- 
ment), 42, 326, 531 (reasons for judg- 
ment). 

Broulan Porcupine Mines Limited, Pamour, 
Ont., and employees, 535, 607 (Board 
established), 800, 1010-12 (report of 
Board and minority report). 

Brown Boggs Foundry and Machine Company, 
Limited. Hamilton, and employees, 41, 
335, 669, 671 (report of Board). 

Buffalo Ankerite Gold Mines Limited, South 
Porcupine, and employees, 535, 536 
(Board established), 800, 1012-14 
(report of Board and minority report). 

Bulman Bros. Limited, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 060, 1137 (referred to pro- 
vincial Minister of Labour). 

P. Burns and Company, Limited; Canada 
Coal Limited; Conger Lehigh Coal 
Company, Limited; Cosgrove and Com- 
pany, Limited; Dibble Coal Company, 
Limited; Dominion Coal and Wood, 
Limited; The Elias Roger Company, 
Limited; Empire Hanna Coal Com- 
pany, Limited; Milnes Coal Company, 
Limited; Standard Fuels Limited; 
Toronto Fuels, Limited; and the F. P. 
Weaver Coal Company, Limited, 
Toronto, and employees, 328, 533 
(reasons for judgment). 

Canada China Clay and Silica Limited, Kuril, 
Que., and employees, 529 (reasons for 
judgment). 

Canada Coach Lines Limited, Hamilton, and 
employees, 661, 795 (representation 
vote), 1132 (application rejected). 

Canada Cycle and Motor Company, Limited, 
Weston, and employees, 535, 607 
(Board established), 800, 1010 (strike 
after award), 1014-22 (report of 
Board and minority report). 

Canada Glue Company, Limited, Brantford, 
and employees, 333, 334 (Board estab- 
lished), 537, 609, 071 (report of 
Board). 

Canada Steamship Lines, Limited, Montreal, 
and employees (Canadian Lake Sea- 
men's Union), 1134, 1450 (application 
withdrawn). 



INDEX 



lxxiii 



Wartime Labour Relations 
Regulations :- — Con . 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Canada Steamship Lines, Limited, Montreal, 
and employees (Canadian Seamen's 
Union), 1133, 1135, 1272 (application 
withdrawn), 1274 (reasons for judg- 
ment) . 

Canada Steamship Lines, Limited, and 
employees (waterfront freight handlers 
at various points in Quebec and 
Ontario), 1451 (Board established), 
1600. 

Canada Veneers Limited, Saint John, and 
employees. 666, 709 (Board estab- 
lished), 960, 1452-56 (report of chair- 
man and members' reports). 

Canadian Air Express Limited, and ground 
crew personnel at Dorval and Ottawa, 
958, 959, 1271 (certification), 1608, 
1789 (Board established). 

Canadian Bank Note Company, Limited, 
Ottawa, and employees, 528 (reasons 
for judgment). 

Canadian Dredge and Dock Company, 
Toronto, and employees (marine 
engineers), 1608, 1783 (representation 
vote) . 

Canadian Furnace Limited, Port Colborne, 
and employees, 535, 536 (Board estab- 
lished), 670 (settlement reached, Board 
cancelled). 

•Canadian Gypsum Company, Limited, Hills- 
borough, N.B., and employees, 662, 797 
(reasons for judgment). 

Canadian Gypsum Company, Limited. Wind- 
sor, and employees, 169 (application 
withdrawn) . 

Canadian Import Company, Quebec, and 
employees (freight handlers in harbour 
sheds), 327, 793 (application rejected). 

Canadian Import Company, Quebec, and 
employees (longshoremen, hatchmen — 
Quebec Longshoremen's Union Nos. 1 
■and 2), 525, 661 (application with- 
drawn) . 

Canadian Import Company, Quebec, and 
employees (longshoremen — Quebec 
Longshoremen's Union No. 1), 661, 958 
(application rejected), 1135 (reasons 
for judgment). 

Canadian Industries Limited (Copper Cliff 
Works, General Chemicals Division), 
Copper Cliff, and employees, 176 (report 
of Board). 

Canadian Industries Limited (Nylon Divi- 
sion), Kingston, and employees, 662. 

Canadian Industries Limited, Nobel, and 
employees, 333, 536 (Board estab- 
lished), 668, 1143 (report of Board). 

Canadian Line Materials, Limited, Scarboro 
Junction, and employees, 42 (agree- 
ment reached). 

Canadian National Railways and employees 
(sleeping, dining and parlour car 
department), 1136, 1137 (Board estab- 
lished), 1276, 1622-28 (report of 
Board and minority report). 

Canadian National Railways, Moncton, and 
employees (Purchasing Department), 
795-96, 957 (certification). 



Wartime Labour Relations 
Regulations : — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Canadian National Railways, Montreal, and 
employees (freight handlers on Mont- 
real wharf), 798, 960 (Board estab- 
lished), 1>137, 1277-83 (report of Board 
and minority report). 

Canadian National Railways, Montreal, and 
employees (of general freight claim 
agent and district freight claim agent), 
794 (application withdrawn), 795. 

Canadian National Railways (Central 
Station), Montreal, and employees 
restaurant), 1608, 1783 (certification). 

Canadian National Railways, Quebec and 
employees (freight handlers in harbour 
sheds), 327, 793 (application rejected). 

Canadian National Railways, Winnipeg, and 
employees (clerical office staff of 
general superintendent of motive power 
and car equipment), 42, 169 (certi- 
fication) . 

Canadian National Railways, Winnipeg, and 
employees (WI Railway Telegraph 
office), 958, 1131 (certification). 

Canadian National Railways and Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company, their sub- 
sidiaries and jointly-owned undertakings 
and Algoma Central and Hudson Bay 
Railway Company, Ontario Northland 
Railway, Toronto, Hamilton and 
Buffalo Railway Company, Pacific 
Great Eastern Railway Company, 
Essex Terminal Railway Company, and 
Sydney and Louisburg Railway Com- 
pany, and employees (Brotherhood of 
Railroad Trainmen), 960 (Board estab- 
lished), 1451. 

Canadian National Railways, Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company, Dominion 
Atlantic Railway, Esquimalt and Nan- 
aimo Railway, Quebec Central Railway, 
Northern Alberta Railways Company, 
Ontario Northland Transportation 
Commission, and Toronto, Hamilton 
and Buffalo Railway Company, and 
employees (Railway Association of 
Canada), 526, 957 (certification). 

Canadian National Railways and Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company and sub- 
sidaries, and Pacific Great Eastern 
Railway, Algoma Cental and Hudson 
Bay Railway, Toronto, Hamilton and 
Buffalo Railway, Ontario Northland 
Railway, Sydney and Louisburg Rail- 
way, and Essex Terminal Railway, and 
employees. 666. 667 (Board estab- 
lished), 800, 960, 961-63 (report of 
Board), 1610 (settlement reached). 

Canadian National Railways: 
See also 

British Columbia Coast and Lakes Barge 

and Ferry Service. 
British Columbia Coast Service. 
Charlottetown Hotel. 
Ontario Car Ferry Company, Limited. 
Oshawa Railway Company. 
Prince Arthur Hotel. 

Canadian National Steamers (Niagara. St. 
Catharines and Toronto Railway Com- 
pany), and employees (engineering 
officers). 959, 1131 (certification). 



Ixxiv 



INDEX 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations :—Con. 

Canadian National Steamships,. Quebec, and 
employees (longshoremen, hatchmen — ■ 
Quebec Longshoremen's Union, Nos. 1 
and 2), 525, 661 (application with- 
drawn) . 

Canadian National Steamships (Pacific), and 
employees (Canadian Merchant Service 
Guild), 1137, 1276 (Board established), 
1451. 1628-33 (report of Board and 
minority report). 

Canadian National Steamships (Pacific), and 
employees (Seafarers' International 
Union of North America), 1276, 1451 
(Board established), 1609. 

Canadian National Steamships; Canadian 
Pacific Steamships Limited; Cunard 
White Star Limited; Manchester Liners 
Limited; Ocean Dominion Steamship 
Corporation; County Line Limited; 
Canadian Import Company Limited; 
Robert Reford Company Limited; 
Paquet and Sons Limited; Anglo-Cana- 
dian Pulp and Paper Mills Limited; 
William G. McCauley and Albert G. 
Baker Limited, and employees, 525, 
661 (application withdrawn). 
. Canadian National Telegraph Audit Depart- 
ment, Toronto, and employees, 959, 1272 
(application rejected). 

Canadian National Telegraphs, Toronto, and 
employees (engineering department), 
31 (certification). 

Canadian Ohio Brass Company, Limited, 
Niagara Falls, and employees, 41, 334 
(agreement reached). 

Canadian Oil Company, Limited, Toronto 
(Shipping Limited, Montreal), and 
employees, 795, 1272 (application with- 
drawn) . 

Canadian Pacific Airlines, Montreal, and 
employees, 33 (application rejected), 
37 (reasons for judgment) . 

Canadian Pacific Airlines, Winnipeg, and 
employees (clerical staff, Edmonton), 
525, 1132 (application withdrawn). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and 
employees (communications depart- 
ment), 798, 969 (Board established), 
1137. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and 
employees (dining, cafe and buffet car 
employees), 798, 1137 (Board estab- 
lished), 1451. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company ,and 
employees (freight handlers on Mont- 
real wharf), 798, 960 (Board estab- 
lished), 1137, 1277-83 (report of Board 
and minority report). 

Canadian Pacific Railway, and employees 
(road train conductors on western 
lines), 168 (certification). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Britt, 
and employees (coal dock employees), 
1451. 1609 (agreement reached). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Little 
Crescent, and employees (coal dock 
employees), 1451, 1699 (agreement 
reached). 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Medicine 
Hat, and employees (superintendent's 
office), 32 (certification). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Bay of 
Fundy Service), Montreal, and em- 
ployees (engineers on Princess Helene), 
525, 794 (representation vote), 956 
(certification). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Mont- 
real, and employees (railway con- 
ductors, Eastern Lines), 169 (applica- 
tion rejected). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Montreal, 
and employees (railway conductors, 
Western Lines), 169 (application 
rejected). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Moose 
Jaw, and employees (clerks in super- 
intendent's office), 1450, 1783 (applica- 
tion withdrawn). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Nelson, 
B.C., and employees (superintendent's 
office), 31 (certification). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Quebec, 
and employees (freight handlers in 
harbour sheds), 327, 794 (application 
withdrawn). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and 
employees (red cap porters) in Quebec 
district at Montreal Windsor Station, 
Montreal West Station, Place Viger 
Station, Park Avenue Station, West- 
mount Station, Trois Rivieres Station 
and Quebec Palais Station, 1273, 1607. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Revel- 
stoke, and employees (clerks in super- 
intendent's office), 169 (representation 
vote), 326 (certification). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Van- 
couver Station, and employees (red 
cap porters), 1134, 1272 (certification), 
1449 (application rejected). 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Limited, 
Winnipeg, Weston and Brandon, and 
Fort William and Kenora, and 
employees (clerks, etc., general accoun- 
tant's office), 526, 795 (representation 
vote), 957 (certification). 

Canadian Pacific Railway: 
See also 

British Columbia Coast Steamship 

Service. 
British Columbia Lake and River Service. 
Chateau Frontenac Hotel. 
Cornwallis Inn. 

Canadian Pacific Steamships, Quebec, and 
employees (longshoremen, hatchmen), 
525, 661 (application withdrawn). 

Canadian Stevedoring Company, Vancouver, 
and employees (deepsea longshoremen 
at ports of Chemainus, Orofton, Nan- 
aimo and Ladysmith), 958, 1132 (rep- 
resentation vote). 1271 (certification). 

Canadian Transport Company, Vancouver, 
and employees (on tanker Brit- 
american). 959. 1132 (representation 
vote), 1272 (application rejected). 



INDEX 



Ixxv 



Wartime Labour Relations 
Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Canadian Vickers Limited, Montreal, and 
employees, 172, 334 (Board established). 
537, 669, 673-76 < report of Board and 
minority report), \1$% (settlement 
reached) . 

Caribbean Steamship Company, Montreal, and 
employees (on North Coaster) 662, 796, 
957 (representation vote), 1131 (certi- 
fication), 1272 (application rejected). 

Central Broadcasting Corporation, Limited, 
Prince Albert, and employees, 325 
(certification) . 

Central Station (Canadian National Rail- 
ways), Montreal, and employees (res- 
taurant), 1608. 

J. Georges Chalifour, Quebec, and employees 
(freight handlers in harbour sheds), 
327, 794 (application rejected). 

Charlevoix-Saguenay Navigation Company, 
Limited, Montreal, and employees (on 
Jacques C artier) , 796, 1132 (applica- 
tion withdrawn). 

Charlottetown Hotel (C.N.R.), Charlotte- 
town, and employees, 32 (certification). 

Chateau Frontenac Hotel (C.P.R.), Quebec, 
and employees (beverage department), 
1608. 

Chestnut Canoe Company, Limited, Freder- 
icton, and employees, 334 (Board estab- 
lished), 537, 677 (report of Board). 

Chromium Mining and Smelting Corporation 
Limited, Sault Ste. Marie, and 
employees, 334, 536 (Board established), 
668, 808 (report of Board). 

City Dray Company, Winnipeg, and employees, 
535, 668 (Board established), 800, 
1144-47 (report of Board). 

City Laundry Limited, Saint John, and 
employees, 666, 960 (agreement 
reached). 

City of Winnipeg, and employees, 334, 335 
(Board established), 669, 1464 (report 
of Board). 

City of Winnipeg Hydro-Electric System, and 
employees, 329 (reasons for judgment). 

Claratel Cafe, Winnipeg, and employees, 170, 
331 (reasons for judgment), 334 (Board 
established), 335, 669, 679 (report of 
Board). 

Clarke Steamship Company, Limited. Mont- 
real, and employees (Canadian Sea- 
men's Union), 798, 1451 (agreement 
reached). 

Clarke Steamship Company, Limited, Mont- 
real, and employeees (on North 
Coaster), 661. 

Clarke Steamship Company, Limited, Mont- 
real, and employees (on North Voyager, 
North Gaspe, and North Shore), 661, 
957 (representation vote). 

Clarke Steamship Company, Limited, Quebec, 
and employees (freight handlers in har- 
bour sheds), 327, 793 (application 
rejected). 

Coal Carriers Corporation Limited, Brock- 
ville, and employees (Canadian Sea- 
men's Union), 1134, 1273 (application 
withdrawn). 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Coal Carriers Corporation Limited, Brock- 
ville, and employees (on Coalfax) 
(National Association of Marine 
Engineers of Canada, Inc.), 1134, 1271 
(certification). 

Coal Valley Mining Company, Limited, Coal 
Valley, and employees, 170, 660 (certi- 
fication). 

Coastal Towing Company, Limited, Van- 
couver, and certain employees, 168 
(certification). 

Colonial Steamships Limited, Sarnia, and 
employees, 1134, 1135, 1274 (reasons 
for judgment) . 

Con Mines, Yellowknife, N.W.T., and 
employees (datal), 42. 

Coniaurum Mines Limited, Schumacher, and 
employees, 535, 668 (Board estab- 
lished), 800, 1634-36 (report of Board 
and minority report). 

Consolidated Dredging Company, Limited, 
Fort William, and employees (on 
Edward C. Whelan and Lugar) , 1134, 
1449 (certification). 

Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company 
of Canada, Limited, Yellowknife, 
N.W.T., and employees, 524 (certifica- 
tion), 666, 667 (agreement reached). 

Continental Can Company of Canada, 
Limited, (Plant 90), Toronto, and 
employees, 535, 536 (Board estab- 
lished), 668. 

Cornwallis Inn (C.P.R.), Kentville, and 
employees, 32 (certification). 

Corporation of the Village of Forest Hill, 
and employees, 33 (reasons for judg- 
ment). 

County Line Limited, Quebec ,and employees 
(longshoremen, hatchmen), 525, 661 
(application withdrawn). 

Crescent Creamery Limited, City Dairy 
Limited, Modern Dairies Limited, St. 
Boniface Creamery, Limited, and 
Central Dairies Limited, Winnipeg, 
and employees, 667, 960 (agreement 
reached). 

Cub Aircraft Corporation Limited, Hamilton, 
and employees^, 170, 333 (reasons for 
judgment). 

S. Cunard and Company, Limited, Halifax, 
and employees, 667, 799 (Board estab- 
lished), 800^01, 1147 (report of Board). 

Cunard White Star Limited, and employees,. 
525, 661 (application withdrawn). 

Davie Shipbuilding and Repairing Company, 
Limited, Lauzon, and employees (on 
Busyoee, Chateau and Manoir — Cana- 
dian Seamen's Union), 661, 1131 
(application rejected). 

Davie Shipbuilding and Repairing Company, 
Limited, Lauzon, and employees (on 
Busyoee, Chateau and Manoir — Cana- 
dian Union of Boilermakers and Iron 
Shipbuilders), 959, 1132, 1133 (applica- 
tion withdrawn) . 

Davie Transportation Company, Limited, 
Lauzon, Levis, Que., and employees (on 
A.C.D., O.D.D., and G.T.D.), 1273, 1608 
(application rejected). 



lxxvi 



INDEX 



Wartime Labour Relations 
Regulations — Con. 

Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Delnite Mines Limited, Timmins, and 
employees, 535, 536 (Board established) . 
801, 1636-38 (report of Board and 
minority report). 

Francis Dinn, Quebec, and employees (freight 
handlers in harbour sheds), 327, 794 
(application rejected). 

Dominion Electric Protection Company, 
Toronto, and employees, 358 (report of 
I.D.I.C.). 

Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation 
Limited, Sydney, and employees, 170, 
332 (reasons for judgment). 

Dominion Wheel and Foundries Limited, St. 
Boniface, and employees, 708, 960 
(agreement reached). 

Dorval Airport 

See Canadian Air Express. 

Driftwood Lands and Timber Limited, Sault 
Ste. Marie, .and employees, 795, 1132 
(application withdrawn). 

Drumheller Coal Operators' Association, 
Drumheller, and employees, 172, 536 
(agreement reached). 

John Duff and Sons, Limited, Hamilton, and 
employees, 42, 173, 669, 679 (repor,t 
of Board) . 

Eleven painting contractors, Saint John, 
N.B., and employees, 667, 799 (agree- 
ment reached). 

Empire Stevedoring Company, Vancouver, 
-and employees (deepsea longshoremen 
at Ports of Chemainus, Crofton, 
Nanaimo and Ladysmith), 958, 1132 
(representation vote), 1271 (certifica- 
tion) . 

Fairfield and Sons Limited (St. James plant), 
Winnipeg, and employees, 667, 799 
(Board established), 801, 1284 (report 
of Board). 

Familoil Steamship Company, Limited, Mont- 
real, and employees (Maxwell Park), 
959, 1271 (certification). 

Famous Players Canadian Corporation 
Limited, British Columbia, and 
employees, 535, 536 (Board estab- 
lished), 537, 669, 680 (report of Board 
and minority report). 

Forsberg, Finney and Swanson, Con Mine, 
Yellowknife, N.W.T., 326 (certifica- 
tion ) . 

Foundation Maritime Limited. Halifax, and 
employees, 1133, 1783 (application 
withdrawn). 

Gayport Shipping Limited, Toronto, and 
employees (on Britamoil, Britamolene, 
Britamoco, and Britamette) , 32 (certi- 
fication) . 

Gelling Engineering Limited, Welland, and 
employees, 42, 538 (report of Board). 

General Stevedoring. Quebec, and employees 
(freight handlers in harbour sheds), 
327, 794 (application rejected). 

Giant Yellowknife Gold Mines, Limited, 
Yellowknife, N.W.T., and employees, 
42, 524 (certification), 798, 960 (agree- 
ment reached). 

Glass Bottle Blowers Association of the 
United States and Canada, 33. 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Great Lakes Lumber and Shipping Limited, 
Fort William, and employees, 1134, 
1273 (application withdrawn). 

Great West Saddlery Company, Limited, 
Winnipeg, and employees, 41, 536 
(agreement reached). 

Joseph Grenier, Quebec, and employees 
(freight handlers in harbour sheds), 
327, 794 (application rejected). 

Grimsby Stove and Furnace Company, 
Grimsby, and employees, 172, 60S 
(Board established), 801. 1287 (report 
of Board). 

Grosch Felt Shoe Company. Stratford, and 
employees, 172, 334 (agreement 
reached). 

Grosvenor Hotel, Limited, Vancouver, and 
employees, 662. 

Gulf Ports Steamship Company, Limited, 
Montreal, and employees (on Gulf 
Port), 795, 796, 958 (representation 
vote), 1131 (certification). 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Limited, Toronto, 
and employees, 334 (agreement 
reached). 

Halifax Shipyards Limited (Halifax and 
Dartmouth plants), and employees, 41, 
172 (agreement reached). 

Hansen Lumber Company, Limited, Quebec, 
and employees (freight handlers in har- 
bour sheds), 327, 793 (application 
rejected). 

Hindman Transportation Company, Limited, 
Owen Sound, and employees, 1133, 1273 
(application withdrawn). 

Hollingcr Consolidated Gold Mines Limited. 
Timmins. and employees, 535, 536 
(Board established), 801, 1638-41 
(report of Board and minority reports) . 
• Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting Company, 
Limited, Flin Flon, and employees 
(research department), 1133, 1449 
(certification). 

Hull City Transport Limited, Hull, and 
employees (drivers, garage workers, 
and office workers), 959, 1132 (repre- 
sentation vote), 1271 (certification). 

Hull City Transport Limited. Hull, and 
employees (bus drivers and garage 
employees), 958, 959 (application with- 
drawn), 1132 (representation vote), 
1135, 1272 (application rejected), 1275 
(reasons for judgment). 

Huxley Cartage Company, Limited, Winnipeg, 
and employees, 172. 1276. 

Imperial Optical Company. Toronto, and 
employees, 172, 335. 

Insulation Products Limited, Toronto, and 
employees, 173 (Board established), 
335, 538-39 (report of Board). 

Inter-Island Steamship Company, Limited. 
Montreal, and employees (on Island 
Connector — Canadian Navigators' Fed- 
eration). 796, 1131 (certification). 

Inter-Island Steamship Company, Limited. 
Montreal, and employees (Canadian 
Seamen's Uiiion), 661. 957 (representa- 
tion vote), 1272 (application rejected). 



INDEX 



lxxvii 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Inter-Island Steamship Company, Limited, 
Montreal, and employees (on Island 
Connector — Canadian Association of 
Maritime Transport Workers), 957 
(representation vote). 

International Fertilizer Company, Quebec, 
and employees (freight handlers in 
harbour sheds), 327, 793 (application 
rejected). 

International Harvester Company of Canada, 
Limited, Hamilton, and employees, 663 
(reasons for judgment). 

Thos. Jackson and Sons, Limited, Winnipeg, 
and employees, 667, 1137 (agreement 
reached) . 

Kent Lines Limited, Saint John, and 
employees (on Rexton Kent), 959, 1271 
(certification). 

Keystone Transports Limited, Montreal, and 
employees, 41, 172 (agreement 
reached) . 

Kingsway Transport Limited, Montreal, and 
employees, 169 (application rejected), 
795, 1131 (certification). 

Lake Erie Navigation Company, Limited, 
Walkerville, and employees, 1134, 1273 
(application withdrawn). 

Lakehead Terminal Elevators Association, 
Fort William and Port Arthur, and 
employees, 667, 1276 (agreement 
reached) . 

Lakeland Tankers, Limited, Toronto,, and 
employees (on Makaiceli), 1133, 1449 
(representation vote), 1607 (applica- 
tion rejected). 

Lakeshore Mines Limited, Kirkland Lake, 
and employees, 42 (Board established), 
173, 80847 (report of Board and min- 
ority report) . 

Link^Belt Limited, Toronto, and employees, 
349-52 (report of Board and minority 
report) . 

Lloyd Tankers, Limited, Toronto, and 
employees (on Bruce Hudson and Joan 
Virginia — National Association of Mar- 
ine Engineers of Canada, Inc.), 1134, 
1450 (representation vote). 

Lloyd Tankers Limited, Toronto, and 
employees (Canadian Seamen's Union), 
1134, 1273 (application withdrawn). 

Lockeport Company Division (National Sea 
Products Limited), Lockeport, and 
employees, 40 (reasons for judgment) . 

Lounsbury Company, Limited, Moncton, and 
employees, 822 (report of I.D.I.C.). 

Lower St. Lawrence Transport Company, 
Limited, and employees on Rimouski, 
Jean Brillant, and Metane — Canadian 
Association of Maritime Transport 
Workers), 31 (certification). 

Lower St. Lawrence Transport Company, 
Limited, Rimouski, and employees (on 
Jean Brillant, Metane, and Rimouski 
— Canadian Seamen's Union), 959, 1133 
(application withdrawn). 

!Macassa Mines Limited, Kirkland Lake, and 
employees, 535, 536 (Board estab- 
lished), 801, 1641-43 (report of Board 
and minority reports) . 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Mackenzie, White and Dunsmuir, Limited, and 
employees, 328, 532 (reasons for judg- 
ment). 

Magazine Digest Publishing Company, 
Limited, Toronto, and employees, 172, 
667 (agreement reached). 

Magdalen Islands Transportation Company, 
Limited, Montreal, and employees (on 
Magdalen), 795, 796, 958 (representa- 
tion vote), 1131 (certification). 

Malartic Gold Fields, Limited, Malartic, and 
employees, 336 (report of Board and 
minority report). 

Manchester Liners Limited, and employees, 
525, 661 (application withdrawn). 

Manitoba Cartage and Storage Limited, Win- 
nipeg, and employees, 334, 668 (Board 
established), 801, 1148 (report of 
Board and minority report). 

Marine Industries Limited, Sorel, and 
employees, 39 (reasons for judgment). 

Maritime Towing and Salvage Limited, Hali- 
fax, and employees, 1133, 1783 (appli- 
cation withdrawn). 

Massey-Harris Company, Limited (Toronto 
and Brantford plants), and employees, 
355 (report of Board). 

William G. McCauley, Quebec, and employees 
(freight handlers in harbour sheds), 
327, 794 (application rejected). 

William G. McCauley, Quebec, and employees 
(longshoremen, hatchmen), 525, 661 
(application withdrawn). 

McColl-Frontenac Oil Company, Limited, 
Toronto, and employees (on Gyclo 
Brave, Cyclo Chief and Cyclo Warrior), 
1273 (application withdrawn). 

McCurdy Supply Company, Limited, Win- 
nipeg, and employees, 667, 1137 (agree- 
ment reached). 

Mclntyre and Taylor Limited, Toronto, and 
employees, 535, 668 (Board estab- 
lished), 801, 963-64 (report of Board). 

Mclntyre Porcupine Mines Limited, Schu- 
macher, and employees, 535, 536 (Board 
established), 801, 1643-45 (report of 
Board and minority report). 

McLeod River Hard Coal Company (1941) 
Limited, Mercoal, and employees (fire- 
bosses'), 32 (certification). 

Roland McMillan (C.P.R. coal contractor), 
Winnipeg, and employees, 33 (repre- 
sentation vote), 326 (certification). 

McNeil Transport Limited, Montreal, and 
employees, 169 (application with- 
drawn) . 

Midland Railway Company of Manitoba, 
Winnipeg, and employees (section fore- 
man, sectionman, and extra gang 
labourer — Brotherhood of Maintenance- 
of-Way Employees), 525»26, 661 (certi- 
fication). 

Midland Railway Company of Manitoba, Win- 
nipeg, and employees (roundhouse and 
shop employees 1 — Brotherhood of Rail- 
way Carmen), 795, 957 (certification). 



Ixxviii 



INDEX 



Wartime Labour Relations 
Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Midland Railway Company of Manitoba, 
Winnipeg, and employees (Brotherhood 
of railway and steamship clerks, 
freight handlers, express and station 
employees), 169 (representation vote), 
326 (certification). 

Modern City Dairy, Sydney, and employees, 
41, 799 (agreement reached). 

Municipality of St. Clements, Manitoba, and 
employees, 334 (agreement reached). 

J. S. Nairn, Sydney, and employees, 798, 
1137 (agreement reached). 

National Cartage and Storage Limited, Win- 
nipeg, and employees, 334, 668 (Board 
established), 802, 1151-54 (report of 
Board and minority report). 

National Harbours Board, Montreal, and 
employees (engineers — Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers), 957 (certifica- 
tion), 958. 

National Harbours Board, Port of Montreal, 
and employees (on Sir Hugh Allan, 
Glenkeen and Glenada — Canadian Mer- 
chant Service Guild), 1450. 

National Harbours Board, Montreal, and 
employees (officers on Sir Hugh Allan, 
Glenkeen and Glenada — Canadian Nav- 
vigators' Federation), 1450. 

National Harbours Board, Montreal, and 
employees (marine engineers on Sir 
Hugh Allan, Glenkeen and Glenada — 
National Association of Marine Engin- 
eers of Canada, Inc.), 1450. 

National Harbours Board, Montreal, and 
employees 1 (toll collectors at Jacques 
Cartier Bridge), 168 (certification). 

National Harbours Board (grain elevators at 
Montreal and Quebec, and cold storage 
plant at Montreal), and employees, 667, 
1137 (agreement reached). 

National Harbours Board, Montreal, and 
employees (Canadian Brotherhood of 
Railway Employees and Other Trans- 
port Workers), 33 (application with- 
drawn). 

National Harbours Board, Port of Montreal, 
Montreal, and employees (yard fore- 
men and yardmen), 525, 793 (certifi- 
cation). 

National Harbours Board, Montreal, and 
employees (Terminal Railway Depart- 
ment, Port of Montreal), 327, 525 
(certification) . 

National Harbours Board, Port Colborne, and 
employees, 168 (certification). 

National Harbours Board, Quebec, and 
employees (office clerks), 327, 794 
* (application rejected) . 

National Harbours Board, Vancouver, and 
employees (yard masters, yard foremen 
and yardmen — 'Brotherhood of Railroad 
Trainmen), 525, 600 (certification), 
1137. 

National Light and Power Company, Moose 
Jaw, and employees, 172, 334 (Board 
established), 537, 609, 681 (report of 
Board). 

National Sand and Material Company, 
Limited, Toronto, and employees, 1133. 
1273 (application withdrawn). 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations: — Con. 

National Sea Products Limited, Lockeport, 
and employees (Lockeport Company 
Division), 40 (reasons for judgment). 

National Sea Products Limited (Maritime 
Fish Division), Halifax, and employees, 
334, 668 (Board established), 818 
(report of Board). 

Newfoundland Railway, St. John's, and 
employees (clerical staff) North 
Sydney, N.S., 525, 793 (certification), 
1009, 1789 (agreement reached). 

Niagara Falls General Hospital, Niagara 
Falls, and employees, 822 (appoint- 
ment of I.D.I.C.). 

Niagara, St. Catharines and Toronto 
Railway Company (Canadian National 
Steamers), and employees (engineering 
officers), 959, 1131 (certification). 

Noranda Mines, Limited, Noranda, and 
employees, 181 (strike after Concilia- 
tion Board procedure), 357. 

Norman's Transfer Limited, Cornwall, and 
employees, 169 (application with- 
drawn). 

North American Transport Company, Limited, 
Montreal, and employees (on Huas- 
caran), 1134, 1272 (application 
rejected). 

North Pioneer Steamships Company, Limited, 
Montreal, and employees (on North 
. Pioneer), 795, 796, 958 (representation 
vote), 1131 (certification). 

North Star Oil Company, Limited, Winnipeg, 
and employees, 799, 1276. 

Northern Alberta Railway, Edmonton, and 
employees, 1783. 

Northern Construction Company, and J. W. 
Stewart, Limited, Yellowknife, N.W.T., 
and employees, 1134, 1607-8 (applica- 
tion rejected). 

Northern Electric Company, Limited, 
Toronto, and employees, 35 (reasons 
for judgment), 535, 668 (Board estab- 
lished), 802, 1288-92 (report of Board 
and minority report). 

Northland Coal and Ice Company, Limited, 
Winnipeg, and employees, 334, 335 
(Board established), 537-38, 818-19 
(report of Board). 

Northumberland Ferries Limited, Charlotte- 
town, and employees, 1134, 1607 (rep- 
resentation vote), 1783 (certification). 

Northwest Steamships Limited, Toronto, and 
employees, 1133, 1273 (application 
withdrawn) . 

Norton-Palmer Hotel, Windsor, and em- 
ployees, 822 (report of I.D.I.C.). 

Ocean Dominion Steamship Corporation, and 
employees, 525, 661 (application with- 
drawn). 

Olympia Wholesale, Brandon, and employees, 
607. 799 (agreement reached). 

Ontario Oar Ferry Company, Limited 
(C.N.R.), Montreal, and employees (on 
Ontario. No. 1 and Ontario No. 2), 
1273, 1449 (certification). 



INDEX 



lxxix 



Wartime Labour Relations 
R e gala tions — Con . 

Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Ontario Northland Transportation Commis- 
sion, North Bay, and employees (bag- 
gagemen, brakemen, yardmen, and yard 
foremen — Canadian Association of Rail- 
waymen), 525, 661 (representation 
vote), 958 (application rejected). 

Ontario Northland Transportation Commis- 
sion, North Bay, and employees (brake- 
men, baggagemen, yard foremen, yard- 
men and bus operators — Brotherhood 
of Railroad Trainmen), 525, 957 
(certification). 

Ontario Northland Transportation Commis- 
sion, North Bay, and employees (Divi- 
sion No. 4, Railway Employees' 
Department, AFL), 957 (certification). 

Oshawa Railway Company (C.N.R.), and 
employees, 667, 1276 (agreement 
reached). 

Ottawa Airport 

See Canadian Air Express 

Ottawa Car and Aircraft Limited, Ottawa, 
and employees, 352-55 (report of 
Board and minority reports), 358 
(strike after Conciliation Board pro- 
cedure) . 

Ottawa Electric Railway Company, and 
employees, 175 (report of Board). 

Ottawa Hydro-Electric Commission, and 
employees, 33 (reasons for judgment). 

Ottawa Truss Company of Canada, and 
employees, 328, 532 (reasons for judg- 
ment). 

Pacific Elevators Limited, Vancouver, and 
employees, 526, 661 (certification). 

Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company, 
Vancouver, and employees (on Point 
Ellice and barge No. 2), 796, 957 
(certification). 

Paquet and Sons Limited, and employees, 525, 
661 (application withdrawn). 

Parkhill Bedding Limited, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 172. 

Paterson Steamships Limited, Fort William, 
and employees (Canadian Seamen's 
Union), 1133, 1272 (application with- 
drawn). 

Paymaster Consolidated Mines Limited, 
South Porcupine, and employees, 535, 
668 (Boa.rd established), 802, 1646-47 
(report of Board and minority report). 

Pearson Lumber Company, Quebec, and 
employees (freight handlers in harbour 
sheds), 327, 793 (application rejected). 

Pelee Shipping Company, Limited, St. 
Thomas, and employees (on Pelee — 
Canadian Seamen's Union), 1133, 1272 
(application withdrawn). 

Pelee Shipping Company. St. Thomas, and 
employees (Canadian Seamen's Union), 
1273, 1608 (application withdrawn). 

Penman's Limited, Paris, and employees, 33, 
40 (reasons for judgment) ; 171 (reasons 
for judgment). 

Picardy Limited, Winnipeg, and employees, 
535, 799 (agreement reached). 

Preston East Dome Mines Limited, South 
Porcupine, and employees, 535, 536 
(Board established), 802, 1647-49 
(report of Board and minority report). 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Prince Arthur Hotel (C.N.R.), Port Arthur, 
and employees (engineer's depart- 
ment), 1131 (certification), 1133. 

Quebec and Ontario Transportation Company, 
Limited, Montreal, and employees 
(Canadian Seamen's Union), 1133, 1272 
(application withdrawn). 

Quebec Central Transportation Company, 
Sherbrooke, and employees (bus oper- 
ators), 327, 525 (certification). 

Quebec Railway Light and Power Company, 
Limited (Montmorency Division), Que- 
bec, and employees, 1273, 1450 (appli- 
cation withdrawn). 

Railway Association of Canada, Montreal, 
and employees of certain railways, 526, 
957 (certification). 

Railway Express Agency, Inc., and employees, 
959. 

Ray-O-Vac (Canada) Limited, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 334, 668 (Board established), 
669, 1460-63 (report of Board and 
minority reports). 

Ray's Superior Stores, Limited, and Ray's 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees, 
667, 668 (Board established), 669, 965- 
68 (report of Board). 

Robert Reford Company, Limited, and em- 
ployees, 525, 661 (application with- 
drawn). 

Reliance Foundry Company, Limited, Van- 
couver, and employees, 799 (Board 
established), 802, 968 (report of 
Board). 

Riviere-du-Loup-Tadoussac Ferry Company, 
Limited, Montreal, and employees 
(officers on Biviere-du-Loup) , 796, 1450 
(application withdrawn). 

Rumford Laundry Limited, Brandon, and 
employees, 667, 960 (referred to pro- 
vincial Minister of Labour). 

Sarnia Steamships Limited, Sarnia, and 
employees, 1134, 1135, 1274 (reasons 
for judgment). 

Saskatchewan Co-operative Livestock Pro- 
ducers, Limited, Regina, and employees, 
326 (application rejected). 

Saskatchewan Co-operative Producers Limited, 
Regina, and employees, 326 (applica- 
tion rejected). 

Saskatchewan Pool Elevators Limited, and 
employees, 325 (certification). 

Saskatchewan Pool Terminals, Limited, Fort 
William, and employees, 326 (certifica- 
tion) . 

C. J. Savage, Quebec, and employees (freight 
handlers in harbour sheds), 327, 794 
(application rejected). 

Searle Grain Company, Limited, Fort 
William, and employees, 346 (report 
of Board). 

Seeley Products, Windsor, and employees, 358 
(appointment of I.D.I.C.) . 

Seven taxi-cab companies (Emile Lanthier, 
Abraham Livetsky, Paramount Service 
Enterprises Limited, Abe Anderson, 
Arthur C. Humphries, Samuel Kantor, 
Harpin Taxi Service), Montreal, and 
employees, 42, 173 (report of Board). 



lxxx 



INDEX 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 
Shell Canadian Tankers, Toronto, and 
employees (engineer officers — National 
Association of Marine Engineers of 
Canada, Inc.), 1450, 1607. 
Shell Oil Company of British Columbia 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees 
(deck, engine room and steward's 
departments), 1275, 1449 (certification). 
Shell Oil Company of British Columbia 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees 
(marine engineers), 1134, 1271 (certi- 
c at ion). 

Shipping Federation of Canada, Montreal, 
and employees (of various shipping 
companies of Quebec and Levis), 1608. 

Shipping Federation of Canada, Montreal, and 
employees (various steamship com- 
panies), 667 (agreement reached). 

Shipping Federation of Canada, Montreal, 
and employees (steamship companies, 
Saint John, N.B.), 327, 1131 (certifica- 
tion) . 

Shipping Limited, Montreal (Canadian Oil 
Company, Limited, Toronto), and 
employees, 795, 1272 (application with- 
drawn) . 

Sincennes-McNaughton Lines, Limited, Mont- 
real, and employees (Canadian Lake 
Seamen's Union), 959, 1607 (applica- 
tion rejected), 1785 (reason for 
judgment). 

Sincennes-McNaughton Lines, Limited, Mont- 
real, and employees (Canadian Seamen's 
Union), 1134, 1607 (application 
rejected), 1784 (reasons for judgment). 

Sincennes-McNaughton Lines, Limited, Mont- 
Hamilton, and employees, 41, 335, 669, 
682 (report of Board). 

Smith Brothers Motor Body Works, Toronto, 
and employees, 821 (appointment of 
I.D.I.C.). 

Smith Transport Limited, Montreal, and 
employees, 170 (application with- 
drawn) . 

Snyder's Limited, Waterloo, and employees. 
664 (reasons for judgment), 1138 
(Board reconvened). 

Southam Company, Limited, and H. S. 
South am and employees, 662 (reasons 
for judgment) . 

David Spencer Limited, Courtenay, and 
employees, 530, (reasons for judgment). 

David Spencer, Limited, Victoria, and 
employees, 36 (reasons for judgment). 

Standard Oil Company of British Columbia, 
Vancouver, and employees, 1133 (appli- 
cation withdrawn). 

Sterling Collieries Company, Limited, 
Edmonton and Stereo, and employees 
(Edmonton Construction Engineers 
Federal Union No. 216), 525, 661 
(application withdrawn). 

Sterling Collieries Company, Limited, 
Edmonton and Stereo, and employees 
(Western Association of Mechanical 
and Electrical Engineers, Local No. 7), 
32 (certification), 661, 794 (applica- 
tion rejected) . 

Joseph Stokes Rubber Company, Welland, and 
employees, 670, 682 (report of Board). 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 
Stovel Company, Limited, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 172, 335 (Board estab- 
lished), 53S, 1649-50 (report of 
Board) . 
Strong-Scott Company, Limited, Winnipeg, 

and employees, 536. ■ 
Sullivan Consolidated Mines, Limited, Mont- 
real, and employees, 529 (reasons for 
judgment), 663 (reasons for judgment). 

Systems Equipment Limited, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 334, 536 (Board estab- 
lished), 669, 969 (report of Board). 

Taggarts Service Limited, Montreal, and 
employees, 170 (application with- 
drawn) . 

Taxicab Companies (Emile Lanthier, etc.), 
Montreal, 42, 173 (report of Board). 

Temiscouata Railway Company, Riviere du 
Loup, and employees, 958, 1449 (certi- 
fication) . 

Terra Nova Steamship Company, Limited, 
Montreal, and employees (on Empire 
Gangway), 1783. 

Terra Nova Steamship Company, Limited, 
Montreal, and employees (on Terra 
Nova), 1608, 1783 (representation 
vote). 

SS. Texaco Brave Company, Limited. 
Toronto, and employees (on Texaco 
Brave), 1273, 1607, 1786 (reasons for 
judgment). 

SS. Texaco Chief Company, Limited, 
Toronto, and employees (on Texaco 
Chief), 1273-74, 1607, 1786 (reasons for 
judgment) . 

SS. Texaco Warrior Company, Limited, 
Toronto, and employees (on Texaco 
Warrior). 1274, 1607, 1786 (reasons for 
judgment) . 

Thermoid Mould and Tool Works, Welland, 
and employees, 41, 173, (Board estab- 
lished), 335, 1154 (report of Board, 
supplemental report, and interim 
report). 

Toronto Broadcasting Company (Station 
CKEY), Toronto, and employees, 173 
(agreement reached). 

Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway, and 
employees, 536, 667 (agreement 
reached) . 

Toronto Terminals Railway Company, To- 
ronto, and employees (restaurant). 
1133, 1271 (representation vote, 1440 
(certification) . 

Township of Tisdale, South Porcupine, and 
employees (general workers), 41, 173 
(agreement reached). 

Trans-Canada Air Lines, Winnipeg, and 
employees (air engineers), 1450, 1783 
(application rejected). 

Trans-Canada Air Lines, and employees 
(Canadian Air Pilots' Association), 
1789. 

Trans-Canada Air Lines, Winnipeg, and 
employees (pursers-stewards), 1783. 

Trans-Canada Air Lines. Winnipeg, and 
employees (stewardesses. Toronto 
Branch), 794 (application withdrawn), 
795 

Trans-Canada Air Lines, Winnipeg, and 
employees (stewardesses). 1783. 



INDEX 



lxxxi 






Wartime Labour Relations 
Regulations— Con. 

Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Transit Tankers and Terminals Limited, Mon- 
treal, and employees (Canadian Sea- 
men's Union), 793 (certification), 1276. 

Transit Tankers and Terminals Limited, 
Montreal, and employees (on Transoay, 
Transtream, Transriver and Trans- 
lake — Canadian Merchant Service 
Guild), 1784. 

Tuckett Tobacco Company, Limited, Hamil- 
ton, and employees, 526 (reasons for 
judgment). 

Twelve coal distributing companies, Toronto, 
and employees, 328. 

Union Cab Company, Limited, Sudbury, and 
employees, 822. 

Union Gas Company of Canada, Limited, 
Chatham, and employees (National 
Union of Natural Gas Workers, Local 
2), 534 (reasons for judgment). 

Union Gas Company of Canada, Limited, 
Chatham, and employees (National 
Union of Natural Gas Workers, Locals 
1, 2 and 3), 536 (Board established), 
669, 970-77 (report of Board). 

Union Steamships Limited, and employees 
(Canadian Merchant Service Guild), 
1137, 1276 (Board established), 1451, 
1628-33 (report of Board and minority 
report). 

Union Steamships Limited, Vancouver, and 
employees (Canadian Seamen's Union), 
661, 794 (application rejected). 

Union Steamships Limited, and employees 
(National Association of Marine En- 
gineers of Canada, Inc.), 798, 960 
(Board established), 1138, 1457-60 (re- 
port of Board and minority reports), 
1610 (settlement reached). 

Union Steamships Limited, and employees 
(Seafarers' International Union of 
North America), 1276, 1451 (Board 
established), 1609. 

United Gas Company of Canada Limited, 
Chatham, and employees, 328. 

United Grain Growers Terminals, Limited, 
Vancouver, and employees (Inter- 
national Union of Operating Engineers, 
Local 882), 327, 660 (certification). 

United Grain Growers Terminals, Vancouver, 
and employees (United Grain Elevator 
Workers' Union, Local 501), 326-27, 
525 (certification), 960. 

United Towing and Salvage Company, Limi- 
ted, Montreal, and employees (Canadian 
Seamen's Union), 799, 1451 (Board 
established), 1609. 

United Towing and Salvage Company, Limi- 
ted, Montreal, and employees (National 
Association of Marine Engineers of 
Canada, Inc). 1608. 

Universal Fruit Company, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 172, 960 (agreement 
reached) . 

Upper Canada Mines Limited, Dobie, Ont., 
and employees. 536, 537 (Board estab- 
lished). 802, 1650-53 (report of Board 
and minority report). 

Upper Lakes and St. Lawrence Transporta- 
tion Company, Limited, Toronto, and 
employees (Canadian Seamen's Union), 
1133, 1272 (application withdrawn). 



Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations — Con. 
Proceedings Under Wartime Labour 

Relations Regulations : — Con. 

Upper Lakes and St. Lawrence Transporta- 
tion Company, Toronto, and employees 
(National Association of Marine 
Engineers of Canada, Inc.), 795, 958 
(representation vote), 1132 (applica- 
tion rejected). 

Arthur Vaillancourt, Quebec, and employees 
(freight handlers in harbour sheds), 
327, 794 (application rejected). 

Vancouver Barge Transportation Company, 
Vancouver, and employees, 172, 335 
(Board established), 538, 977-81 (re- 
port of Board and minority report). 

Vancouver Hotel Company, Limited, Van- 
couver, and employees, 169 (application 
rejected) . 

Various railway companies: 

See Canadian National Railways; Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway Company, etc. 

Various steamship companies (Snipping 
Federation of Canada), Montreal, and 
employees, 667 (agreement reached). 

Victoria Tile and Brick Supply Company, 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees, 
328. 

Wagner Tours 

See Acadian Lines Limited. 

William Waldie and Sons, Limited, Castlegar, 
B.C., and employees (on Eleco the 
Second), 32 (certification). 

Frank Waterhouse Company, Vancouver, and 
employees (Canadian Merchant Service 
Guild, Inc.), 334 (agreement reached). 

Frank Waterhouse and Company, Limited, 
and employees (Canadian Merchant 
Service Guild), 1137. 1276 (Board es- 
tablished), 1451. 1628-33 (report of 
Board and minority report) . 

Frank Waterhouse and Company, Limited, 
and employees (National Association of 
Marine Engineers of Canada. Inc.), 798. 
960 (Board established), 1138, 1457-60 
(report of Board and minority reports), 
1610 (settlement reached). 

Weidman Brothers Limited, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 173 (agreement reached). 

Welland Vale Manufacturing Company, St. 
Catharines, and employees, 42 (agree- 
ment reached). 

Welton-Malmgren Manufacturing Company, 
Limited, Winnipeg, and employees, 334, 
536 (agreement reached). 

Western Canadian Greyhound Lines, Limited, 
Calgary, and employees, 173 (agreement 
reached). 

Western Rawhide and Harness Manufactur- 
ing Company, St. Boniface, and 
employees, 42 (agreement reached). 

Westward Shipping Limited, Vancouver, and 
employees (on Standard Service and 
B.C. Standard), 1272 (representation 
vote), 1273, 1449 (certification). 

Wheat City Dairy, Brandon, and employees, 
334, 536 (agreement reached). 

Winnipeg Electric Company, Winnipeg, and 
employees, 173 (agreement reached). 

Wonder Bakeries, Limited, Ideal Bakery, 
Toronto, and employees (Greenwood 
Ave. Depot), 328, 531. 

Yale and Towne Manufacturing Company 
(Canadian Division), St. Catharines, 
and employees, 33, 38 (reasons for 
judgment), 170 (reasons for judgment). 



Ixxxii 



INDEX 



Wartime Prices and Trade Board: 

resignation of Mr. Donald Gordon, chair- 
man, 487. 
annual report (1946), 598. 

Welding: 

Alta.— 

amendment in Welding Act, 839; (provisions 
of new Labour Act (consolidation of 
Labour Welfare Act, etc.), 837, 843. 
See also Industrial Welfare; Public Wel- 
fare. 
Welfare : 

See Industrial Welfare. 

Western Electric Company: 

agreement with Association of Communi- 
cations Equipment Workers, 778. 
Weston, George, Limited : 

pension plan, 1501. 

White Collar Workers: 

U.S.A.— 

trade union membership, 637. 

Wholesale Associations : 

U.S.A.— 

progress of wholesale co-operative associa- 
tions in 1945, 396. 

Wholesale Prices : 

See Prices. 

Window Cleaners : 

Canada — 

window cleaners' code prepared by Cana- 
dian Standards Association, 775. 

Women in Employment: 

resolution adopted by I.LjO. Industrial Com- 
mittee on Inland Transport, 1122. 

Canada — 

effect of 1947 income tax rate on net com- 
bined incomes of working couples, 293- 
97 — position in United Kingdom and 
U.S.A., 294; summary of new tax posi- 
tion, 295; effects of war on employed 
women, 295; current labour market 
conditions for women, 296. 
admission of Polish girls from Europe for 
employment in mills of Dionne Spinning 
Mill Company, 629, 1412. 

Alta.: new regulations under Government 
Liquor Control Act, 60. 

Ont.: provision of new minimum wage order 
governing women workers under scope 
of Minimum Wage Act, 697. 

United Kingdom: provisions of Factories 
(Hours of Employment in Factories 
Using Electricity) Order (1947), 1413; 
appeal for women workers to reduce 
labour shortages, 918; decrease in num- 
ber of industrial accidents during 1945, 
151; Committee appointed to study 
•two-shift systems, recommends amend- 
ments in Employment of Women and 
Young Persons Act (1936), 1268. 

U.S.A.: post-war turnover of women workers 
in manufacturing industry, 637; ap- 
pointment of wage boards to recom- 
mend revision of minimum rates for 
women and minors in hotel, restaurant 
and laundry industries, in New York 
state, 11; eight-hour day, 48-hour week 
recommended at National Conference on 
Labour Legislation, 207; legislation 
governing women employed in domestic 
service, factories, hotels and restaur- 
ants, in New York state, 285-86. 



Woods Workers: 

movement of farmers from Canada to assist 
in woods operations in United States, 
1764. 
Canada — 

employment of woods workers from dis- 
placed persons' camps, 1245, 1407. 

Work Injuries: 

See Accidents. 

Worker Security: 

See Social Security. 

Working Conditions: 

See Conditions of Employment. 

Working Parties: 

United Kingdom — 

survey of major industries by tripartite 
working parties — recommendations for 
increasing efficiency in _ the pottery, 
cotton, boot and shoe, hosiery and furn- 
iture industries, 154-58. 

"Working Wives": 

Canada — 

working wives, their income and the new 
income tax, 293 97. 

Workmen's Compensation : 

Canada — 

provisions of Government Employees' Com- 
pensation Act, 1326. 
fatal industrial accidents during first 
quarter of 1947 as reported by pro- 
vincial boards, 766. 
analysis of 1946 fatalities by industries, 

causes, etc., 472. 
summary of 1947 edition of Workmen's 
Compensation in Canada, a Comparison 
of Provincial Laws, 1265. 
summary of 1947 edition of Provincial 

Labour Standards, 1266. 
increased benefits recommended by C.C. of 
L., 1582. 

Alta.: new orders under Act, 696-97; amend- 
ments in Act, 380, 839; application of 
Public Service Pension Act to em- 
ployees of Workmen's Compensation 
Board, 1024; recommendations of Fed- 
eration of Labour, 259. 

B.C.: annual report of Board (1946), 1087; 
workman's widow's claim against the 
CroAvn upheld by Supreme Court of 
Canada, 1339. 

Man.: annual report of Board (1946). 910; 
legislative resolution defeated, 1023. 

N.B.: annual report of Board (1946), 768. 

N.S.: amendments in Act, 1091; 1331; annual 
report of Board (1946), 767. 

Ont.: revised regulations under Act, 60-61; 
regulations under Act providing for 
establishment of Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Board Superannuation Plan, 1025; 
increased benefits under Act, 839; 
workmen's compensation as a factor in 
industrial costs — memorandum issued 
by I.A.P.A.. 557; annual report of 
Board (1946). 1088. 



INDEX 



Lxxxiii 



Workmen's Compensation — Con. 

Que.: amendments in Act respecting indus- 
trial diseases urged in legislative resolu- 
tion, 1490; other amendments, 1487; 
new regulation under Act, 1683; report 
of Commission (1945), 1688, (1944), 
117; report of Division of Industrial 
Hygiene (1941-43), 1664. 

Sask.: amendment in Blind Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act (1945), 1492; amend- 
ments in Workmen's Compensation 
(Accident Fund) Act, 1492; annual 
report of Board (1946), 910; brakes- 
man's widow loses claim against railway 
company, 1342. 

Australia: policy of Joint Coal Board estab- 
lished to administer measures to remedy 
conditions in coal industry in New 
South Wales, 1416; resolution adopted 
by Conference of Commonwealth and 
state labour ministers, 1822. 

United Kingdom: appointment of Committee 
on Compensation for Industrial Dis- 
eases, 776; compensation for industrial 
injuries — alternative remedies of work- 
men's compensation and action for 
damages considered by Committee on 
Alternative Remedies, 159-62. 

U.S.A.: expansion of legislation, 1099; recom- 
mendations of National Conference on 
Labour Legislation, 206; amended legis- 
lation in state of Kentucky, 62; inclu- 
sion of domestic workers under law in 
New York state, 285. 

See also Legal Decisions. 



Works Committees: 

See Labour-Management Co-operation; 
Labour-Management Production Com- 
mittees. 

World Calendar: 

Canada — 

adoption of perpetual world calendar 
recommended by C.C. of L., 500. 

World Federation of Trade Unions: 

proposed affiliation of German trade unions 
discussed at fifth Inter-zonal Confer- 
ence of Trade Unions, 1777. 

relations with I.L.O., 1595. 

continued support of C.I.O., 1776. 

legislative recommendation of C.C. of L., 
499; report of C. H. Millard to con- 
vention of, 1584. 

Young Workers: 

See Juvenile Employment; Youth Employ- 
ment and Training. 

Youth Employment and Training: 

protection of young workers urged by 
I.L.O. Industrial Committee on Inland 
Transport, 1122. 

Canada — 

functions of Community Youth Placement 
Centres established by N.E.S., 642. 

Man.: amendments in Highway Traffic Act re 
minimum age of farm truck and speed 
tractor drivers, and chauffeurs, 1023. 

U.S.A.: liability of juvenile workers to 
machine accidents, 1248. 



The Labour Gazette 

PREPARED AND EDITED BY 

The Department of Labour, Ottawa, Canada 

Minister — Hon. Humphrey Mitchell 

Deputy Minister— Arthur MacNamara, C.M.G., LL.D. 

Editor — Harry J. Walker 

Assistant Editor — John Main waring Circulation Manager — C. E. St. George 



Volume XLVII] 



JANUARY, 1947 



[Number 1 



Notes of Current Interest 



In a New Year's message 
New Year's to the people of Canada, 

message of Hon. Humphrey Mitchell, 

Minister of Minister of Labour said: 

Labour "The termination of a war 

generally has meant eco- 
nomic and social disorganization. When World 
War II was brought to a victorious conclusion, 
we could not expect that Canada would avoid 
the difficulties which follow in the wake of 
such a gigantic conflict. By participation in 
the war alone, we would have been faced with 
a period of re-settlement but war also pro- 
duces upheaval in the human mind which adds 
to the problems that must be met on the path 
back to peace. This personal and material 
dislocation is not confined to any one country, 
nor to any one class. It affects all. 

"Considering what we may have expected 
in the way of post-war problems, I feel that 
we have come through the first sixteen months 
much better than might have been anticipated. 

"Reconversion has moved with expedition, 
and the employment situation is remarkably 
good, confounding the pessimists who pro- 
phesied widespread idleness. I am happy to 
say that reports from a large group of em- 
ployers show employment this year was over 
forty-^five per cent higher than in 1939. In 
the manufacturing industries, the increase is 
more than sixty per cent, and in logging over 
one hundred and fifty per cent. 

"We are further fortified, of course, by 
having the protection of unemployment insur- 
ance against particular situations of temporary 
unemployment. Before the war we had built 
up no social measure of this kind. 
79014— 1£ 



"Without being too optimistic, one may 
look to 1947 with confidence. Apart from 
seasonal setbacks which were to be expected 
in late 1946, the general level of employment 
shows no tendency to drop. On the contrary, 
there are factors which should make for a 
continuance of the present level. We still 
have many shortages which can be overcome 
only by intensive production. 

"Since V-J Day, Canada's economy has had 
to re-absorb into peacetime civilian occupa- 
tion nearly three-quarters of a million veter- 
ans, as well as half a million war workers. 
This task has been carried through almost to 
completion, which is another exemplification 
of the resiliency of the Canadian people and 
particularly the good common sense in all 
walks of life. 

"I am sure it is the wish of everyone that 
goodwill in industry may be in abundant 
evidence throughout 1947, so that Canada 
may hold in peacetime the industrial gains 
she made during the war. 

"If this ambition is realized, I feel sure 
that each and every Canadian will enjoy in a 
material sense the happy New Year which I 
wish to one and all." 

Canadian labour leaders in 
New Year's their New Year's messages 

messages made pleas for the develop- 

of labour ment of social security 

leaders through the co-operative 

efforts not only of indi- 
viduals, but of organized groups of citizens. 
Mr. Percy R. Bengough, President of the 
Trades and Labour Congress of Canada, 
stated: "To win the war, we all pulled 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



together; and if we all desire a worthwhile 
peace and happiness, we can have it with a 
little co-operative effort on the part of all." 

Mr. A. R. Mosher, President of the Cana- 
dian Congress of Labour, expressed a similar 
thought when he said: "Let us then enter 
upon the New Year with a determination to 
do whatever we can as individuals and groups 
to make the world a better place in which to 
live. This will involve the elimination of 
those principles and practices which prevent 
the fullest production and equitable distribu- 
tion of goods and services required for the 
highest human happiness ..." 

Mr. Gerard Picard, General President of the 
Canadian and Catholic Confederion of Labour, 
declared that "in 1947, the C.C.CX. will pursue 
its social mission with renewed energy. It will 
continue to make known its doctrine and its 
plan of action, and hopes to be better under- 
stood by working people, employers and gov- 
ernment officials. The C.C.C.L. wants social 
peace and respect for social justice." 

Mr. Bengough asserted in regard to the 
attitude of labour towards work stoppages 
during the coming year, that "organized 
labour does not anticipate and certainly does 
not desire any stoppages of work. It can be 
taken for granted," he continued, "that work- 
ing people . . . quit work because of a 
grievance serious enough, in their opinion, 
to stop working and pass up an urgently 
needed pay cheque. It can also be taken for 
granted," he said, "that a quiet, sensible dis- 
cussion around the table before the strike, 
instead of after the strike, would have saved 
both the employers and employees and pos- 
sibly a lot more citizens a lot of grief, worry 
and bad feelings." 

He asserted that Canadian workers, although 
proud of their country, "are not completely 
satisfied for the reason that most of them live 
in insecurity . . . Unemployment insurance 
does not go far in paying bills with present 
costs." He urged that provision be made for 
health insurance and old-age retirement funds. 
"Social security is the sure antidote for social 
unrest, and the antidote for industrial strife 
is the orderly process of negotiation and col- 
lective agreements." Concluding, Mr. Ben- 
gough said: "Teamwork for peace, and the 
development of Canada; full production; jobs 
and security; are the best objectives for 
Canada in 1947." 

Mr. Mosher claimed that "we now must 
apply to the problems of production and 
distribution the same qualities of foresight, 
planning and devotion which united the 
nations during the war . . . Mankind must 
achieve a new sense of unity, of tolerance, of 
good will . . . Above all, there must be a 



willingness to put aside selfish, personal pre- 
judices for the sake of the common good." 
Mr. Mosher indicated some of the weaknesses 
in the present economic system and urged 
Canadians to strive for "improved methods of 
carrying on the world's affairs." In conclusion, 
he sounded a hopeful note. "In the light of 
what humanity has achieved in the past, 
despite failure, frustration and tragedy, there 
still remains the capacity to march onward 
and upward towards the realization of our 
highest hopes and aspirations." 

Mr. Picard, in a similar vein said: "At the 
beginning of 1947, let us look to the future 
with confidance, and may men of good will set 
boldly to work to insure the full development 
of the human being; to protect the dignity of 
labour within the professional bounds of true 
democracy based on justice and charity, where 
spiritual values have precedence over material 
interests, while at the same time these mater- 
ial interests are not ignored or neglected". 

The accompanying table 
Employment contains the latest statistics 

and industrial available reflecting indus- 

statistics trial conditions in Canada. 

Figures are shown for 
certain months in the current year as com- 
pared with the corresponding period in 1945. 

Employment and Earnings — I n d u s t r i a 1 
employment showed further expansion on 
November 1, according to the monthly report 
on employment and payrolls issued by the 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Reports from 
16,274 establishments indicated combined 
staffs of 1,862,451 at November 1, an increase 
of 38,844 workers from the level of the 
previous month. 

The general index of employment (base 
1926=100) stood at 181-9 in November as 
compared with 178-1 in October and 171-2 
at November 1, 1945. The latest index is 
the highest for November in the last 26 
years with the exception of the indexes of 
183-8, 188-7 and 183-3 recorded respectively 
at November 1, in 1944, 1943 and 1942. 

Weekly payrolls of eight leading indus- 
tries rose 2-7 per cent to $62,077,582 at 
November. The weekly earnings per employee 
averaged $33.33 at November 1, as compared 
with $33.15 at October 1. Per capita figures 
at the beginning of November in previous 
years were: 1945, $31.95; 1944, $32.29; 1943, 
$31.60; 1942, $29.81 and 1941, $27.02. From 
June 1, 1941, when the record was instituted, 
to the date under review, the average weekly 
earnings has risen by 32 per cent. 

Improvement in employment over the 
previous month was noted at November 1 in 
manufacturing and in most of the non- 
manufacturing industries. The settlement of 



1947] 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



STATISTICS REFLECTING INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS IN CANADA 

Note. — Official statistics except where noted. Much of the statistical data in this table, with an analysis, are included 
in the Monthly Review of Business Statistics issued by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 



Classification 


1946 




1945 




December | November 


October 


December 


November 


October 


Employment- 




181-9 
7,062 
6,763 
3,129 

37,111 


178-1 
6,426 
7,149 
3,207 

34,891 
1-0 

149-8 
33-15 

71-4 
42-9 

110-8 
126-8 

179-0 
184-2 
146-1 
185-5 
284-3 
155-3 
168-1 
140-7 
135-2 
198-3 
174-1 
227-1 
210-5 
276-8 

101-8 
153-6 
85-0 

393,001,000 
186,393,000 
204,150,000 

6,312,554,000 
1,029,360,000 
3,476,731,000 
1,301,651,000 

329,155 

32,678,000 
28,998,000 

26,637,000 
21,821,000 

5,466,555,000 

33,611,000 
77,308,000 

74,958 

123,841 

8,448 

240,828 

1,625,000 

30,232,000 

17,219,000 

29,745,000 

36,831,000 

297,160,000 
2,433,000 
3,773,000 

3,550,001,000 

104,876,000 

376,436 


173-2 
7,220 
4,795 
3,067 

57,612 


171-2 
10,083 

6,897 
4,725 

53,325 


168-7 


Applications for employment 2 . No. 




9,754 
8,189 






5,076 

36,717 
1-4 


Unemployment insurance claims 

No. 




Earnings and Hours- 
Index, aggregate weekly payrolls' . 

Per capita weekly earnings $ 

Average hourly earnings cents 




153-8 

33-33 

72-7 

42-4 

111-4 
127-1 

181-3 
180-2 
138-7 
191-5 
197-7 
154-0 
183-6 
150-0 
161-5 
204-9 
197-3 
245-7 
223-4 
257-4 

102-5 
154-7 
85-0 

433,302,000 
198,164,000 
232,219,000 

6,211,495,000 
1,042,421,000 
3,460,146,000 
1,430,543,000 

321,264 


139-5 

31-63 

67-0 

44-8 

103-3 
120-1 

193-0 
194-5 
114-0 
206-3 
235-4 
141-8 
189-8 
143-2 
167-4 
170-0 
232-8 
256-1 
187-4 
195-9 

112-5 

146-6 
92-2 

357,595,000 
121,192,000 
234,826,000 

6,084,752,000 

992,000,000 

2,865,329,000 

1,227,065,000 

249,571 

31,959,000 
26,317,000 

25,019,000 
21,802,000 

4,802,570,000 

13,541,000 
25,787,000 

135,225 

219,281 

15,456 

239,749 

1,551,000 

34,473,000 

14,398,000 

34,476,000 

40,213,000 

223,248,000 
2,169,000 
3,061,000 

3,228,710,000 

64,942,000 

276,930 


139-3 
31-95 

67-5 
44-9 

103-1 
119-9 

189-9 
197-7 
130-6 
211-0 
201-2 
139-7 
173-7 
138-2 
156-2 
158-8 
218-2 
213-3 
200-9 
221-5 

107-2 
145-0 
93-9 

383,669,000 
142,409,000 
238,637,000 

8,580,689,000 

998,600,000 

2,816,218,000 

1,314,321,000 

295,336 

30,278,000 
25,559,000 

25,764,000 
22,439,000 

5,298,098,000 

18,116,000 
44,998,000 

134,651 

207,981 

13,360 

220,755 

1,768,000 

32,240,000 

15,484,000 

35,000,000 

40,609,000 

242,891,000 
2,285,000 
3,655,000 

3,236,986,000 

76,137,000 

299,160 


137-8 




32 08 




67-8 




44-7 


Prices- 




102-9 




127-1 


119-7 


Physical Yoiume of Business- 


194-5 






210-8 






132-9 






231-9 






142-2 






144-8 






160-7 






129-1 






144-5 






154-0 






211-2 






203-8 






189-8 






237-2 


Other Business Indicators- 
Common stocks, index 4 


tl07-4 


104-2 




142-5 


Bond yields, Dominion, index* 

Trade, external, excluding gold. % 

Imports, excluding gold 8 

Exports, excluding gold $ 

Bank debits to individual 

accounts S 

Bank notes in circulation* 1 $ 

Bank deposits in savings $ 


t85-0 


94-4 
367,300,000 




134,404,000 




227,901,000 




5,749,151,000 

1,007,400,000 

2,991,624,000 

978,652,000 

302, 171 
32,402,000 


Railways — 
Car loadings, rev. freight cars 7 . . 
Canadian National Railways 


274,656 








27,758,000 


Canadian Pacific Railway 




26,264,000 
22,518,000 


28,646,000 






23,777,000 


Steam railways, revenue freight 
in ton-miles 




5,494,990,000 


Building permits % 




23,787,000 
48,004,000 

135,269 

222,644 

9,370 

231,204 

1,577,000 

35,415,000 

17,468,000 

22,679,000 

37,012,000 

288,015,000 
2,519,000 
3,566,000 

3,566,702,000 

109,679,000 

364,304 


19,501,000 


Contracts awarded ... $ 




29,428,000 

140,693 

205,846 

14,555 

229,550 


Mineral production- 
Pig iron tons 








Ferro-alloys tons 




Cold oz 




Coal tons 




1,194,000 
25,172,000 
17,245,000 
32,609,000 
38,860,000 

325,095,000 
2,227,000 
3,747,000 

3,309,021,000 

69,225,000 

310,980 


Copper lb. 

Nickel lb 

Lead lb. 

Zinc lb 




Timber scaled in B.C F.B.M. 

Flour production bbl. 




Footwear production pairs 




stations k.w.h. 

Newsprint production tons 









t Week ended December 26, 1946. 

1 Base 1926 = 100. 2 Daily averages. » Base June, 1941 = 100. * Base, 1935-1939 = 100. 

necessary, for seasonal variation. f Notes in the hands of the public at the end of the month, 

ended December 28, 1946, and corresponding previous periods. 



* Adjusted, whose 
7 Figures for four weeks 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



several strikes was a contributing factor to 
the gain in manufacturing. The iron and 
steel and rubber divisions reported the 
re-employment of 12,500 and 4,600 workers, 
respectively, following the termination of 
industrial disputes. Smaller advances were 
noted in animal food, textile, chemical and 
electrical apparatus plants, also affected by 
the settlement of strikes. Seasonal curtail- 
ment was indicated in lumber mills and 
vegetable food-processing. In the non- 
manufacturing groups, logging camps reported 
the addition of 13,900 workers. Considerable 
improvement was noted in mining, communi- 
cations, transportation, building construction 
and trade. The services division showed a 
seasonal decline in employment. 

Prices — Based on the 1926 average as 100, 
the general index of wholesale prices was 
111-4 in November as compared with 110-8 
in October and 103-9 in November, 1945. 
The indexes for vegetable and animal products 
rose 0-3 and 0-2 points respectively. 
Increases in the wholesale prices of shingles 
and wood pulp caused the index for wood 
products to advance from 138-3 in October 
to 140-9 in November. The index for textile 
products rose from 98-2 to 98-4; for non- 
metallic minerals, from 103-8 to 104-0 and 
chemical products, from 94-7 to 95-3. No 
changes were noted in the indexes for iron 
products at 128-6 and non-ferrous metals at 
89-7. The index of consumers' goods rose 
from 103-0 to 103-2 and of producers' goods 
from 107-3 to 107-9. The index of Canadian 
farm products moved 0-6 points, from 112-8 
to 113-4. 

The cost-of-living index, based on prices 
in the years 1935 to 1939 as 100, remained 
unchanged at 127-1 for December 2, 1946. 
Lower prices of eggs and some vegetables 
were responsible for a slight decrease in the 
food index from 146-6 to 146-4, but this loss 
was balanced by small increases in several 
other groups. Fuel and light advanced from 
108-6 to 109-2, with scattered increases in 
western coal prices. There were fractional 
advances of 0-1 and 0*2 points respectively in 
clothing and home furnishings and services. 
The miscellaneous group remained at 114-1, 
and rentals at 113-4. The increase in the 
general index since August, 1939, was 26-1 
per cent. 

All prisoners of war in 
All prisoners Canada have been returned 

of war to Europe, according to a 

returned home statement issued recently by 
Mr. Arthur MacNamara, 
Deputy Minister of Labour. 

"It has been reported in various quarters 
on several occasions recently", Mr. MacNamara 



said, "that a group of the prisoners of war 
who had been in Canada were to be retained 
in this country. The fact is that no prisoners 
of war are to be kept in Canada." 

A considerable group of prisoners of war 
left Canada by boat on December 22, and 
the few who remained after that date left 
for Europe by the end' of the year. 

The Labour Department had been asked 
by employers who had engaged the services 
of some of the prisoners, to allow some of 
them to remain on in Canada after the main 
body went home. However, the decision of 
the Government was to not comply with these 
requests, but to dispatch all prisoners of war 
to Europe. 

In an article in the January 
Deputy Minister issue of Health, Mr. Arthur 
of Labour MacNamara, Deputy Min- 

discusses ister of Labour, has 

employment of analyzed some of the argu- 
older workers ments that have been used 

against the employment of 
older workers. "Too old at forty" was a 
popular slogan with man}' employers in the 
depressed 1930's, when the supply of workers 
greatly exceeded the demand, and the 
prejudice it aroused has not been entirely 
removed. 

Arguments commonly used for refusing 
employment to older workers were enum- 
erated by Mr. MacNamara as follows: (1) 
the older worker is not adaptable to new 
learning or techniques; (2) old age results 
in declining productivity; (3) pension plans 
of industry are affected adversely by the 
employment of workers over 40 years of age; 

(4) accident frequency increases with age; 

(5) group insurance plans which include a 
high percentage of older workers are much 
more expensive. 

Discussing these arguments seriatim, Mr. 
MacNamara asserted that the necessary 
employment of older workers during the war 
refuted the claim that they were not adapt- 
able to new techniques. "During the critical 
manpower shortages, the older worker came 
into his own and many industries realized 
that the former practice of turning the cold 
shoulder to workers over 40 was not only 
cruel, but stupid." Defects peculiar to 
advancing age were more than balanced by 
such qualities as "judgment, dignity, patience, 
calmness, unselfishness, trustworthiness and 
loyalty." 

Mr. MacNamara recalled that a pre-war 
report on the employment of older men in 
the automobile industry showed that the 
earnings of piece workers reached their peak 
in the age group, 50 to 55 years. This, he 
held, tended to refute the argument that the 



1947] 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



older worker could not hold his own in the 
matter of production. 

While it is true that a middle-aged worker 
coming on a payroll for the first time could 
not complete a sufficient number of years' 
work to enable him to retire on full pension, 
he would doubtless be willing to accept a 
smaller pension, or in lieu of that, the return 
of his contributions with interest upon 
reaching retirement age. This factor should 
not provide any insuperable barrier to the 
satisfactory employment of the older worker, 
Mr. MacNamara contended. 

Referring to a commonly held belief that 
older workers were more likely to be involved 
in industrial accidents, Mr. MacNamara 
pointed out that statistics show that the 
highest incidence of such accidents come in 
the age group of 20 to 24 years. This, he 
said, had been attributed to "youth's inex- 
perience and light-hearted willingness to take 
a chance." On the other hand, "the most 
unlikely years during which workers will suffer 
an industrial accident are between the ages 
of 30 and 55." While admitting that it 
usually takes longer for an older person to 
recover from injuries, Mr. MacNamara said 
that it was significant that "the age of the 
employee is not usually a factor in fixing 
rates for workmen's compensation." 

The fifth argument enumerated by Mr. 
MacNamara as prejudicing the employment 
of older workers, that of group insurance, 
might, he said, have some validity. How- 
ever, many plant managements do not 
provide this benefit and in cases where 
provision is made for it, unless a considerable 
percentage of the working force is in the 
older age brackets, the difference in cost is 
usually "inconsequential". 

In summarizing his rebuttal of the argu- 
ments advanced against the employment of 
older workers, Mr. MacNamara declared that 
"it would appear that any evidence which 
tends to prove that older workers are less 
desirable is of a meagre and fragmentary 
nature. The older worker can do his share 
if given a chance." 

Preliminary figures on strike 
Preliminary activity in Canada for 1946 

figures on show that during the year 

strikes in Canada there were 205 strikes, 
during 1946 involving 136,377 workers, 

with a time loss of 4,520,424 
man-working days. These figures will be 
revised at the time the annual summary of 
strikes and lockouts is prepared for a sub- 
sequent issue of the Labour Gazette. 

In 1945 there were 197 strikes, with 96,068 
workers involved and a time loss of 1,457.420 
days. 



While the time loss of 4£ million man- 
working days constituted a record, the greatest 
previous loss having been in 1919 when 3£ 
million days were lost, the number of strikes 
during 1946 and the number of workers involved 
have been exceeded in other years. 

During 1946 strike activity reached its peak 
in the summer months. Only ten strikes were 
in existence during the month of December, 
involving a time loss of 24,000 days as com- 
pared with a monthly average of 380,000 days. 

At the fourth annual 
Dominion- Dominion-Provincial Farm 

Provincial Labour Conference, which 

Farm Labour took place in Ottawa on 

Conference December 5 and 6 , the 

representatives of the Prov- 
inces indicated their desire to continue to 
co-operate in the Dominion-Provincial Farm 
Labour Program for the coming year. 

At the opening meeting reports of the past 
year's activities were given by the Provincial 
Directors of Farm Labour who all expressed 
the view that the Dominion-Provincial Farm 
Labour Agreements had provided very satis- 
factory co-operative machinery during the 
past year. 

Commendation was expressed of the work 
of the National Employment Service, in 
giving assistance to the various Provinces in 
recruiting and transferring workers for sea- 
sonal farm employment. 

Addressing the meeting, Mr. Arthur 
MacNamara, Deputy Minister of Labour, 
declared: "It is little short of a miracle that 
over 20,000 placements were made on farms 
this year under the Dominion-Provincial 
Farm Labour Program, when one considers 
the difficulties which faced us." Mr. 
MacNamara referred to the splendid co- 
operation between the Federal and Provincial 
Governments which had brought such satis- 
factory results, and said: "This large number 
of placements would not have been possible 
without the driving force and hard work of 
the Provincial Ministers and their officials." 

Other subjects discussed at the conference 
included the placement of Polish veterans, 
training, housing, working and living condi- 
tions of farm workers, and possible modifica- 
tions in farm labour agreements between the 
Provinces and the Dominion for 1947-48. 

The meeting was attended by several 
Provincial Ministers of Agriculture, including 
Hon. A. W. Mackenzie, of Nova Scotia, Hon. 
F. H. Putnam, of British Columbia, Hon. I. C. 
Nollet, of Saskatchewan, and Hon. D. L. 
Campbell, of Manitoba, and by Provincial 
Directors of Farm Labour and Officers of the 
Department of Labour and of the National 
Employment Service. 



6 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



JANUARY 



Mr. G. V. Haythorne, Chief of the Farm 
Labour Division, Department of Labour, was 
chairman of the conference. 

In view of his temporary 
C. A. L. Murchison incapacity to perform his 
pro tern U.I.C. duties as a Commissioner 
commissioner and member of the Unem- 

ployment Insurance Com- 
mission, Mr. G. W. Ritchie has been granted a 
leave of absence from the duties of that office 
for a period of six months from January 1, 
1947, inclusive, or until such date within that 
time as he resumes the duties of the position. 
He will, however, continue his duties as 
Chairman of the Regional Advisory Board, 
Department of Labour at Toronto. 

Mr. C. A. L. Murchison of Ottawa, will act 
as Commissioner and member of the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Commission during Mr. 
Ritchie's absence on leave. Mr. Murchison 
will perform these functions in addition to 
his present duties as Chairman of the National 
War Labour Board. 

The Minister of National 
Wage increases Revenue and Acting Min- 
and income ister of Labour, the Hon- 

tax deductions ourable Dr. J. J. McCann, 

announced on December 17, 
1946, that the National War Labour Board, 
when requested by Income Tax Authorities, 
would examine cases where employers had 
increased wage rates after December 1, 1946, 
and had paid their employees the increased 
wages in respect of periods of employment 
prior to that date. The National Board 
would also be asked to examine any case 
where an employer paid his employees a 
Christmas or year-end bonus or gratuity 
which was obviously excessive. 

The Minister referred to the provisions of 
the Income War Tax Act which enabled him 
to disallow any expense wihch might be 
determined to be in excess of what is reason- 
able or normal for the business carried on 
by the taxpayer. Inasmuch as wages, salaries, 
fees or bonuses are items of expense, it 
becomes necessary to determine whether wage 
increases made after December 1, 1946, but 
with effect prior to that date, should be 
allowed. 

During the war years and since, income 
tax authorities have recognized the decisions 
of War Labour Boards as establishing lawful 
wage rates. Now that the Wage Control 
Order has been revoked employers are no 
longer required to obtain Board approval for 
wage and bonus adjustments. Many of these 
adjustments would no doubt be found 
permissible as deductible expenses for pur- 



poses of income tax, the Minister stated, as 
for example cases where negotiations had been 
in progress between an employer and his 
employees and an agreement reached but 
where time had not permitted application to 
a War Labour Board between the date of 
agreement and November 30. On the other 
hand, he pointed out there were cases in 
which an employer having previously been 
denied approval by a War Labour Board, now 
seeks to make wage adjustments retroactively. 
It was to assist the Department of National 
Revenue (Taxation Division) to determine 
what action should be taken in respect of 
permissible deductions that the assistance of 
the Department of Labour was being asked. 

In respect to salaries, providing they are 
commensurate with the services rendered, 
there will be no objection on the part of the 
Income Tax Division to reasonable increases 
effective as from dates subsequent to 30th 
November, 1946. Objection may be taken, 
however, to the payment of retroactive salary 
increases wihch have not been approved under 
the Wartime Salaries Order and which apply 
to pay periods prior to December 1, 1946, the 
minister stated. 

The procedural regulations 
Procedural of the Wartime Labour Re- 

regulations of lations Board (National) 
Wartime Labour were further amended on 
Relations Board December 13 so as to more 
amended clearly define the periods of 

time within which applica- 
tions for leave to appeal must be made to 
Provincial Boards and the National Board. 

The regulations, adopted on June 7, 1944, 
were previously amended on July 19, 1944, 
December 7, 1944, and May 22, 1945. 

Subsection one of Section seven of the Board 
regulations has now been repealed and the 
following substituted: 

(1) Any person directly affected by any de- 
cision or order of a Provincial Board may 
appeal to the National Board, if 

(a) the Provincial Board making such de- 
cision or order grants leave so to appeal, 
and the application for such leave to 
appeal has been received by the Provin- 
cial Board within thirty days of the date 
of the mailing of the decision or order 
by the Provincial Board; or 
(6) the National Board grants leave so to 
appeal, and the application for such leave 
to appeal has been received by the 
National Board within sixty days of the 
date of mailing of the decision or 
order by the Provincial Board. 

The amendment has been approved by the 
Minister of Labour as required under Section 
27 of the Wartime Labour Relations Regula- 
tions, P.C. 1003. 



1947] 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



The British Disabled Per- 
British factories sons Employment Corpora- 
tor employment tion, established 05' the 
of disabled Minister of Labour, pur- 

persons suant to the Disabled Per- 

sons Act, 1944, is establishing 
special factories, known as Remploy Factories, 
for the employment of severely disabled 
persons. 

The Corporation is a public, non-profit 
organization set up under the British Ministry 
of Labour to give effect to the provisions of 
the above mentioned legislation for the pro- 
curement or construction of facilities to meet 
the employment and training needs of regis- 
tered disabled persons who are precluded by 
their disability from undertaking employment 
or engaging in work on their own account 
except under special conditions. 

Four factories have already been opened, 
and it is anticipated that a total of eight 
will be in operation by April of this year, 
and a further forty in the ensuing twelve 
months. One of the presently functioning 
factories, employing ex-service men on card- 
board box-making since the first world war. 
was in operation when acquired. The majority, 
however, are to be built, or established on 
suitable premises. 

Each Remploy Factory operates as a separ- 
ate unit, subject to general control by the 
Corporation headquarters, which has charge 
of the supply of materials, training schemes 
and organization of the productive work. The 
Corporation exercises its control through re- 
gional executive officers in Scotland, Wales 
and the principal regions of England. Each 
factory has its own management and staff. 
It is planned to accommodate from 100 to 
300 workers in each of the projected structures. 

Over a million machinists 
British and related workers in the 

machinists United Kingdom have se- 

win 5-day cured a 5-day working week 

week as the result of an agree- 

ment reached in December 
by the Machinists Union and representatives 
of employers. 

Hours of work will be 44 a week; previously 
they were 47 for a 5^-day week. There will 
be no reduction in weekly pay. 

Union leaders had requested a 40-hour week, 
according to a dispatch appearing in the Nevj 
York Times, which states that the new 
schedule represents a compromise between 
the workers and the Government. The latter 
had taken the stand that Britain's need for pro- 
duction is so great at present and her labour 
force so small that a shorter work week is a 



luxurj' she cannot afford. Workers, on the 
other hand, have argued that a short work 
week makes for more efficient production, and 
that absenteeism for Saturday mornings has 
been higher than for any day in the week. 

Six trade unions in the 
Guaranteed British iron and steel in- 

work week dustry, representing 300,000 

in British workers, have won accept- 

steel industry ance of a guaranteed work 

week, according to an article 
in the New York Times for December 7. 

Under the plan full wages are guaranteed 
the men for at least four days of every week. 
If normal work is not available, employees will 
receive their full pay for doing "reasonable 
alternative work." 

A proviso in the agreement specifies that 
the guarantee will not apply when production 
is held up by a strike, or where any plant is 
made idle through avoidable absenteeism. 

The Canadian Textile Jour- 
Preventing nal in its issue of December 

industrial 27, by special permission, 

accidents quotes in full a report pre- 

pared by the Society of 
Dyers and Colourists (Great Britain), on 
"Accident Prevention in the Dyeing and Fin- 
ishing Industry". The arguments and advice 
presented in the report are summarized briefly 
as follows, and are applicable in most indus- 
trial plants: — 

(1) Appreciate the nature of the problem. 

(2) Study the accidents in your factory and 
apply the remedies indicated by that study. 

(3) Inspect your factory for hazards. Elimi- 
nate all that are humanly foreseeable as 
hazards. 

(4) Promote the comfort and well-being 
of the workers by due attention to heating, 
ventilation, lighting and amenities, for exam- 
ple, washing facilities, cloak-rooms and canteen. 

(5) Tackle the personal factor in accidents: 

(a) by convincing workers that safety has 
a vital place in factory organization; 

(b) by training new entrants thoroughly in 
the work and hazards — this applies with 
particular emphasis to young persons; 

(c) by propaganda and persuasion through 
Works Safety Committees, promoting 
safety by example and pressure of opin- 
ion in the factory; 

(d) by co-operation with H.M. Inspector 
and freely using his services for all 
manner of advice and help. 



79014—2 



8 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



JANUARY 



The wages arrangements 
Inquiry into and methods of organiza- 

conditions in tion of work in the cotton 

British cotton weaving industry of the 

weaving United Kingdom are to be 

reviewed by a Commission 
of five employers and five union representa- 
tives together with three independent members 
including the chairman. 

In making this announcement on November 
4, Mr. Isaacs, Minister of Labour, stated that 
the main object of the Commission was to 
simplify the wages structure and to make the 
industry more attractive. A similar Commis- 
sion for the cotton spinning industry, under 
the chairmanship of Mr. Justice Evershed, 
reported in October, 1945 (L.G. 1946, p. 152). 

An article in the November 
Purchasing issue of the United States 

power of Monthly Labour Review 

wages in U.S.A. describes the trends in 
urban wage rates and their 
purchasing power during the war and post- 
war periods. 

The article states that urban wage rates 
showed greater advances between October, 
1945, and April, 1946, than in any 6-month 
period since the beginning of World War II, 
and that at the end of August, 1946, they were 
still registering substantial gains each month. 
"Despite large increases in basic rates, how- 
ever, real wages still showed only moderate 
advances over January, 1941, levels, as a result 
of a 42-6 per cent rise in consumers' prices 
between January, 1941, and August, 1946. If 
measured from wartime peak levels, real 
weekly earnings show a decline despite the 
basic wage rate increases that have occurred 
during the reconversion period, whereas real 
wage rates show a small gain." 

(Real wages are defined in the article as 
representing the purchasing power of actual 
wages. " Real-wage indexes are computed by 
dividing actual-wage indexes by consumers' 
price indexes.") 

In August, 1946, average hourly wage rates 
in urban manufacturing industry were about 
56 per cent above the rates that prevailed 
prior to the wartime wage rise, in January, 
1941. Consumers' prices, on the other hand, 
increased 42-6 per cent during the same 
period. Thus the gain in real wage rates was 
only 9-4 per cent. 

Average weekly earnings rose more sharply 
during wartime than did hourly wage rates, 
according to the article, reaching a peak in 
January, 1945, which was 78-3 per cent above 
the January, 1941, base period. "This gain was 
the composite result of higher wage rates, a 
longer average work week (by 16-4 per cent), 
substantial amounts of premium pay for over- 



time and late-shift work, and the movement 
of large numbers, of workers from Lower-wage 
industries and areas to those where higher 
wages prevailed. 

"The months following January, 1945. how- 
ever, recorded a steady decline in weekly 
manufacturing earnings from the all-time high 
of that month, culminating in a sharp break in 
August, 1945, coincident with the end of the 
war with Japan. This decline reflected the 
influence of the above-named factors (except 
wage-rate increases) operating in reverse while 
reconversion to a peacetime economy got 
under way." 

By August, 1946, average weekly earnings 
were still 67-5 per cent higher than in January, 
1941, but the increase in consumers' prices 
reduced the increase in real weekly earnings 
to 17-5 per cent. 

The efforts of organized labour during the 
immediate post-war period, the article states, 
were directed towards achieving increases in 
wage rates that would maintain wartime levels 
of earnings under a shorter peacetime work 
week. The peak in wartime earnings had been 
reached in January, 1945. Between that date 
and August, 1946, wage rates increased an 
estimated 18-9 per cent, but average weekly 
earnings dropped 6-1 per cent. "Adjusted by 
consumers' prices, the real earnings for these 
two measures of wages became a 5-1 per cent 
advance and a 17-0 per cent decline, respec- 
tively." 

Legal claims for the ccllec- 
Portal-to-portal tion of retroactive portal- 
pay in United to-portal pay running into 
States billions of dollars may be 
filed eventually by unions 
in the United States, an article in the New 
York Times of December 22 reported. 

The issue of portal-to-portal pay was pre- 
cipitated when the Supreme Court of the 
United States ruled on June 10, 1946, in the 
case of the Mount Clemens Pottery Company, 
Mount Clemens, Michigan, that time spent 
by employees in walking to work on the em- 
ployer's premises, after a time clock had been 
punched, was working time within the mean- 
ing of the Fair Labour Standards Act (L.G., 
July, 1946, p. 999). The ruling also included 
as compensable under the legislation time used 
by employees for such purposes as putting on 
work clothes, greasing their arms and prepar- 
ing their equipment. Emphasis was placed 
upon the difference between walking time on 
the employer's property which was held man- 
datory upon the employee by the nature of 
the business and time spent travelling from 
the workers' homes to the factory. A petition 
for review of this decision was refused by the 
Court in October. 



1947] 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



9 



Subject to the varying statutes of limitation 
prevailing in different states, the ruling made 
liability retroactive to June 25, 1938, the date 
the Act was promulgated. 

The article indicated that portal- to-portal 
claims may be utilized as a strong bargaining 
point by unions in their future demands for 
wage increases. It stated that although it 
was questionable whether the wage increase, if 
agreed to, would be sufficient in amount to 
erase an employer's liability if it existed, it 
did provide a means for peaceful determination 
of the filed claim through simultaneous com- 
promise by the employer and the union over 
the amount of the claim and the wage increase 
demanded. 

The article cited an out-of-court settlement 
reached recently by the Dow Chemical Com- 
pany Midland, Michigan, and the United 
Mine Workers of America (AFL), as an ex- 
ample. The company agreed to pay the sum 
of $4,665,000 for back travel-pay, and the 
union withdrew its demand for a flat wage 
increase of 20 cents an hour advising its 
members that "they would receive the equiva- 
lent of an 11-cent increase through travel- 
time pay." 

The company further agreed to compute 
future travel-time on the basis of 27 minutes 
a day instead of 21, which had been the basis 
for computing the employer's past liability. 

The United Automobile Workers (CIO), the 
United Steel Workers (CIO), and the United 
Mine Workers of America (AFL) have filed 
suits against employers for payment of portal- 
to-portal pay, along with unions in logging, 
oil, rubber, glass, shipbuilding, meat packing 
and other industries, it has been reported. 

The second soft coal strike 
Soft-coal to occur in the United States 

strike in U.S. in 1946 took place during 

November and December 
when 400,000 soft-coal miners went out on 
strike for 17 days. 

The strike resulted from a dispute between 
the United Mine Workers of America (AFL) 
and the Government over a demand by the 
Union for a reduction of the 54-hour work 
week with the same take-home pay. The 
Secretary of the Interior, Mr. J. A. Krug, 
informed Mr. John L. Lewis, President of 
the UMW, that due to Government control 
of the mines, assumed as a result of the 
previous strike (L.G., June, 1946, p. 726), the 
wage and hour clause of the existing contract 
could not be reopened. He expressed readi- 
could not be reopened. He expressed readi- 
ness to consider any grievance arising under 
the contract but insisted that its terms were 
binding for the duration of Government 
control. 

79014— 2£ 



Mr. Lewis subsequently notified Secretary 
Krug that should the demand not be granted 
the Union would regard the contract as 
terminated at the expiry date, November 15, 
which was tantamount to a strike call because 
of the miners' principle of "no-contract, 
no-work". 

Notices were posted in the mines by the 
Government advising miners that the mines 
would be kept open. At the same time a 
temporary injunction requiring Mr. Lewis to 
withdraw his termination notice, thus can- 
celling the strike, or be held in contempt of 
court was issued by the District Court of 
Columbia upon petition by the Justice 
Department. The petition held that the 
breaching of the contract was interference 
with the "sovereign" functions of the United 
States and coercion of the miners to strike. 

On November 21 the miners walked out. 
Mr. Lewis and his legal aides disputed the 
authority of the injunction, claiming that it 
contravened the terms of the Norris- 
LaGuardia Act which denied to the courts 
the right to issue injunctions in labour 
disputes except in cases involving Government 
enterprises, railway workers and teachers. 
Temporary government control did not bring 
the mines under the cited exceptions of the 
Act, Mr. Lewis maintained. 

This view was opposed by the Justice 
Department which held that temporary 
control did bring the mines under the specific 
exclusions of the Act and made its terms 
inapplicable in this case. 

As a consequence of the strike, Justice 
T. Allan Goldsborough of the District Court 
of Columbia promptly directed Mr. Lewis to 
appear and answer the contempt charges 
which carried penalties of both fine and 
imprisonment. As a result of the trial the 
Judge upheld the Government's interpretation 
and found both Mr. Lewis and the Union in 
contempt of court in ignoring the restraining 
order. Fines of $10,000 and $3,500,000 were 
assessed against Mr. Lewis and the Union 
respectively. In addition the Coal Mines 
Administrator approved numerous applications 
from soft-coal operators to fine individual 
miners $1 to $2 a day for violation of contract. 

Payment of the fine was postponed pending 
disposition of an appeal filed by the Union 
and its posting of a bond. 

On December 7 Mr. Lewis announced the 
end of the strike and the miners returned to 
work. He announced that the reason for his 
action was his "respect due the dignity" of 
the Supreme Court so that in its deliberation 
of the case the Court could be "free from 
public pressure superimposed by . . . economic 



10 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



Hearing of the appeal by the Supreme 
Court was scheduled to commence on 
January 14. 

The United States National 
U.S. National Association of Manufac- 

Association of turers in its fifty-first annual 

Manufacturers convention held in New 

adopts labour York City during December 

relations program adopted a labour relations 
program which was cited 
officially as an attempt to curb union abuses 
that are detrimental to the national economy 
and to encourage legislation and policies to 
enable the free enterprise system to function 
most efficiently. 

In broad terms, the association called for 
a balancing of union and management respon- 
sibility; high wages based on high produc- 
tivity, with incentives to encourage output; 
working conditions that safeguard the health, 
dignity and self-respect of the employee; 
employment that is stabilized to the greatest 
possible degree ; and co-operation between the 
policies, problems and prospects of the 
business. 

A nine-point set of principles on labour 
relations, intended as a basis for revision of 
the Wagner Act, demanded in brief: (1) 
provisions to compel unions as well as 
employers to bargain in good faith; (2) 
provisions to require unions as well as 
employers to adhere to the terms of collective 
agreements; (3) outlawing of the closed shop 
and other forms of compulsion with respect 
to union membership; (4) prohibition of mass 
picketing; (5) provisions eliminating legal 
protection of strikes on any issues not 
relating to wages, hours or working condi- 
tions; (6) exemption of foremen from 
collective bargaining; (7) a minimum of 
government intervention in labour disputes 
and avoidance of compulsory arbitration; (8) 
legal protection of employers as well as 
unions in the right to express their positions 
in labour disputes and denial of protection to 
strikes not called by a majority vote in secret 
ballot; and (9) an end to "monopolistic 
practices in restraint of trade" by unions as 
well as business, which it is believed may be 
interpreted as applying to industry-wide 
collective bargaining. 

The Labour-Management 
U.S. committee Advisory Committee to the 
warns against Conciliation Service of the 

compulsory United States Department 

arbitration of Labour, issued a warning 

during December that the 
use of compulsory arbitration or "super- 
machinery" to settle industrial disputes might 
prove frustrating rather than conducive to 
industrial peace. 



The Committee, established pursuant to a 
recommendation of the Labour-Management 
Conference convented by President Truman 
late in 1945 (L.G., Dec, 1945, p. 1774), is com- 
posed of four members chosen equally by the 
CTO and AFL and four chosen by the United 
States Chamber of Commerce and the 
National Association of Manufacturers. 

Belief in the operation of free collective 
bargaining was expressed by the Committee 
which recommended restricting the role of 
the Government in negotiations to voluntary 
mediation through the Conciliation Service. 
The Committee noted that the Service had 
facilitated the determination of more than 
13,000 industrial disputes during the first year 
following V-J day and urged that its proven 
effectiveness be more widely utilized in the 
future. 

To supplement the work of conciliators in 
special cases, the Committee recommended: 

(1) Establishment of a panel of men 
nationally known for labour relations work to 
act as special conciliators in major disputes. 

(2) Tri-partite arbitration, with labour and 
industry panels to aid conciliators. 

(3) Voluntary arbitration to resolve some 
issues in basic contract terms when necessary, 
and to settle disputes over the interpretation 
or application of the terms of agreements. It 
was recommended that clauses providing for 
the arbitration of such disputes be written 
into contracts. 

(4) Establishment of emergency boards in 
cases of national importance where normal 
mediation efforts have failed and where the 
parties consent. The boards would be 
appointed from outside the federal govern- 
ment. They would conduct hearings and 
publish findings. 

Until fairly recent years 
Unionization of collective bargaining has not 
professional been a live issue among 

engineers and foremen, office workers and 

chemists professional employees. 

However, the long depres- 
sion of the thirties, the rapid growth of labour 
unions and the failure of salaried groups to 
maintain their living standards in the face of 
rising costs during the war years, have all 
influenced such workers in becoming union 
conscious. 

This new development in trade unionism 
prompted the Industrial Relations Coun- 
sellors, Inc., of New York to make an 
intensive study of certain phases of the 
"uniionization of professional engineers and 
chemists". The study, embodied in a brochure 
of some 50 pages, attempts to clarify the 
issues involved in collective bargaining with 
these groups and the problems thereby posed 



1947] 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



11 



for the employers and the professional societies 
concerned. 

The investigation is concerned only with 
engineers and chemists who are engaged in 
work that is almost solely creative in char- 
acter and requiring mental rather than physical 
effort. The "professional" engineer is thus 
distinguished from the sub-professional tech- 
nician, who normally performs work of a 
standardized or mechanical character under 
the supervision of a professional person. 

The author of the brochure, Mr. Herbert R. 
Northrup, has taught labour economics at 
Columbia and New York Universities and is 
now professor of industrial relations at the 
New York School of Social Work. Paper- 
bound copies may be obtained from Industrial 
Relations Counsellors, Inc., R.K.O. Building, 
Rockefeller Centre, New York 20, N.Y., at 
$1.50 a copy. 

The International Ladies 
AFL union Garment Workers Union 

creates officers' (AFL) has established a 
pension fund retirement fund for its paid 

officers, which will begin to 
pay benefits January 1, 1949, and at present 
will cover about 700 persons. 

In general, two-thirds of the cost of the 
fund will be borne by the union and one- 
third by the officers. Each officer of an 
affiliated local or joint board will contribute 
5 per cent of his weekly pay; the local union 
will contribute 7£ per cent; and the inter- 
national office, 2\ per cent. It appears from 
reports that the full 10 per cent will be paid 
by the headquarters office for those on its 
own staff. 

Benefits will be paid to male officers 
retiring at sixty and to women retiring at 
fifty-five. The pensions will be geared to 
length of service, with 2 per cent of normal 
salary allowed for each year up to a 
maximum of 50 per cent for twenty-five years. 
Persons under the plan who leave voluntarily 
or are voted out of office before the retire- 
ment age will receive a full refund of their 
own contributions, and a similar refund will 
apply for families of persons who die before 
retirement. Persons who suffer total dis- 
ability will receive their retirement allowance 
at once without regard to age. 

The union is at present seeking an employer- 
financed pension plan to cover all its 350,000 
members. 

Mr. Edward Corsi, New 
New York York State Industrial Corn- 

State to missioner, has announced 

revise the appointment of three 

minimum wages new wages boards to recom- 
mend revision of the 
minimum rates for women and minors 
employed in the hotel, restaurant, and laundrj' 



industries. Wages boards for the beauty 
service, confectionery, and cleaning and dyeing 
industries will be appointed shortly. The 
minimum rates in effect in these industries 
were established in 1938. The minimum in 
laundries is $14 for a 40-hour week, in hotels 
and restaurants, 20 cents an hour for 
waitresses plus meals and tips, and for other 
workers 30 cents plus meals, or 36 cents 
without meals. 

Mr. Corsi also indicated his intention to 
ask the State Legislature next January to 
revoke the exemption of domestic workers so 
that they, too, may be covered by minimum- 
wage laws. 

After public hearings and investigations 
which will likely take at least two months, 
the wages boards, representing employers, 
workers and the public, will recommend new 
minimum rates to the Industrial Commis- 
sioner who will hold more public hearings 
before issuing Wage Orders. 

The question of the revival 
Revival of of German co-operatives 

co-operatives was raised in the British 

in Germany House of Commons early 

in December and brought 
the following reply from a member of the 
Cabinet, as reported in Co-operative News, 
for December 14. 

"Since the German co-operative movement 
was revived in February of this year (1946), 
62 societies have been approved and the 
formation of another 26 is under consideration. 

"To help the movement, Nazi discrim- 
inatory measures have been revoked, the 
Germans have been invited to set up an 
advisory body to assist in the foundation of 
new societies, and an expert adviser on 
co-operative matters has been appointed to 
the staff of the Control Commission. 

"A co-operative institute for applied 
economics and co-operative training centres 
have been opened and a co-operative news- 
paper licensed. Representatives of both the 
International Co-operative Alliance and the 
British Co-operative Union have visited the 
zone and given useful advice." 

The United Nations General 
ILO becomes Assembly, in the closing 

associated with hours of its first session at 
United Nations New York, voted approval 
of an agreement bringing 
the International Labour Organization into 
official relationship with the United Nations. 
Drafted last May by negotiating committees 
of the Economic and Social Council of the 
United Nations and the Governing Body of 
the ILO, the agreement was approved by the 
General Conference of the ILO in Montreal 



12 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



on October 2 (L.G, Oct., 1946, p. 1394). The 
Economic and Social Council recommended 
it for the approval of the General Assembly 
on June 21. 

Addressing the Assembly after its approval 
had been given, Mr. E. J. Phelan, Director- 
General of the International Labour Office, 
declared that co-operation between the two 
organizations was "of the very essence of the 
world's efforts to achieve peace, production 
and prosperity." He added that the smooth 
working of the agreement was guaranteed by 
the excellent relations which had already been 
established between the organizations. 

He also pointed out that the ILO retained 
"all those fundamental characteristics of our 



unique tripartite constitution which have been 
our strength in the past and are the promise 
of our success in the future." 



At the National Conference on Labour 
Legislation in Washington, D.C., December 2-4, 
1946, improvements in State labour legislation 
were discussed and certain policies recom- 
mended. On the invitation of the United 
States Secretary of Labor, Mr. L. B. Schwel- 
lenbach, the Department of Labour of Canada 
was represented by Mr. M. M. Maclean, 
Director of Industrial Relations, and Mr. Eric 
Stangroom, who attended as observers. A 
short summary of the proceedings will appear 
in the February Labour Gazette. 



Guaranteed Annual Wage in United States 

Committee Issues Preliminary Report 



T) RELIMINARY findings of a survey under- 
-*- taken at the direction of the late 
President Roosevelt early in 1945, into the 
question of the guaranteed annual wage in 
United States industry, were made public by 
the Office of War Mobilization and Recon- 
version last month. 

The committee, headed by Mr. Murray W. 
Latimer, which conducted the study, was con- 
cerned with arriving at some conclusions 
regarding the experience, achievements and 
possible applications of the guaranteed annual 
wage with a view to providing information 
which would facilitate consideration of the 
subject by management and labour. 

On the basis of its survey of 196 plans in 
operation during 1946 covering some 70,000 
workers, the committee found that the average 
costs of guaranteeing substantially all em- 
ployees full-time wages for a year varied from 
1-3 per cent of actual payroll in a paper 
company to 20 per cent in a steel company, 
in six establishments surveyed, but that in the 
latter case average costs could be maintained 
below 6 per cent of actual payroll by limiting 
maximum liability in any one year to 10 per 
cent of a year's payroll. 

It found the mortality rate of the plans to 
be low. Of 62 plans instituted but discontinued 
in the United States, exclusive of the 196 
functioning in 1946, 40 per cent were with- 
drawn during the peak employment conditions 
of 1941 and a comparable proportion were 
abandoned when unemployment insurance was 
introduced. 

Noting that most plans had persisted suc- 
cessfully through depressions, the report 
pointed out that incurred costs were in part, 
deductible from taxes, and in the event of 
there being no taxable profit the Government 
had statutorily agreed to assume a part of the 
expense of instituting and maintaining guaran- 
teed wages. However, it cautioned that under 
conditions of wide fluctuations in production 
and employment adoption of the guaranteed 
wage might not be feasible; it emphasized the 
importance of regularizing production and 
work conditions previous to introducing such 
a scheme. 

The committee expressed the view that a 
guaranteed wage is not a panacea for economic 
insecurity, but that it does provide assistance 
in stabilizing the economy by stabilizing the 
income of the wage earner and hence consumer 
purchasing power. The preliminary report con- 
tained no specific legislative proposals but 
included several recommendations intended to 
encourage the growth of the guaranteed wage. 



13 



They included: (1) revision of income tax laws 
to permit the total cost to the employer to 
be deducted from corporate taxes; (2) modifi- 
cation of the United States Fair Labour 
Standards Act to raise the number of hours 
that may be worked annually without over- 
time pay; and (3) amendment of the Social 
Security Act and of state unemployment com- 
pensation laws to permit, during periods of 
unemployment, the receipt of benefits by an 
employee covered by an annual guaranteed 
wage while receiving supplementary payments 
from his employer to meet the amount of the 
guarantee. 

The report attributed the present demand 
for the guaranteed annual wage, in part to the 
sequence of economic events since the first 
world war. It stated that: 

"During and for a brief period following the 
first world war, the level of economic activity 
reached new and unprecedented heights. Fol- 
lowing a severe but short-lived depression, a 
still higher level of activity was achieved in 
the twenties, followed by the most severe 
depression of modern industrial history. 

"The demand for wage guarantees is a 
response to experience. On the one hand, the 
response regards the high levels of economic 
activity achieved as proving that large pro- 
duction and security earnings can be main- 
tained; on the other hand, it regards the 
economic fluctuations of the past as establish- 
ing the need for assurance that earnings and 
living standards will be maintained. The de- 
mand for wage guarantees is essentially a 
demand for the security of substantial and 
regular earnings." 

The report held that unemployment insur- 
ance was not an effective means for providing 
economic security to workers. The amount 
and duration of payments were held insufficient 
to meet workers' requirements during periods 
of unemployment: also, it indicated that the 
present level of insurance benefits had failed 
to induce employers to stabilize employment. 
Instead, experience rating has encouraged 
employers to seek means to avoid paying 
contributions and has produced competition 
among the States to lower contributions and 
benefit standards. 

"On the other hand ... it is quite clear that 
widespread wage guarantee systems can make 
a substantial contribution to the stabilization 
of the economy through the stabilization of 
wage-earner income, and, hence consumer 
expenditures", the report declared. 



Human Motivation in Industry 



THERE is growing dissatisfaction amongst 
executives, with traditional concepts of 
the motives or forces which affect the activi- 
ties of the individual in industry, according 
to an article in the November-December issue 
of Industrial Welfare, the publication of the 
British Industrial Welfare Society. The article 
is a reprint of a paper delivered by Mr. J. D. 
Sutherland, Ph.D., M.B., D.P.M., to the 
Society's Annual Conference during Sep- 
tember, 1946. 

Mr. Sutherland contends that the generally 
held psychological theory about man as an 
industrial worker can be described as a 
"rabble hypothesis" which conceives the 
worker as an individual functioning inde- 
pendently within an "unorganized aggregate". 
The corollary derived from this theory is that 
"economic man" is primarily influenced by 
rewards and offerings fashioned for the 
individual whose motives are activated 
primarily by the desire for personal 
monetary reward. 

This theory, the article contends, has long 
been regarded as an oversimplification by 
many responsible people in industry and by 
economists. Investigations have found that 
upon query workers place the actual wage 
figure at a low level of importance in the 
achievement of major satisfactions in their 
work, once a certain stage has been passed. 
"Security, opportunities for development, and 
a square deal as a human being, came higher 
in all cases." 

Despite the wide area of appreciation of 
these factors the persistence of the old theory 
in modern industrial society is indicated by 
the extent of the use in industry of the word 
incentive which implies that the recognition 
of work, as a social act, is not a character- 
istic of the worker and that a bait has to 
be held out to him, the article states. 

It likens such an approach to exhorting a 
donkey to greater effort in drawing a load by 
dangling a carrot in front of it. Man, unlike 
the donkey, it states, gets tired of bigger and 
better carrots and stops to inquire into the 
purposes and nature of his job and into his 
relationship with the directors and fellow 
members of his working team. 

Mr. Sutherland criticizes the familiar expres- 
sion that "people would enjoy a life in which 
they did not have to work" as humorous 
comment rather than a psychological reality. 
"We know that to work is to live. The 
degenerative effects of unemployment on the 



individual are a pathetic confirmation of this 
statement. The working effort of people is 
governed by the intuitive appreciation of the 
give and take process, and unless this is felt 
to be satisfactory, the effects of the frustration 
of the need to be a participant in this basic 
process become manifest." 

Mr. Sutherland regards the persistence of 
this frustration as profoundly inimical to the 
performance of the worker. Failure to resolve 
the need for status and a position of dignity 
in the basic industrial process induces regres- 
sive tendencies which are injurious both to 
the worker himself and industrial develop- 
ment generally. The major need in obviating 
this frustration is to "belong to a group in 
which the individual feels he has a part in 
deciding the common destiny. When he feels 
identified with his fellows in a common task, 
his performance is capable of really great 
levels." This implies that the effort and 
efficiency of the individual worker is governed 
by the levels established by the group of 
which he is a member and is not, generally 
speaking, the result of purely personal con- 
siderations. Thus the problem of motivation 
or incentive in industry is better thought of 
as a problem of morale in working groups 
than in terms of rewards for individual 
workers, it is contended. 

Morale is described as being generally 
regarded as something a leader gives to a 
group. In democratic societj', the article 
states, a leader is "a social role", not a certain 
kind of man. Many kinds of men can fulfil 
leadership roles at different times and in 
different circumstances as contrasted to the 
concepts underlying the idea of "leadership" 
which ascribes super powers to the leader and 
mistrust of the sense of responsibility, the 
integrity and the capacity of the working 
man. 

Mr. Sutherland states that studies con- 
ducted recently into the behaviour of people 
in groups indicate that autocratic leadership, 
even if benevolent, engenders greater hostility 
than does democratic leadership. 

"These experiments are intense^ interest- 
ing," for they show the beginning of proof 
that (industrial) democracy is not a vague 
aspiration but a powerful psychological factor 
in the degree to which individuals can be 
activated — and that democrac}' is the optimal 
situation for effective work." 

Mr. Sutherland's thesis holds that unless 
management is prepared to believe in. and be 



14 



HUMAN MOTIVATION IN INDUSTEY 



15 



convinced about, the need of workers to 
participate in a common task and desist from 
traditional attitudes of individualism and 
"fuehrership" little can be done. When 
democratic belief in the ability of the 
"common man" exists in the board room and 
in top management "its effect will be felt 
right to the bottom." It is emphasized how- 
ever that "democratization" does not imply 
submitting management itself to election by 
workers. Present problems of output in 
industry will be much more successfully 
attacked in proportion as we forget about 
"incentives" and "rewards" and tackle the 
human relations inside groups and between 
groups, the article maintains. "Social scien- 
tists are beginning to learn ways of approach- 
ing these problems and they must collaborate 
with those responsible for the running of 



industry in clearing some of the obscurity and 
confusion that have characterized our theories 
about motivation in work. 

"Experimental work on morale in groups has 
already shown that output is best when the 
morale in the working group is based on 
democratic participation by all members. 

The role of management in the industrial 
group in which there is democratic participa- 
tion is no less responsible than in groups 
wherein management is autocratic. Indeed, 
the democratic society delegates more serious 
responsibilities to its managers than does any 
other form of society. One of the greatest 
immediate needs to-day is therefore an 
adequate appreciation by management of the 
full nature of its responsibilities and an 
understanding of human relations." 



Economic and Social Research in United Kingdom 
More Adequate Provision Recommended by Committee 



RESEARCH into social and economic ques- 
tions, both within the machinery of 
Government and in the Universities, should 
be more adequately provided for is the firm 
opinion of a Committee which was appointed 
by the late Coalition Government in the 
United Kingdom to consider the existing 
provision for this purpose. The Chairman of 
the Committee was Sir John Clapham, and 
its report of June, 1946, (Cmd. 6868) was 
completed, except for minor details, before his 
death. 

No exact definition of the fields of research 
was laid down by the Committee but it was 
agreed that the study of social and economic 
questions involved Economics and Economic 
History, Sociology, Anthropology, Social Psy- 
chology, Political Science, Demography, Eco- 
nomic and Social Statistics, and, probably, cer- 
tain branches of Medical Statistics and Law. 

As regards the Government and research 
in economic and social problems, the Com- 
mittee pointed out: 

It is a platitude that modern industrial 
communities rest on a knowledge of the 
subject matter of the natural sciences. It 
should be also a platitude that their smooth 
running and balance rest upon a knowledge 
of the subject matter of the social sciences. 
Social services cannot be properly planned 
without a knowledge of social needs and 
social responses. Economic policy cannot be 
properly reviewed without a knowledge of 
economic quantities and economic institutions. 

It is inherent in the nature of things that 
governments should be involved in research 
into social and economic questions, not only 
indirectly by way of grants to universities 
and research institutions, but also directly 
by way of activities which they themselves 
carry out. Whatever value may be attached 
to the increase of knowledge as such, in 
modern countries the exigencies of day to 
day administration necessitate the collection 
of exact information on a vast range of mat- 
ters relevant to the social sciences. The census, 
the census of production, the statistics of em- 
ployment and unemployment, cost of living 
figures, and health statistics are all examples 
of bodies of information which have come 
into being, primarily with some immediate 
practical need in view, but which neverthe- 
less are among the chief sources of the raw 
material of more general speculations. And 
indeed it is clear that, while the increase of 
facilities for independent research must 
always be a prime objective, much of the 
collection of material necessary for the estab- 
lishment of correct views on social and 
economic questions, can only be satisfactorily 
performed by governments. 



To survey and advise upon research work in 
Government Departments, the Committee 
recommended that a standing Interdepart- 
mental Economic and Social Research Com- 
mittee should be set up. This committee would 
bring together representatives of Government 
departments, including the Central Statistical 
Office and the Economic Section of the 
Cabinet Office, and outside experts in the 
leading branches of social and economic 
research. The committee would assume respon- 
sibility for bringing to the notice of depart- 
ments the potential value for research purposes 
of the material they collect and for suggesting 
new methods and areas of collection. The 
Clapham Committee believed it 

highly desirable that Government depart- 
ments which collect and analyse material 
relevant to social and economic research 
should be in continuous contact with out- 
side experts who can keep them aware of 
the needs which are arising in the specula- 
tive branches of the field and who can 
assist in assessing the value and possible 
uses of material which is already being col- 
]ected. It is equally desirable that there 
should be continuous contact between the 
relevant divisions within the different depart- 
ments, not only to avoid overlapping but 
also to ensure that the potential value for 
research purposes of the material available is 
exploited from every point of view. 

In the opinion of the Committee, 

the exigencies of war and a gradual enlarge- 
ment of views as to what is essential as a 
basis for running the complex machinery 
of a modern state, have brought about 
changes, both in the machinery for collecting 
information of this sort and in the provision 
of organs for its systematic survey . . . we 
are satisfied that, unless present arrangements 
and plans are upset in some future economy 
campaign, the provision for research within 
the governmental machine is much more 
likely to be hampered in the future by the 
lack of availability of properly trained staff 
than by the lack of realization of the im- 
portance of the work to be done ... If the 
axe of extraordinary economy is once more 
wielded in Whitehall, [these developments] 
will not be regarded as among the unessen- 
tial frills which can be offered as a token 
sacrifice to an uninformed public opinion. 

The Committee stresses 

the great unwisdom of cheese-paring finan- 
cial measures in a sphere where proper pro- 
vision was likely to produce a yield of in- 
creased efficiency probably very many times 
greater in cash value alone than the small 
additional outlay required. 



16 



SOCIAL RESEARCH IN UNITED KINGDOM 



17 



In regard to research in the universities, the 
Committee, considering the existing provision 
as insufficient both as regards staff and the 
resources to enable the staff to pursue its 
researches, recommended that favourable con- 
sideration be given by the Government to 
increasing the university grant with a view 
to strengthening developments conducive to 
the spread of research into economic and 
social questions, not only through the pro- 
vision of more chairs and other teaching 
posts but also through much more liberal 
provision for libraries, calculating machines, 
computing assistance and similar facilities. 
This policy would ensure increased provision 
of resources on "a permanent and routine 
basis" with adequate regard to the needs of 
particular branches of study. The Committee 
recommended that the University Grants 
Committee be asked to consider the establish- 
ment of a sub-committee to advise on matters 
relating to the social sciences in the same 
manner as the Medical Advisory Sub-Com- 
mittee advises concerning medical education 
and research. 

The Clapham Committee, however, is care- 
ful to emphasize that the initiation of de- 
velopments in research in the universities 
should remain with the universities. It ex- 
presses its appreciation of the funds which 
have been made available from private 
sources but it considers it essential that 
routine allocation of funds should be made 
for important branches of knowledge. 

Distinguishing between research in the 
natural and in the social sciences, the Com- 
mittee noted that public recognition of the 
importance of research in the natural sciences 
has resulted in systematic provision for such 
research "on a fairly extensive scale" but in 
the social sciences the provision is "much less 
satisfactory". 

The social scientist may not need the expen- 
sive laboratory facilities which hi? colleague 
in the natural sciences finds necessary. But 
he needs library facilities which are even 
more expensive, and his work in the field, 



collecting information, and in the computing 
room, assembling and analysing what has 
been collected, needs outlays of comparable 
magnitude. 

Further, as to the men to do the jobs, the 
Committee emphasized that while more ade- 
quate provision should be made 

for research in the universities ... by the 
extension of grants for post-graduate student- 
ships -and fellowships which permit young 
men and women fresh from their studies, to 
devote two or three years to research 
activities . . . even more important is pro- 
vision which gives experienced scholars suf- 
ficient freedom of mind and time to make 
their distinctive contributions. Specialist re- 
searches can indeed be carried out by the 
young scholar. But, whatever may be the 
case in the natural sciences, in the social 
sciences the difficult and necessary work of 
systematising the results of several lines of 
enquiry calls for a maturity of mind and 
experience of life which young scholars are 
unlikely to possess. 

Proposals for the establishment of an official 
Social Science Research Department or Coun- 
cil, parallel with the Department of Scientific 
and Industrial Research or the Medical Re- 
search Council, which would distribute grants 
and co-ordinate research activities were con- 
sidered by the Clapham Committee but not 
approved. The Committee believed that any 
advantages likely to accrue from such an of- 
ficial department would be secured by carrying 
out their recommendations and many disad- 
vantages would be avoided. They considered 
that the parallelism suggested between the 
present needs of the social and natural sciences 
was ill-founded. The social science need at the 
present time is for stronger staffs and provision 
for routine research. They do not wish to see 
the best men diverted from doing research to 
co-ordinating research. While more collabora- 
tion among social scientists is considered 
highly desirable, the limiting feature appeared 
to the Committee to be not the absence of 
an external council but of a sufficiency of col- 
laborators. More permanent workers needed 
to be released from heavy teaching and 
university duties. 



Southern Labour in the United States 



T N the United States the position of labour 
-*■ in the South is improving steadily in 
relation to the rest of the country but the 
rate of progress remains slow and unspectacu- 
lar, a report published in the October issue 
of the Monthly Labour Review, a publica- 
tion of the United States Department of 
Labour, finds. 

Composed of a series of seven articles 
dealing with the social, economic, and trade 
union aspects of labour, the report is designed 
to contribute to the knowledge of labour 
conditions in the thirteen states which com- 
pose the region popularly referred to in the 
United States as the South. It warns, however, 
that the contents are not to be regarded as 
exhaustive. 

Labour Supply 

Manufacturing in the South previous to the 
war was largely confined to textiles, lumber, 
furniture, tobacco and petroleum. This nar- 
row range of productive activity, with its 
accompanying scarcity of employment oppor- 
tunities, resulted in the migration of Southern 
workers to the extensively industrialized 
regions in the north and west. During the 
decade from 1920 to 1930 the excess of 
migrants leaving the South over the number 
of immigrants coming into the area amounted 
to 130,000 annually. During the war period 
the rate rose to 300,000 annually. 

The introduction pointed out that the South 
has historically been the region of a high birth 
rate. This has produced a condition whereby 
these migrants, after their unproductive years 
devoted to education and work-experience 
necessary to make a direct contribution to the 
output of the region, left for other areas which 
reaped "the fruit of this nurture and training." 

Regional dependency on agriculture is being 
gradually reduced, the survey found. It stated 
that although the major problems were 
unlikely to be resolved in the near future, the 
war had apparently "strengthened a tendency 
of the industrial structure of the South to 
broaden, partly as a result of the rise of 
essentially new industries and partly from 
decentralizing tendencies elsewhere." If an 
expanded industrialization program does occur, 
based upon the new war-built plants and the 
skills of the wartime force of factory workers, 
the rate of annual migration from the region 
would be substantially reduced. Nevertheless, 
the survey concluded, the South would con- 
tinue to export labour for some time. 



Income 

On the question of income, the report 
stated that "while per capita income in the 
South is low compared with the average for 
the country a definite and encouraging up- 
ward trend has however, been evident in 
recent years." This trend was described as 
reflecting the changing structure of the 
economy which was decreasing the relative 
importance of agriculture and raising the 
status of manufacturing. 

"Per capita income in the Southern states 
rose from 55 per cent of the national average 
in 1929 to 69 per cent in 1945. Between these 
dates income in the aggregate nearly doubled 
in the South and the region's share of the 
country's total income increased considerably." 

Trade Unions 

Historically, trade unionism in the South 
has reflected the strength and weakness of 
organized labour in the country as a whole, 
the survey found; its relative size, scope and 
structure has varied directly with the changes 
which occurred in the national movement in 
different periods. Nevertheless greater 
obstacles confronted Southern unionism than 
were encountered in other parts of the 
country. 

Some of these retarding factors, given below, 
are not to be assumed as exclusive to the 
South. "They exist in some measure else- 
where in the Nation." 

The Southern labour force, composed essen- 
tially of people directly off, or one generation 
removed from, the land has lacked the habits 
and attitudes necessary for sustained collective 
action which underlies strong unionism. 

Many groups of workers have been difficult 
to organize because of the pressure on 
industrial-job opportunities of "large numbers 
of desperately poor people from the agricul- 
tural areas." 

The existence of company-owned towns has 
seriously impeded the advance of unionism. 
The article stated that this factor has been 
highly important in the textile industry, coal 
mining and some other industries. Also the 
dispersion of industry over wide geographical 
areas has made the process of organization 
more difficult. 

The bi-racial character of the Southern 
labour supply, with its large and permanent 
Negro segment, has enabled labour opponents 



18 



SOUTHERN LABOUR IN THE UNITED STATES 



19 



to use race prejudice in breaking strikes and 
keeping the workers divided along racial lines. 
Although some unions practise racial dis- 
crimination, others, the report said, "have 
dons a magnificent job in cementing union 
bonds among members of the two races." 

In contrast to these adverse factors, however, 
public opinion is becoming more tolerant 
toward union organization and the Southern 
working class is becoming more mature and 
acquiring more experience and confidence, the 
survey reported. 

Another factor favouring union growth, it 
found, was the existence of the National 
Labour Relations Act which made collective 
bargaining by employers mandatory and 



deprived many of anti-union weapons through 
the definition and enjoinment of unfair labour 
practices. 

A final factor favouring the growth of 
unionism the report held, was the existence 
nationally of the strongest trade-union move- 
ment in history. Any general organizing cam- 
paign will likely be better staffed, and better 
financed than earlier ones. "A new chapter in 
the history of trade-unionism began in the 
spring of 1946, when both the CIO and the 
AFL announced plans for major organizing 
campaigns in the South. Both organizations 
reported progress by late summer, but no 
appraisal is yet possible of the results tc 
extend labour organization in the region." 



Industrial Executives Hold Conference at Dalhousie University* 



"TV/I" ORE than fifty industrial executives and 
-L* -*- personnel managers from all parts of the 
Maritimes gathered at Dalhousie University 
on November 22-23 for the Eighth Annual 
Industrial Relations Conference of the Mari- 
time Bureau of Industrial Relations. The 
agenda was mainly concerned with problems 
of the present reconversion period. Canada's 
economic position, the employment outlook, 
the merits and demerits of the Dominion's 
social security program and recent develop- 
ments of modern industrial relations policies, 
were among the subjects under discussion. 

First of the speakers was Mr. R. A. McEach- 
ern, Editor the Financial Post of Toronto, who 
discussed the far-reaching changes in indus- 
trial organization, the tremendous increase in 
productivity, and the technological improve- 
ments, characteristic of modern industry. He 
pointed to the social lag which has arisen 
because our social institutions cannot be 
quickly enough adapted to the rapid techno- 
logical changes which characterize modern 
industry. As a civilization, the speaker declared, 
we are still in the process of getting adjusted 
to the revolution started long ago by men 
like Isaac Watt and Thomas Edison. 

Employment Conditions in Maritimes 

Work of the National Employment Service 
was described by Mr. Leo Curry, Regional 
Director of Employment, Moncton, who said 
that the overall employment picture in Canada 
is good, though unemployment is evident in 
some industries. In the Maritimes, the employ- 
ment situation is disturbed in four trouble 
spots — the Sydney and New Glasgow-Pictou 
areas (coal and steel localities) and Saint 
John and Halifax (shipping), and new industry 
will have to be developed to take up the em- 
ployment slack. 

Significant for future labour-management 
relations was the address of Nova Scotia's 
Labour Minister, Hon. L. D. Currie, who called 
for the three-fold co-operation of labour, 
management and government when jurisdic- 
tion over labour matters is returned to the 
provinces by the federal government next 
spring. It is hoped to create through Canada, 
the Minister said, a body of case law fo- 
labour disputes, on which the legislatures 
and courts of various provinces can base their 
legislation and decisions. 

Mr. R. Burns, Chief Administrative Officer 
for Family Allowances, Ottawa, spoke to the 
delegates about Canada's social security pro- 
gram which he described as "well advanced, 
but not yet finished". He stressed particularly 

*Report by Dr. L. Richter, Managing Director, Mari- 
time Bureau of Industrial Relations. 



the value of Family Allowances in giving 
children a better standard of living. "Canada's 
children are her greatest heritage", he de- 
clared. "Without an increasing birthrate 
Canada can never grow or prosper. Our objec- 
tive is that today's children be nurtured and 
developed for Canada's tomorrow." 

The dangers of fallacious economic reason- 
ing were brought to the attention of delegates 
by Mr. Stuart Armour, of Gilbert Jackson 
Associates, Toronto. There are a number of 
fallacies widely believed in by Canadians, 
Mr. Armour asserted. For example, that the 
national economies of Canada and the United 
States are alike; that Canada can adopt the 
same or an even more comprehensive social 
security program than the United States; that 
Canadians are masters of their own economic 
destinies. He continued, with one-third of her 
national income depending on export mar- 
kets, and with her relatively small population, 
Canada has to shape her own social policies. 

Suggested Solutions for Economic Problems 

As solutions to the problems of Canada's 
economy, Mr. Armour suggested that Canada 
should take steps to free herself from the 
present enormous dependence on world export 
markets, through encouraging large-scale im- 
migration, and by developing a new range of 
products for export, in place of present raw 
material exports. Finally, he said, government, 
industry and the universities should co-operate 
to a far wider extent than has ever been done 
before in encouraging scientific research for 
Canadian industry and production. 

Recent developments in industrial relations 
policy and methods were discussed by Mr. 
F. C. Mechin, a Director of Imperial Oil, 
Toronto. He stressed the need for decentraliz- 
ing industrial relations' work in order to adapt 
the measures effectively to the needs of each 
branch in a large undertaking, and emphasized 
the importance of establishing pension plans 
to protect the worker against the hazards of 
sickness and old age. 

Dr. A. E. Kerr, President of Dalhousie Uni- 
versity, told the conference that universities 
were giving more and more attention to the 
problems of industrial relations, a field in 
which Dalhousie had been one of the pioneers 
in Canada. Impartiality in outlook and the 
application of scientific methods make the 
university eminently fitted to undertake this 
task, he stated. Equally important are the 
research facilities and trained research s-iatT 
available at universities. Through industrial 
relations' study, Dr. Kerr declared the uni- 
versity takes its rightful place of service to 
the community. 



20 



Decisions of National War Labour Board 



Tl ECENTLY the National War Labour 
-"-^- Board issued decisions in the following 
cases: — 

Western Canada Motor Car Company, 
Limited, Carter Motor Car Company, Limited, 
and International Association of Machinists, 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Midland Railway Company of Manitoba 
and Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Fire and Engine- 
men, Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen and 
Order of Railway Conductors. 

Northern Foundry and Machine Company, 
Limited, and United Steelworkers of America, 
Local 3707, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 

Sudbury Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' 
Union, Local 598, and Falconbridge Nickel 
Mines Limited. 

Cape Breton Bus and Tram Company, 
Limited, and Brotherhood of Railroad Train- 
men, Lodge 684, Cape Breton, N.S. 



Dow Chemical Company of Canada, 
Limited, and United Mine Workers of 
America, District 50, Sarnia, Ont. 

Imperial Oil Limited, Producing Depart- 
ment (Western Operations), Royalite Oil 
Company, Limited, Madison Natural Gas 
Company, Limited, Valley Pipe Line Com- 
pany, Limited. 

Pacific Coyle Navigation Company, Limited, 
Marpole Towing Company, Limited, Van- 
couver Barge Transportation Limited, Victoria 
Tug Company, Limited, M. R. Cliff and B. C. 
Mills Towing Company, Limited, Young and 
Gore Tugboat Company, Limited, and Cana- 
dian Seamen's Union. 

Building Products Limited, and La Federa- 
tion Nationale des Travailleurs de la Pulpe 
et du Papier Inc. (Pont Rouge). 

Charlebois Hat Incorporated and National 
Syndicate of the Hat Industry, Montreal. 

Industrial Union of Veneer Workers, Local 
No. 1, CCL, and Canada Veneers Limited. 



Re: Western Canada Motor Gar Company, Limited, Carter Motor Car 
Company, Limited, and International Association of Machinists, 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Reasons for Decision 

The Association applied to the Regional 
War Labour Board for Manitoba for an 
order directing the Companies to increase wage 
rates of their shop employees. The Company 
opposed the application. 

At the hearing of the cases before the 
Regional Board, Counsel for the Companies 
raised the preliminary objection that the 
Association had not shown that it had 
authority to make the applications on behalf 
of any of the employees of the Companies 
concerned. 

After the hearing, but before the Regional 
Board had rendered its decision, the Union 
filed with that Board, certificates issued under 
Wartime Labour Relations Regulations, P.C. 
1003, by the Regional Labour Relations Board 
for Manitoba, which certificates are dated 
September 13, 1945. The certificates show 
that M. B. Thornton), E. G. Ecton, D. 
Christinson and the Association are the 
properly chosen bargaining representatives for 
the employees of the Companies who are in 
classifications generally described as Auto- 



motive Repair Mechanics. The certificates 
excluded from the bargaining unit those 
employees in the supervisory force, stockroom, 
filling station service and those excluded by 
Section 2 (1) (/) of P.C. 1003. Incidentally, 
each certificate is styled in the name of the 
employer concerned, on the one part, and the 
International Association of Machinists, as 
applicant, on the other part. Moreover, the 
following recital appears in each certificate: 
"And whereas it has been determined to the 
satisfaction of the Manitoba Wartime Labour 
Relations Board, that the majority of the 
employees employed by the above-named 
employer, excepting as herein below men- 
tioned, have authorized the Applicant Union 
to choose bargaining representatives on their 
behalf." 

The Regional Board in its well reasoned 
decision had this to say about the late filing 
of the said certificates: "While the authoriza- 
tions were filed subsequent to the oral argu- 
ment, the Board believes that no useful 
purpose would be served by refusing to 
recognize these authorizations Nunc. Pro Tunc 



21 



22 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



(i.e. the filing serves to correct an irregu- 
larity if, in fact, written authorizations should 
have been filed under Section 32). The Board 
remembers that Counsel for the Companies 
frankly stated that an authorization from one 
employee, or the appearance of one employee, 
would presumably have constituted compli- 
ance with Section 32. The Board adopts the 
late filed authorizations as confirmation of the 
employees' choice of the Association to make 
the application on their behalf." 

The Regional Board found itself forced to 
the following conclusions in respect of the 
preliminary objection, namely: — 

(1) That the employer did, in recent pro- 
ceedings before the Board, recognize the 
representative status of the applicant and has 
not submitted any evidence to contravert or 
displace that status; hence is not in a posi- 
tion at this time to challenge the status of 
the Association; 

(2) That the Association has secured certi- 
fication under P.C. 1003 and no evidence has 
been adduced to show that the certification 
has been or could be vacated or terminated; 

(3) That the late filed authorization should 
be and are given weight as satisfying the 
Board that the application has been made and 
is being presented on behalf of the affected 
employees of both Companies. 

The Regional Board ruled that the Associa- 
tion has the authority to prosecute the 
application. From that decision this appeal 
is taken. 

Section 32 of Wartime Wages Control 
Order, 1943, P.C. 9384, as amended, reads as 
follows: — 

Where it is provided in this Order that any 
direction or order may be given by the 
National Board, an application may be made 
by an employer or by or on behalf of an 
employee for such direction or order. 

Counsel for the Companies argued that 
certification under Wartime Labour Relations 
Regulations, Order in Council P.C. 1003, does 
not constitute sufficient authorization for the 
purposes of said Section 32; that the Union 
was not a properly certified bargaining agent, 
there being no authority in P.C. 1003 for 
certification of a Union per se; if certification 
is acceptable for the purposes of P.C. 9374, 
then the application was not properly made 
by reason of the fact that sufficient authority 
and scope of authority to represent the 
employees was not proven. 

Little, if any, use can now be made of any 
decision touching upon the issues raised in 
this appeal. However, it is incumbent upon 
us to deal with those issues since the merits 



of the Association's applications have still to 
be considered by the Regional Board. 

Counsel for the Companies placed much 
emphasis on his submission that a trade union 
could not be certified under P.C. 1003. Be 
that as it may, that submission has little or 
no application in a case under Wartime Wages 
Control Order, 1943. In our view a trade 
union is not precluded from prosecuting an 
application under the Wages Order on behalf 
of its members, by reason only of the fact 
that it may not be certified under Wartime 
Labour Relations Order. 

It so happens that the Manitoba Regional 
War Labour Board has for its members the 
same individuals as go to make up the 
Manitoba Labour Relations Board. It was 
that Labour Relations Board which certified 
the bargaining representatives above named. 
When considering the labour relations case 
those members obtained evidence showing that 
the majority of the employees affected were 
members of one trade union, the Association 
concerned in this case. It is only natural to 
find that the members of the Regional War 
Labour Board took cognizance of the infor- 
mation they had acquired in the case before 
the Labour Relations Board, and in the 
circumstances we think the Regional Board 
was right in so doing. 

While under the prevailing policy our 
legislation gives to labour organizations a 
large measure of protection,, they have no 
legal existence; they are not endowed with 
any distinct personality; they have no 
corporate entity; they constitute merely 
collectivities of persons. In the circum- 
stances the relationship of principal and agent 
could not exist between the members of the 
Union and the Union itself. The acts of such 
an organization are only the acts of its 
members. Accordingly we find it difficult to 
follow Counsel's argument to the effect that 
the Union stood before the Board as an agent 
for the employees and that it should prove its 
authority to act as such agent. 

We confirm the Regional Board's decision 
in this case. 

It may well be that Counsel's representa- 
tions concerning certain provisions of P.C. 
1003, will be helpful to the officers of the 
Crown responsible for the administration of 
that Order in Council or of any replacing 
law or regulation. We shall cause those rep- 
resentations to be transmitted to the proper 
authorities. 

December 11, 1946. 



1947] 



NATIONAL WAR LABOUR BOARD 



23 



Re: Midland Railway Company of Manitoba and Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive Fire and Enginemen, Brother- 
hood of Railroad Trainmen and Order of Railway Conductors. 



Reasons for Decision 

The above-named Unions applied to the 
Board for an order directing the Company to 
increase wage rates for occupational classifi- 
cations of employees covered by collective 
agreements made between the Company and 
the Unions. The increases requested are those 
mentioned in certain agreements made this 
year between Carriers Conference Committees 
representing railroad companies in the United 
States and the above-named Unions and 
others. The Midland Railway Company of 
Manitoba was not mentioned in the U.S. 
agreements. 

The U.S. railroads have implemented the 
terms of the agreements made on their behalf 
by the Carriers Conference Committees. This 
implementation was not only made in the 
United States, but also in respect of employees 
in Canada engaged in International Railway 
Services. Incidentally, the National War 
Labour Board approved applications made by 
the U.S. railroads affecting their employees in 
Canada. The approvals were made under and 
by virtue of Section 22 of Wartime Wages 
Control Order, 1943. Sub-section 1 of that 
Section reads as follows: 

If the National Board finds that the rate 
or range of rates payable by an employer for 
an occupational classification of his employees 
engaged in international railway service was, 
at November 15, 1941, pursuant to a collective 
agreement or to a recognized practice of long 
etanding, based upon a rate or range of rates 
payable to similar employees of that employer 
outside of Canada, and if the National Board 
also finds that the rate or range of rates out- 
side of Canada upon which the said rate or 
range of rates was based has been changed by 
a collective agreement, established practice 
or competent authority, the National Board 
may in its sole discretion authorize or direct 
the payment of a new rate or range of rates 
for that occupational classification in respect 
of employees engaged in international railway 
service based in a corresponding manner upon 
the corresponding new rate or range of rates 
payable outside of Canada. 

To succeed the Unions must bring their 
case within Section 22. They must show that 
the Midland Company is an employer referred 
to in that Section. 

The Midland Company was incorporated by 
an Act of the Legislature of Manitoba. Sub- 
sequently and by an Act of the Parliament of 
Canada, the railway was declared to be a work 



for the general advantage of Canada and in 
consequence came within the legislative ambit 
of Parliament and under the jurisdiction of the 
Board of Transport Commissioners for Canada. 

It was brought to our attention that the 
capital stock of Midland is held by two rail- 
road companies in the United States. This 
fact has no bearing on the issues involved in 
the case. 

The Company operates a line of railway 
between the city of Winnipeg and the Inter- 
national Boundary line, a distance of 65 miles. 
Its train crews are made up of personnel bor- 
rowed from the Canadian National Railways. 
It does not have any employees outside of 
Canada, at least in the occupational classifica- 
tions in which the employees concerned in this 
case are employed. In view of the foregoing 
we are obliged to find that the jurisdiction 
conferred by Section 22 does not extend to the 
point where wage problems involving Midland 
Railway Company of Manitoba could be dealt 
with in the manner proposed by the Union. 

Representatives of the Unions say that 
approval of this application would establish 
wage rates for the employees equal to those 
paid to employees in the same occupational 
classifications on the railways in the U.S.; that 
the Company had, on all previous occasions, 
recognized the U.S. rates, conditions of employ- 
ment and pension schemes as being applicable 
to their employees; that the Company and 
the Union, on previous occasions, joined in 
asking the National War Labour Board to 
grant the Company permission to pay the same 
rates as those in effect in the U.S.; and that 
the National Board granted such permission. 

The National Board, as presently consti- 
tuted, is not aware of the factors which 
influenced the Board when it granted per- 
mission as aforementioned. No doubt there 
were good and sufficient reasons to support 
the Board's action at that time. At this time, 
however, we are unable to find any reason 
which would justify our approving the present 
application. Counsel for the Company has 
satisfied us that the Company is not one to 
which Section 22 is intended to apply. Since 
the Union's case stands or falls accordingly as 
this point is determined, it follows that the 
application must be dismissed. 

December 16, 1946. 



24 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



Re: Northern Foundry and Machine Company, Limited, and United Steel 
workers of America, Local 3707, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 



Reasons for Decision 

This is an appeal by the Company from 
a decision of the Regional War Labour Board 
for Ontario, dated September 19, 1946. In 
that decision the Regional Board directed the 
Company to increase wage rates for its hourly 
paid employees. 

The grounds of appeal are: — 

(1) That the directed wage rates are higher 
than those in effect in the plants of their 
competitors and in consequence, cannot 
be justified. 

(2) In the .alternative and provided the 
National Board confirms the rates, the 
retroactive effect of the Regional Board's 
decision should be cancelled. 

The increases directed are from 2 cents to 
8 cents an hour above the previous rates, 
except in the case of the Foundry Furnace 
(Cupola) Men, where the increase amounted 
to 14J cents an hour. We have studied the 
rates set by the Regional Board and have 
come to the conclusion that all, excepting 
that for the Foundry Furnace Men, are 
reasonable. 

The Union sought to justify the rates fixed 
for the Foundry Furnace Men by producing 
evidence showing the rates paid by Algoma 
Steel Corporation at Sault Ste. Marie, to its 
Foundry Furnace Men. A comparison of the 
job description duties and responsibilities of 
the occupational classification in the Com- 
pany's plant with that of the same styled 
occupational classification in Algoma does not 
support the Union's claim. From the infor- 
mation we have on hand and in view of the 
adjustments made in the rates for other 
classifications, we are of the opinion that the 
increase for Foundry Furnace Men should be 
limited to 8 cents an hour. 

We confirm the Regional Board's decision 
on rates for all occupational classifications 
except Foundry Furnace Men for which the 
rate of 75 cents an hour is fixed. 

There was considerable delay on the Com- 
pany's part in filing its reply to the Union's 



application to the Regional Board with the 
result that almost eight months elapsed 
between the filing of the application and the 
date of the Regional Board's decision. We 
were told by the Company's representatives 
that they had explained reasons for the delay 
to the officers of the Local Union, and that 
the local officers seemed to be satisfied with 
the explanation. The Union's representative 
appearing before us had no knowledge of the 
conferences which took place between the 
management and the local and was unable 
to assist us on this point. We accept the 
Company's explanation for the delay. 

The Company manufactures centrifugal 
pumps and rotary vacuum filters, castings, 
plate work and other miscellaneous products 
for use in the pulp and paper and mining 
industries. Practically all of the Company's 
products are manufactured to special orders 
and according to specifications appropriate to 
the particular needs. The price of an article 
produced on one order is not necessarily, and 
indeed seldom is, the same as the price of a 
substantially similar article produced on 
another order. Moreover, this particular 
branch of the steel industry is highly com- 
petitive which fact causes the manufacturers 
to operate on narrow margins of profit on 
each contract. We understand that a firm 
price is established for an article before that 
article is produced. In view of the foregoing 
it would not be fair to require the Company 
to absorb the added wage costs for the retro- 
active period stipulated by the Regional 
Board, particularly is this so since the Com- 
pany's overall profit position is not good. 

In this Board's Finding and Direction the 
Regional Board's decision will be varied 
firstly in respect of the rate for Foundry 
Furnace Men, and secondly as to its effective 
date. The effective date shall be September 25, 
1946, the date of the Regional Board's 
decision. 

December 16, 1946. 



Re: Sudbury Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local 598, and 
Falconbridge Nickel Mines Limited. 



Reasons for Decision 

This is an application by the Union for an 
order directing the Company, with effect from 
August 10, 1946, to increase by fifteen (15) 
cents per hour wage rates for all occupa- 
tional classifications covered by collective 
agreement. Six hundred and fifty (650) 



employees, approximately, are involved in this 
application. 

The Union bases its case largely upon 
comparisons with wage rates as paid to 
employees having the same job titles in the 
service of the International Nickel Company 
Limited im the same locality. 



1947] 



NATIONAL WAR LABOUR BOARD 



25 



Employees of International Nickel Com- 
pany Limited represented by the same Union 
recently received a wage increase of ten (10) 
cents per hour and are paid off-shift differ- 
entials. The Union argued that an increase 
of fifteen (15) cents an hour would be 
warranted in this case because of the changes 
which have taken place in wage rates at 
International Nickel, and because of the fact 
that off-shift differentials are not paid at 
Falconbridge. 

In support of their application the Union 
submitted lists of the occupational classifica- 
tions of the two companies with wage rates 
paid by each. 

The Company on its part contended that 
its operations could not be compared with the 
much larger and more specialized operations 
of International Nickel and that if any com- 
parison were pertinent it should be with the 
gold mining industry; also that the job con- 
tent of many of the occupational classifica- 
tions at Falconbridge, though going under the 
same name as classifications at International 
Nickel, would not in fact be equivalent, as the 
work done and equipment handled in the two 
operations are not necessarily the same. 

The Company also, while not pleading 
inability to pay, submitted that they had 
suffered certain disadvantages with which no 
other nickel producer had been faced. This 
because their refinery was situated in Norway 
and so was in enemy hands throughout the 
war. This created unique post-war rehabilita- 
tion and marketing problems. The Union in 
rebuttal, while not denying the unfortunate 
experience, claimed that the Company had 
emerged in relatively good position, and that 
in any case no plea of inability to pay was 
before the Board. The Company did not 
offer any evidence which might assist us in 
determining whether enemy occupation of its 
refinery in Norway had any adverse effect 
on its operations in Canada. 

At the hearing it was stated that beyond 
the incorporation of cost of living bonus into 
wage rates, employees of Falconbridge Nickel 
Mines Limited had received no general in- 
crease since the outbreak of hostilities in 1939. 
It was shown, however, that in 1943, as a 
result of reclassification duly approved by 
Finding and Direction of the National War 



Labour Board, some one hundred and sixty- 
eight (168) jobs were reclassified affecting two 
hundred and eighty-two (282) employees out 
of a total working force at that time of 
approximately eleven hundred (1,100). So far 
as we are aware this adjustment brought the 
Falconbridge wage schedule into proper rela- 
tionship with the then existing schedule at 
International Nickel. 

We have come to the conclusion that it 
would be improper for us to regard the non- 
existence of an off-shift differential at Falcon- 
bridge as a factor when considering the actual 
hourly rates for the performance of specific 
work. 

Having regard to all the circumstances 
pertinent to this case, we have reached the 
conclusion that we should order a wage 
increase of ten (10) cents per hour for 
employees covered by the application. 

It appears that by collective agreement 
between the parties dated September 12, 1946, 
authority is also needed to permit the Com- 
pany to implement that term of the agree- 
ment which provides that employees on hourly 
wage rates are to be paid at rate of time and 
one-half for work performed on two addi- 
tional statutory holidays per year, this 
provision will be approved. 

There remains the question of the effective 
date. The former agreement expired on 
August 10, 1946. Although the parties were 
in negotiation prior to and after that date, 
an agreement was not reached until Sep- 
tember 12, 1946, the date of the new contract 
which is for a term of twelve months. Article 
11 of that agreement reads as follows: — 

The existing hourly wage rates and classifi- 
cations shall remain in effect unless altered 
by the National War Labour Board, its 
successor, or in the absence of such govern- 
mental agency, by negotiation between the 
Company and the Union. 

The Union made application on Septem- 
ber 25, 1946. All other matters covered by 
the agreement being effective from its date 
and the Article quoted being an integral part 
of the agreement, we consider that the new 
wage scale should also have effect as of the 
date mentioned, namely, September 12, 1946. 

Finding and Direction accordingly. 

December 16, 1946. 



Re: Cape Breton Bus and Tram Company, Limited, and Brotherhood of 
Railroad Trainmen, Lodge 684, Gape Breton, N.S. 
Reasons for Decision 

This is an appeal from a decision of the 
Regional War Labour Board for Nova Scotia, 
dated August 7, 1946. In and by that decision 
the Regional Board, upon the application of 
the Union, directed the Company to increase 



wage rates for its hourly rated employees 
including bus and tram operators, shop men 
and line men. 

The Regional Board's Finding and Direction 
set forth single rates and ranges of rates, as 
the case may be, for seventeen occupational 



26 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



classifications. We are told that the Regional 
Board intended to direct the Company to 
increase wage rates for all employees by 10 
cents an hour. Such intention is not clearly 
indicated in the Finding and Direction in 
respect of the nine classifications for which 
ranges of rates are provided. For the purposes 
of this decision, however, we recognize the 
Regional Board's intention to direct a general 
increase of 10 cents an hour. 

As its name would imply, the Company is 
engaged in the transportation business. Thirty- 
three of its ninety employees are bus and tram 
operators. The operators form, by far, the 
largest occupational group in the Company's 
employ. In these circumstances it is appro- 
priate that we consider first that part of the 
Regional Board's decision which concerns the 
operators. 

During the period of Wage Control, the 
National Board has been called upon to con- 
sider the wage rate problems of most of the 
transportation companies in Canada. Accord- 
ingly, the Board has knowledge of the wage 
schedules in effect in the industry generally, 
and, further is in position to classify the wage 
schedules in relation to the size of operations 
and the localities in which the operations are 
conducted. 

The Company maintains and operates an 
inter-urban transportation system. It serves 
Sydney, Glace Bay and other points in the 
north part of Cape Breton. Its financial state- 
ment furnishes us with sufficient information 
to give us a fair idea of the volume of its 
operations. 

After ascertaining the nature and extent of 
the Company's operations, we compared the 



wage rates directed by the Regional Board 
with the wage rates paid by employers which, 
in our opinion, are most nearly comparable. 
Our analysis reveals that the directed rates 
for the operators cannot be justified. We have, 
however, decided that the existing rates for 
the operators should be increased by 3 cents 
an hour. 

A study of the rates now in effect for the 
other occupational classifications involved in 
this case suggests the possible lack of proper 
differentials between some of the classifications. 
There may, however, be good and sufficient 
reasons for the existing differentials. We 
would not disturb those differentials except 
in pursuance of a report founded upon the 
results of a job evaluation conducted on the 
property and which would recommend varia- 
tion in differentials. There is no such report 
in this case, hence other tests must be applied 
to the Regional Board's decision affecting the 
employees other than operators. The test 
which seems most appropriate here is one 
which takes into account the weighted average 
of the rates now paid to the employers con- 
cerned, and, having established that average, 
to compare it with the results of similar 
calculations made on rates paid in comparable 
establishments. Such test, when applied to 
this case, does not indicate that a ten cents 
an hour increase is justified. The best infor- 
mation available to us leads us to the conclu- 
sion that an increase of 5 cents an hour is 
justified. 

The appeal is allowed to the extent above 
indicated. 

Finding and Direction accordingly. 

December 19, 1946. 



Re: Dow Chemical Company of Canada, Limited, and United Mine Workers 
of America, District 50, Sarnia, Ont. 

Reasons for Decision 



The Company applied to the Regional War 
Labour Board for Ontario for permission to 
increase wage rates for its hourly-rated em- 
ployees by 9-09 per cent. The Company 
stated in its application that the increase, if 
approved, would go into effect coincident with 
the reduction of 4 hours in the Company's 
normal work week. By way of a counter- 
submission to the Company's application, the 
Union asked the Regional Board to direct the 
Company to increase wage rates by 12 cents 
an hour. 

The Regional Board authorized the Com- 
pany to increase wages by 10 per cent. There 
was no reference in the Regional Board's Find- 
ing and Direction to the reduced work week. 

The Union declined to agree to the Com- 
pany's proposal to reduce the number of hours 



in the work week because of the provision in 
the current collective agreement which stipu- 
lates that the normal work week shall be one 
of 48 hours. The Union takes the position 
that that condition of employment should 
not be altered until at least the collective 
agreement expires on January 31, 1947. 

When the Company learned that the Union 
would not agree to the reduced work week, an 
appeal from the Regional Board's decision was 
instituted. In the brief on appeal the Com- 
pany asks us to direct it to reduce its normal 
work week to 44 hours and to increase wage 
rates to the extent necessary to maintain the 
weekly earnings of its employees. 

The Union cross appeals and asks us to 
direct the Company to increase wage rates by 
12 cents an hour. 

The Company is engaged in the manufacture 
of styrene. The plant used by it is located 



1947] 



NATIONAL WAR LABOUR BOARD 



27 



within an enclosure which also contains the 
Butadiene Plant of Polymer Corporation, and 
Canadian Synthetic Rubber's Plant which 
combines the styrene and butadiene to make 
rubber. The Company's hourly rated 
employees number approximately 50, Poly- 
mer's employees total 950, and Canadian 
Synthetic has 125 hourly rated employees. 

The wage schedules established in all three 
plants at the commencement of operations 
were founded on a common base. Wage rates 
for the same or comparable occupational 
classifications were the same in the three 
establishments. 

In July 1946, Polymer, Dow and Canadian 
Synthetic agreed to reduce their work week 
from 48 to 44 hours and to seek permission 
to increase wages "to* maintain take-home 
pay". The 950 Polymer employees and the 
125 Canadian Synthetic Rubber Company 
employees agreed to the proposal and the 
necessary approvals were obtained. The 
United Mine Workers representing the 50 
Dow employees did not accept the proposal 
and, as above indicated, asked for a rate 
increase without reduction of hours. 



As matters now stand an operator, for 
example, employed by Dow, who works 48 
hours, receives the same amount of money as 
his equal at Polymer receives for working 44 
hours. The Dow Company is, however, wil- 
ling to place its employees under the same 
conditions of employment as those enjoyed 
by the employees of the other two companies. 

This Board has never directed any employer 
to reduce or increase the number of hours 
making up his normal work week. On 
occasion the Board has authorized wage in- 
creases which were predicated upon a shorter 
work week, but the operative part of such 
authorization concerned wages onry. In keep- 
ing with our practice we must refuse the Com- 
pany's request and dismiss its appeal. 

Allowance of the Union's request would have 
the effect of disturbing the standards set in 
the plants of the three above-named com- 
panies. It would not be in accordance with 
the purposes or provision of Wartime Wages 
Control Order, 1943, to do so. In the circum- 
stances we dismiss the Union's cross appeal. 

Finding and Direction accordingly. 

December 20, 1946. 



Re: Imperial Oil Limited, Producing Department (Western Operations), 
Royalite Oil Company, Limited, Madison Natural Gas Company, 
Limited, Valley Pipe Line Company, Limited. 

Reasons for Decision 

This is an appeal by and on behalf of 
Imperial Oil Limited, Producing Department 
(Western Operations), and certain subsidiary 
companies, all operating in the Province of 
Alberta, from a decision of the Regional War 
Labour Board for Alberta, dated Septem- 
ber 6, 1946, wherein that Board reaffirmed its 
decision of July 10, 1946, and refused permis- 
sion to pay regular hourly rates for wage 
earner personnel for hours not worked on 
statutory or Company recognized holidays. 
Leave to appeal was granted by the Regional 
Board. 



The issues involved in this case are identical 
with those in the case of Imperial Oil Limited, 
Calgary Refinery. Our decision in that case 
was issued on December 9, 1946. We allow 
the appeal for the same reasons as stated 
by us in our decision in the Calgary case. 
The Board's approval will be confined to the 
six statutory holidays regularly recognized, 
namely, New Year's Day, Good Friday, 
Dominion Day, Labour Day, Thanksgiving 
Day, Christmas Day. 

Finding and Direction will be issued 
accordingly. 

December 21, 1946. 



Re: Pacific Coyle Navigation Company, Limited, Marpole Towing Company, 
Limited, Vancouver Barge Transportation Limited; Victoria Tug 
Company, Limited; M. R. Cliff and B.C. Mills Towing Company, 
Limited; Young and Gore Tugboat Company, Limited; and Canadian 
Seamen's Union. 



Supplementary Reasons for Decision 

In our Reasons for Decision of Septem- 
ber 16, 1946 (L.G., Oct., 1946, p. 1413), issued 
in this case we disposed of matters set out 
in Paragraphs (a) and (b) therein. As regards 
the demands outlined in Paragraphs (c) and 
(d) we said: — 

While expressing its agreement with the 
general principle of an 8-hour day where that 
term of employment is practicable, the 



National Board considers that in the present 
case the exigencies of service inherent in the 
towboat industry on the British Columbia 
Coast are so unusual, but so well known to 
all who accept employment in that industry, 
that the question of what shall constitute a 
working day or month -as the case may be, can 
best be left to the good sense of the parties 
immediately concerned. 

Therefore, the Board refers that phase of 
the application back to Canadian Seamen's 
Union and the employing Companies with the 



28 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



recommendation that they enter into negotia- 
tions. The Board hopes that mutual agree- 
ment may result on such basis that upon joint 
application approval can be given to the 
settlement consistently with the provisions 
and purposes of the Wage Control Order. 

As the question of overtime conditions is 
bound up with agreement as to working hours, 
decision on that point also is deferred pend- 
ing result of the negotiations. 

The parties did go into negotiation and 
representatives of the Companies inform us 
that leave with pay for unlicensed classifica- 
tions has been increased by three (3) days 
time off with pay per month, bringing the 
total of such time off with pay to seven (7) 
days per month or eighty-four (84) days per 
year. We find this arrangement to be reason- 
able in the circumstances of service and we 
therefore approve it. 

As to overtime conditions, no agreement 
has been reached, and the matter is therefore 
still before us. The Union ask for an order 
directing the Companies to establish an over- 
time condition calling for the payment to 
unlicensed personnel at the rate of seventy- 
five (75) cents per hour for all hours worked 
daily in excess of twelve (12) hours. 

Representatives of the Companies contend 
that while punitive overtime conditions may 
be usual in industries whose employees are 
hourly-rated, in their particular industry 
employees are paid on a monthly basis and 
in the circumstances of their service may be 
required to perform actual work for a varying 
number of hours per day. 

Notwithstanding this condition we are 
aware that payment of overtime after a 
specified number of hours per day or per 
month is not an unusual condition for 
unlicensed personnel aboard ship who are 
paid on a monthly basis. This is true not 



only on Canadian inland, coastwise and deep- 
sea vessels where agreements frequently provide 
for an overtime condition for unlicensed 
personnel, but the same type of condition is 
not uncommon in agreements in certain other 
industries where employees work for '"broken" 
time periods but are paid on a monthly basis, 
it being usual in such- cases to pay overtime 
after a specified number of hours have been 
worked in any one month. 

Supervisory personnel are, however, not 
usually paid overtime in the shipping or other 
industry. 

We must agree, therefore, with the conten- 
tion of the Union in this case and accordingly 
will direct the Companies covered by the 
application to establish for their unlicensed 
personnel an overtime condition as follows: — 

An employee who continues on duty for the 
full period of his monthly assignment shall 
be entiled to receive overtime at the rate of 
seventy-five (75) cents an hour for each 
hour he continues on duty in excess of twelve 
(12) hours in any twenty-four (24) hour 
period during that month. 

As to the effective date of this condition, 
the National Board has always considered 
that little, if any, retroactive effect should 
be given in respect of overtime rates because 
of bookkeeping difficulties involved and 
because an employer presumably has not had 
opportunity to so arrange the work of his 
employees that as much overtime as possiole 
may be avoided. We, therefore, consider 
that the overtime condition in this case 
should have effect only from December 1, 
1946. 

Supplementary Finding and Direction will 
issue accordingly. 

December 21, 1946. 



Re: Building Products Limited and La Federation Nationale des Travailleurs 
de la Pulpe et du Papier Inc. (Pont Rouge) 



Reasons for Decision 

This is an appeal by the Company from a 
decision of the Regional War Labour Board 
for Quebec. In and by that decision the 
Regional Board directed the Company to 
increase wages 7i cents an hour for all hourly 
rated employees engaged at its Pont Rouge, 
Quebec, plant. 

The decision under appeal is the second in 
1946 wherein the Company was directed to 
increase wages. The first decision directed 
increases ranging from 5 cents to 114 cents 
an hour with effect from January 1, 1946. The 
7£ cents increase in question in this' appeal, 
if allowed, would establish rates 12V cents to 
19 cents an hour higher than those which 
were in effect on December 31, 1945. 



The Company maintains that the Regional 
Board erred in that it failed, when considering 
the case, to take into account and be guided 
by the wage rates generally prevailing in the 
establishments of the Company's Competitors. 
The Company alleges that the Regional 
Board's Decision was based on the Federation's 
submissions that the operations of the Com- 
pany were comparable to those of Canadian 
International Paper Company and Donnacona 
Paper Company, where higher wages arc paid. 
It is not necessary to ascertain the basis of the 
Regional Board's decision because the Federa- 
tion sought to support the Regional Board's 
decision by introducing evidence before us to 
show that the increases directed can be justi- 



1947] 



NATIONAL WAR LABOUR BOARD 



29 



fied when rates in effect at the other two 
named companies are taken into account. 

The Company manufactures asphalt shingles, 
siding, roofing and flooring. Canadian Inter- 
national Paper and Donnacona are engaged 
chiefly in the manufacture of newsprint, 
sulphite fibre and groundwood. A small part 
(7 per cent) of Donnacona's operations is 
devoted to the manufacture of insulating 
board, which is in direct competition with a 
similar product manufactured by the Company. 

We were supplied with names of the man- 
facturers regarded by Building Products as its 
competitors. The wage rates in effect in the 
competitors' plants were also reported to us. 

An examination of the records showing the 
wage rates in effect in August 1939, as well 
as the increases from time to time made in 
the Company's plant and in those of the 
employers referred to by the appellant as 
competitors, indicates that a substantial 
measure of uniformity in wage schedules in 
the several plants was maintained throughout 
the period. In August 1939 the wage rates in 
the pulp and paper industry of which Cana- 
dian International Paper and Donnacona are 
members were higher than those in the build- 
ing products plants and they have continued 
to remain at higher levels. 

The evidence does not support the conten- 
tion that Building Products Limited should be 



regarded as being part of the pulp and paper 
industry. The Company's products are sold 
in a highly competitive domestic market, and 
as indicated above, they are not of the same 
classes of products as those sold by manu- 
facturers in the pulp and paper industry. 

In view of the foregoing, we are obliged to 
conclude that an increase in the wage rates of 
the employees concerned in this appeal can be 
justified only if and to the extent that the 
increased rates are just and reasonable within 
the meaning of the Wartime Wages Control 
Order, 1943, P.C. 9384, as amended, having 
due regard to the progressions of the wage 
rates in this firm since 1939 and the general 
level of wage rates in the building products 
industry generally. 

The base rates in the plant of the Company 
are 52^ cents an hour. According to our 
information it would be just and reasonable 
to fix the base rate at 55 cents an hour. In 
order that the differential heretofore prevail- 
ing in the wage rates of the employees in the 
several occupational classifications concerned, 
may be maintained, we also find it reasonable 
to direct increases at 2\ cents an hour in the 
wage rates for those classifications receiving 
more than the base rate. 

The appeal is allowed to the extent indicated 
above. Finding and Direction accordingly. 
December 28, 1946. 



Re: Gharlebois Hat Incorporated and National Syndicate of the Hat Industry, 
Montreal 



Reasons for Decision 

This is an application for leave to appeal 
and an appeal by the Company from a Finding 
and Direction of the Regional War Labour 
Board for Quebec, dated September 7, 1946. 
By that Finding and Direction the Regional 
Board directed the Company to grant its 
employees one week's vacation with pay. 

On or about December 20, 1945, the Com- 
pany and the Union entered into a collective 
agreement. The agreement provides that it 
shall continue in force for one year certain and 
(thereafter from year to year unless terminated 
by notice given by one of the parties to the 
other within a period prescribed. 

The agreement as originally drafted by the 
Union, contained a section which read as 
follows: — 

26 — Vacations: If the Regional War 

Board or any other Order in Council 

decrees. 

The officers of the Company refused to sign 
an agreement which contained such a section. 
Accordingly the section was marked "can- 
celled" and the note of cancellation was 
initialled. 



In August 1946, the Union applied to the 
Regional Board for an order directing the 
Company to grant its employees one week's 
vacation with pay. It was stated on behalf 
of the Company that the Regional Board 
issued its direction without first giving notice 
to the Company that the application in 
question had been filed. There is nothing in 
the Regional Board's record to cause us to 
question the Company's statement. 

We believe that if the Regional Board had 
had all the facts of the case before it, the 
application would have been dismissed. At 
dJiy rate, after hearing both parties we are 
satisfied that the application should have been 
dismissed. The Union endeavoured to sup- 
port its application and the Regional Board's 
Finding and Direction with the argument that 
there was no particular significance in the 
cancellation or deletion of Section 26. The 
Company says that Section 26 was deleted 
because it was understood and agreed that the 
issue concerning vacations would not be raised 
during the occurrency of the agreement. We 
accept the Company's explanation as being 
the logical one. We are satisfied that the 



30 



THE LABOUK GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



Company's officers relied upon the agreement 
as signed as being something which would 
settle all their labour problems until at least 
December 20, 1946. 



We grant the application for leave to appeal 
and allow the appeal. 
Finding and Direction accordingly. 

January 10, 1947. 



Re: Industrial Union of Veneer Workers, Local No. 1, CCL, and Canada 
Veneers Limited. 



Reasons for Decision 

The Union applies for leave to appeal and 
appeals from a Finding and Direction of the 
Regional War Labour Board for New Bruns- 
wick, dated September 10, 1946, whereby the 
Regional Board authorized the Compan}*- to 
implement a general wage increase of 6 cents 
per hour. 

The Union contends that the Regional 
Board should have directed the Company to 
increase its wage rates by 10 cents per hour. 
With much respect to the Regional Board, 
we are constrained to agree with the Union's 
argument. In doing so we cannot be 
unmindful of the fact that the general level 
of wage rates being paid in this plant are 
relatively low; that no general wage increase 
has been granted to the Company's employees 



since 1943. We have information concerning 
the wage rates being paid in industrial 
employment in Saint John, New Brunswick, 
and we are of the opinion that if we award 
a general increase of 10 cents per hour it 
would be consistent with wage rates paid in 
the Saint John area. 

For the reasons stated above the applica- 
tion for leave to appeal and appeal are 
allowed. The Regional Board's Finding and 
Direction will be varied so that the Company 
will be directed, rather than authorized, to 
increase its wage rates by 6 cents per hour 
and the Company will also be directed to 
increase its wage rates by an additional 4 cents 
per hour effective as from November 13, 1946. 

Finding and Direction will be issued 
accordingly. 

January 9, 1947. 



Industrial Disputes and Conciliation 



Introduction 



THE Industrial Disputes and Conciliation 
section contains monthly articles dealing 
with proceedings under the National Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations and with pro- 
ceedings under the Conciliation and Labour 
Act and other legislation. 

Under the Wartime Labour Relations Regu- 
lations, P.C. 1003, the Government has ex- 
tended its jurisdiction over employer-employee 
relations which are normally exclusively within 
the provincial field to the extent considered 
necessary to cover adequately employers and 
employees in industries "essential to the 
efficient prosecution of the war", but without 
attempting to include other industry which has 
not a direct bearing on war production. In 
so far as these latter industries are concerned, 
each province can make its own decisions as 
to whether or not they shall be brought under 
the Regulations. 

Agreements have been made under the 
Regulations between the Dominion and every 



province except Alberta and Prince Edward 
Island providing for the setting up of pro- 
vincial agencies for the administration of the 
Regulations. 

The Work of the Wartime Labour Relations 
Board (National) is here described in two 
separate articles. The first deals with applica- 
tions made by unions for certification and 
their disposition by the Board; the second 
describes conciliation proceedings under the 
Regulations and includes the reports of Boards 
of Conciliation. 

Conciliation proceedings are also carried on 
by the Industrial Relations Branch of the 
Department of Labour under the provisions 
of the Conciliation and Labour Act which 
empowers the Minister to inquire into the 
causes and circumstances of a dispute, to take 
such steps as seen expedient for the purpose 
of bringing the parties together, and to appoint 
a conciliator or an arbitrator when requested 
by the parties concerned; and under P.C. 4020. 



Applications for Certification Under the Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations 



r T s HE Wartime Labour Relations Board 
•*- (National) met for three days during the 
month of December. During the month the 
Board received four applications, held five 
hearings, issued twelve certificates designating 
bargaining representatives, rejected one appli- 
cation, ordered one representation vote, allowed 
the withdrawal of one application and rendered 
decisions in seven appeal cases. 

Certificates Issued 

Twelve applications for certification of bar- 
gaining representatives were approved by the 
Board and certificates issued as below: 

1. Messrs. Charles Eugene Saint-Laurent, 
Jean Charles deChamplain, Elias Bernier, 
Paul Emile Caron and Paul Emile Marquette 
and the Canadian Association of Maritime 
Transport Workers, Local No. 1, Inc., for em- 
ployees of the Lower St. Lawrence Transport 
Company Limited on board the SS "Rimouski", 
SS "Jean Brillant" and SS "Metane". The 
captains, first mates, second mates, third mates, 



chief engineers, second engineers, third engi- 
neers and chief stewards were excluded from 
the bargaining unit. 

2. Messrs. J. L. Pateman and A. Mose and 
the Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship 
Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Station 
Employees for the employees in the super- 
intendent's office of the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way Company, Nelson, B.C., classified as 
stenographer, clerk, and maintenance-of-way 
clerk. The chief clerk, the assistant chief 
clerk, the superintendent's secretary and the 
port steward were excluded from the bargaining 
unit. 

3. Messrs. Arthur Lyman Fleming and John 
Edgar O'Brien and the Canadian National 
Telegraph Unit No. 1, Federation of Employee- 
Professional Engineers and Assistants' for the 
professional engineers and their technical 
assistants and draftsmen employed in the 
Engineering Department, Canadian National 
Telegraphs, Toronto, Ontario, classified as act- 
ing assistant equipment engineer, acting 



31 



79014—3 



32 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



electrical engineer, assistant engineers, engineer- 
ing assistants, draftsmen and junior draftsmen. 
The chief engineer, transmission engineer, out- 
side plant engineer, acting equipment engineer, 
chief clerks, shop foreman and clerical em- 
ployees were excluded from the bargaining 
unit. 

4. Messrs. J. L. Pateman, E. F. Downard 
and A. Mose and the Brotherhood oj Railway 
and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, 
Express and Station Employees for employees 
in the superintendent's office of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company, Medicine Hat, Al- 
berta, classified as maintenance clerk, staff 
records clerk, stenographers, and junior clerk. 
Excluded from the bargaining unit were the 
chief clerk, the assistant chief clerk and the 
superintendent's secretary. 

5. Messrs. H. McKenna, P. Carty, W. James 
and J. Lidgett and Western Canada Firebosses' 
Association, Sub-District No. 2 for firebosses in 
the employ of the McLeod River Hard Coal 
Company (194V Limited, Mercoal, Alberta. 

6. Messrs. H. McKenna, P. Carty, J. E. 
Mitchell and D. F. R. Tompkins and Western 
Canada Firebosses' Association, Sub-district 
No. 2, for firebosses in the employ of the 
Foothills Collieries Limited, Foothills, Alberta. 

7. Messrs. A. R. Mosher, J. E. McGuire, 
W. J. Smith, J. A. Querido, A. Trainer, J. H. 
Mclnnis, A. B. Connolly, J. Hook and Mmes. 
V. M. Ferguson and H. N. Martin and the 
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway Employees 
and Other Transport Workers, Division 297, 
for employees of the Charlottetown Hotel 
(Canadian National Railways), Charlottetown, 
P.E.I. The manager, the manager's secretary, 
accountant, clerk-stenographer in the account- 
ant's office, steward, chef, 'head waitress, house- 
keeper, head bellman and porter, night watch- 
man, chief engineer and laundry supervisor 
were excluded from the bargaining unit. 

8. Messrs. J. Fadling, K. Larsen, H. Pritchett, 
H. Bergeron, M. Mosher, M. Fulton, A. Dunn 
and G. Argatoff and International Wood- 
workers oj America, Local 1-425 for employees 
of the William Waldie and Sons, Limited, 
Castlegar, B.C., on board the tug boat "Eleco 
The Second". The captain and engineer were 
excluded from the bargaining unit. 

9. Messrs. Michael J. Thomas, Henry A. 
Lowndes, Lou C. Walsh and Misses Edna 
Hislop, Inez Moore and Margaret A. Evoy 
and the Commercial Employees Organization 
for employees in the Commercial Department 
of the Bell Telephone Company of Canada 
(Eastern and Western Areas), Montreal, P.Q., 
in the following occupational classifications, 
viz., advance account clerk, advertising com- 
mission clerk, advertising contract clerk, bal- 



ance clerk, budget clerk, business office repre- 
sentative, chief teller, claims file clerk, clerk- 
P.BJC. attendant, clerk representative, coin 
box clerk, coin box collector, coin box routing 
clerk, connecting company clerk, correspon- 
dence filing clerk, cutover assistant, directory 
advertising salesman, directory advertising 
saleswoman, field surveyman, held order clerk, 
layout artist, local representative, mail clerk, 
mail porter, matron, map records clerk, office 
junior, order typist, outside representative, 
outside representative and clerk, posting clerk, 
public telephone attendant, record clerk, re- 
sults clerks, salesman — small business, sales- 
man — rural, salesman — public telephone, sales- 
man — telephone sales, salesman — medium 
business, salesman — toll, salesman — multi-pub- 
lic telephone, salesman — special services, 
salesman — large PJBJK., sales consultant, sales 
records clerk, sales results clerk, senior file 
clerk, service observer, service order reviewer, 
service order typist, service order writer, service 
representative, special services clerk, statistical 
clerk, stenographer, stenographic reviewer, stub 
sorter, student representative, survey clerk, 
technical assistant, telephone saleslady, tele- 
type operator, teller, teller representative, and 
training records clerk. 

10. Messrs. A. R. Mosher, J. E. McGuire, 
W. J. Smith, F. D. Nicoll, J. A. Querido, R. 
Rice and R. Horner, and Miss Frances Scho- 
field, and the Canadian Brotherhood of Rail- 
way Employees and Other Transport Workers, 
Division No. 280, for the employees of the 
CornwaUis Inn, Canadian Pacific Railway 
Company, Kcntville, N.S. Excluded from the 
bargaining unit were the manager, assistant 
manager, chief clerk, manager's secretarj% 
head housekeeper, chief steward, chef, head 
waiter, chief engineer, head porter and em- 
ployees of the accountant's office. 

11. Messrs. A. McKenzie, R. Remlinger, 
Thomas G. Skinner and W. S. Scott and Gay- 
port Employees' Association for the unlicensed 
personnel employed by Gayport Shipping 
Limited, Toronto, Ontario, on the vessels SS 
"Britamoil", SS "Britamolene", SS "Britamoco" 
and SS "Britamette". 

12. Mr. Alfred A. Deacon and Western Asso- 
ciation of Mechanical and Electrical Engineers, 
Local No. 7, for employees of the Sterling 
Collieries Company, Limited, Edmonton, Al- 
berta, employed at its mine at Stereo, Alberta. 
The superintendent, master mechanic, time- 
keeper, clerk, storekeeper, assistant storekeeper, 
warehouseman, cook, bull cook, waitress, night 
watchmen, locomotive engineers, dragline 
operator, dragline fireman, dragline craneman 
and dinkey engineers were excluded from the 
bargaining unit. 



1947] 



INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION 



33 



Application for Certification Rejected 

Canadian Airline Dispatchers Association 
and Canadian Pacific Airlines, Montreal, P.Q., 
(L.G., Oct., 1946, p. 1419). Following a hearing 
of the interested parties the Board rejected 
the application. Reasons for Judgment in this 
case appear below: 

Representation Vote Ordered 

Brotherhood of Maintenance-oj-Way 
Employees and Roland McMillan, Canadian 
Pacific Railway Coal Contractor, Winnipeg, 
Manitoba (L.G., June, 1946, p. 752). Mr. 
R. H. Hooper, Industrial Relations Officer, 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, was appointed by the 
Board to act as Returning Officer in a vote 
of the employees of Roland McMillan, 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, employed as coalmen on 
the Manitoba and Saskatchewan Districts of 
the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Coal 
chute operators employed on a sub-contract 
basis and the employees of such sub- 
contractors were excluded from the eligible 
voters list. 

Application for Certification Withdrawn 

Canadian Brotherhood of Railway Employees 
and Other Transport Workers, Division 209, 
and National Harbours Board, Montreal, P.Q. 
(L.G., Nov., 1946, p. 1558). On the request 
of the General Representative of the Canadian 
Brotherhood of Railway Employees and Other 
Transport Workers the application for cer- 
tification of bargaining representatives on 
behalf of certain employees of the National 
Harbours Board, Montreal, P.Q., was with- 
drawn. 

Decisions in Appeal Cases 

1. Following a hearing of the interested 
parties the Board denied the appeal of 



Penman's Limited, Paris, Ontario, from an 
oral decision of the Ontario Labour Relations 
Board given at a hearing of the case on 
September 24, 1946, permitting the United 
Textile Workers of America, Local 153, to 
amend its application for certification of 
bargaining representatives to cover only the 
Paris, Ontario, plant of the Company. 

Reasons for Judgment will be given at a 
later date. 

2. On December 11, 1946, the Board 
dismissed the appeal of Yale and Towne 
Manufacturing Company (Canadian Division), 
St. Catharines, Ontario, from a decision of 
the Ontario Labour Relations Board ordering 
a vote of the employees of the Company. 

Reasons for Judgment will be given later. 

3. Following a hearing of the interested 
parties the Board denied the appeal of the 
Glass Bottle Blowers Association of the United 
States and Canada from a decision of the 
Ontario Labour Relations Board ordering a 
new vote of employees of Anchor Cap and 
Closure Corporation of Canada, Toronto, 
Ontario, for the reason that the United 
Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of 
America, had disseminated election propa- 
ganda on the occasion of an earlier vote 
during the period of 72 hours before the vote, 
within which period such propaganda was 
prohibited by direction of the Ontario Board. 

The Board issued Reasons for Judgment 
in four cases, two of which are covered by 
the same Reasons for Judgment. The texts 
of the Reasons for Judgment are given 
below: — 

Reasons for Judgment in Other Appeal Cases 

Reasons for Judgment in two cases dealt 
with by the Board at its November sittings 
and summarized in the December, 1946, issue 
of the Labour Gazette are given below: — 



Appeal No. 1, Between: Ottawa Hydro-Electric Commission, Appellant 
(Respondent) and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, 
Local 1440, Respondent (Petitioner). 

Appeal No. 2, Between: The Corporation of the Village of Forest Hill, 
Appellant (Respondent) and National Organization of Civic, Utility 
and Electrical Workers, Branch No. 1, Respondent (Petitioner). 



The Board consisted of the Vice-Chairman 
and Messrs. Complin, Hills, Mosher, Picard 
and Taylor. 

Reasons for Judgment 

These are appeals from decisions of the 
Ontario Labour Relations Board made on 
applications for certification of bargaining 

79014— 3£ 



representatives for employees of the appel- 
lants. The appeal in each instance is based 
on the contention that the appellant is not 
an employer to whom the provisions of the 
Wartime Labour Relations Regulations are 
applicable. 

The appellant in Appeal No. 1, the Ottawa 
Hydro-Electric Commission, is a Commission 



34 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



created or established by the City of Ottawa 
pursuant to the Public Utilities Act of Ontario 
for the control and management of the works 
undertaken and maintained by the Corpora- 
tion of the City of Ottawa for distribution 
and supply of electrical power. 

The appellant in Appeal No. 2 is a muni- 
cipal corporation in the Province of Ontario, 
and the employees with respect to whom 
certification of bargaining representatives is 
applied for are employed upon or in con- 
nection with the electrical power distribution 
system operated by the municipal corporation. 

The appellants rely upon the provisions of 
section ten of the Labour Relations Board Act 
of Ontario, Chapter 29, Statutes of Ontario, 
1944, as exempting them from the applica- 
tion of the Wartime Labour Relations Regu- 
lations. The relevant provisions of section 
ten of the Act provide that the Act shall not 
apply to any municipal corporation or any 
board or commission created or established by 
a municipal corporation pursuant to statutory 
authority unless such municipal corporation, 
board or commission has by by-law, if it has 
the power to pass by-laws, or by resolution or 
minute, declared that the said Act is appli- 
cable thereto and to its employees or any 
section thereof. Neither appellant has passed 
a by-law, resolution or minute declaring the 
said Act applicable to its employees. 

The Labour Relations Board Act of Ontario 
and Orders in Council enacted thereunder 
make applicable the provisions of the War- 
time Labour Relations Regulations, enacted 
by the Governor in Council under the 
authority of the War Measures Act, to 
employers and their employees who are within 
the legislative jurisdiction of the province in 
matters covered by the Regulations, subject 
to the exceptions contained in section ten of 
the Act. The Act and Orders in Council 
passed thereunder also establish the Ontario 
Labour Relations Board to administer the 
Wartime Labour Relations Regulations in the 
application thereof to employers and em- 
ployees within the legislative jurisdiction of 
the province, as provided in the Act. The Act 
also empowers that Board to exercise such 
powers as may be vested in it under the 
authority of the War Measures Act. 

Subsection two of section four of the Labour 
Relations Board Act provides: 

(2) The Board shall exercise such powers 
and perform such duties as may be vested in 
or imposed upon it by this Act, the War 
Measures Act (Canada) or any other Act of 
this legislature, or any regulation or agree- 
ment made under or pursuant to any such 
Acts. 

The Wartime Labour Relations Regulations 
provide that the Regulations shall apply, inter 
alia, to employees who are employed upon or 



in connection with a work, undertaking or 
business that is essential to the efficient 
prosecution of the war, and to the employers 
of all such employees in their relations with 
such employees. Subsection two of section 
three of the Regulations provides that em- 
ployees employed upon or in connection with 
a work, undertaking or business described in 
Schedule "A" to the Regulations, and no 
others, shall be deemed to be employed in 
connection with a work, undertaking or 
business that is essential to the prosecution of 
the war. 

Schedule "A" to the Regulations includes, as 
Item 14, "public service utilities, including 
gas, electric, water and power works, telegraph 
and telephone lines". 

The Wartime Labour Relations Regulations 
enacted under the War Measures Act have 
been continued in effect in virtue of Order in 
Council P.C. 7414 of December 28, 1945, 
passed pursuant to section five of The 
National Emergency Transitional Powers Act, 
1945. 

The appellants contend that the term 
"public service utilities" as appearing in the 
Schedule should be interpreted as being 
limited in its application to privately-owned 
public service utilities. 

The words "work, undertaking or business" 
are wide enough to include an enterprise of 
any nature, and there is nothing in the term 
"public service utilities" which, in the opinion 
of the Board, would warrant an interpreta- 
tion restricting the application thereof to 
privately-owned public service utilities. 

The Board finds, therefore, that the 
employees affected by each of the applications 
for certification involved in these appeals are 
employed upon or in connection with works 
or undertakings of the appellants that have 
been specifically designated as war industries 
under the Wartime Labour Relations Regula- 
tions. Consequently, the provisions of the 
Regulations apply to such employees and to 
their employers, the appellants, in their rela- 
tions with such employees without regard for 
the provisions of section ten of the Labour 
Relations Board Act. 

Order in Council P.C. 2911 of April 27, 1944, 
enacted under the authority of the War 
Measures Act, vests in the Ontario Labour 
Relations Board the powers of the Wartime 
Labour Relations Board under the Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations with respect to 
employees in the Province of Ontario 
employed upon or in connection with a work, 
undertaking or business described in Schedule 
"A" to the Regulations, and their employers. 

Section four of the Labour Relations Board 
Act of Ontario authorizes the Ontario Board 
to exercise the powers and perform the duties 



1947] 



INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION 



35 



which may be vested in it by the War 
Measures Act. 

In the opinion of the Board, therefore, the 
Ontario Board has jurisdiction to entertain 
the applications for certification that are the 
subject matters of these appeals. 

In the result the appeals are dismissed. 

(Sgd.) A. H. Brown, 
Vice-Chairman for the Board. 

G. C. Medcalf, Esq. K.C. 

for the Appellant, Ottawa Hydro-Electric 

Commission. 



Melville Grant, Esq., 

for the appellant, The Corporation of the 
Village of Forest Hill, Ontario. 
C. L. Dubin, Esq., 
J. B. Cochrane, Esq., 
for the Respondent, International Brother- 
hood of Electrical Workers, Local 1440. 
T. F. Stevenson, Esq., 
for the Respondent, Branch No. 1, National 
Organization of Civic, Utility and Elec- 
trical Workers. 

Dated at Ottawa, December 12, 1946. 



Between: Northern Electric Company Limited, Toronto, Appellant (Respond- 
ent) and United Telephone Workers of Canada, Local 4, Respondent 
(Petitioner). 



The Board consisted of the Vice-Chairman 
and Messrs. Complin, Hills, Mosher, Picard 
and Taylor. 

Reasons for Judgment 

By leave of the Ontario Board, this is an 
appeal from the decision of that Board certi- 
fying bargaining representatives for two 
separate units of employees of the appellant 
company. Unit No. 1 includes all employees 
of the Company working or having their head- 
quarters in Toronto, employed in connection 
with the repair, distribution, inspection or 
installation of telephone equipment, including 
the staffs of the telephone contract shop, ware- 
house and telephone installation department, 
subject to certain exclusions; and Unit No. 2 
consists of all office employees of the Company 
employed in its premises at 1090 Shaw St., 
Toronto, subject to certain exclusions. 

On the initial petition of the respondent 
union to the Ontario Board, certification was 
asked for bargaining representatives for one 
unit only consisting of all employees included 
in Units Nos. 1 and 2. It appears from the 
proceedings on the petition before the Ontario 
Board that at the hearing before that Board 
the Company opposed certification on the 
ground that the one unit of employees in 
respect of which certification was requested 
was inappropriate. The Company claimed that 
the office employees should not be included 
with other employees, and also claimed that 
the employees in the telephone contract shop 
and warehouse should not be included in the 
same bargaining unit with the employees in 
the installation department because of differ- 
ences in the nature of their work and working 
conditions. 

Following the hearing, the Ontario Board 
invited the respondent union to arrange for 
the election of separate bargaining representa- 
tives for the office employees only. The 



respondent did so and evidence of the due 
election of bargaining representatives for the 
office employees of the Company was filed 
with the Board. The Ontario Board thereupon, 
without a further hearing or further notice to 
the Company, and having satisfied itself that 
in each case the majority of the employees in 
each unit were members of the respondent 
union, issued certifications for bargaining repre- 
sentatives for each of the units of employees, 
Nos. 1 and 2, described above. 

The appellant contends that as the Ontario 
Board evidently found the original bargaining 
unit to be inappropriate it should have dis- 
missed the petition. It further contends that 
in any event no opportunity was given to the 
Company to make representations following 
the filing with the Board of evidence of the 
election of new bargaining representatives for 
the unit of office employees; and it contends 
that in any event Unit No. 1 is inappropriate 
as the employees in the telephone contract shop 
and warehouse and those in the installation 
department should not be included in the one 
bargaining unit. 

In view of the report of the investigating 
officer of the Ontario Board, which was 
accepted by the Ontario Board, it is clear that 
in the case of each unit of employees for 
which certification was granted the majority 
of employees therein are members of the 
respondent union. Therefore, in the opinion 
of this Board, it was within the authority of 
the Ontario Board in certifying bargaining 
representatives for bargaining unit No. 1, to 
exclude from the unit the office employees as 
inappropriate for inclusion therein. Moreover, 
this Board is of the opinion that the unit in 
question is appropriate and that there is no 
valid reason for subdividing this bargaining 
unit further as between employees in the tele- 
phone contract shop and warehouse, on the one 
hand, and the employees in the installation 



36 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



department on the other hand. Their interests 
are not divergent or incapable of being ade- 
quately represented by a common group of 
bargaining representatives. 

The procedure followed by the Ontario 
Board in connection with the certification of a 
separate group of bargaining representatives 
for office employees of the Company, who 
were only selected after the hearing before 
that Board, raises some difficulties, however. 
It may be assumed that the Ontario Board 
accepted the filing of evidence of the appoint- 
ment of new and separate bargaining repre- 
sentatives for the office employees as in effect 
a further petition for certification of bargain- 
ing representatives with respect to this group 
of employees. No doubt, that Board should 
in accordance with usual practice have advised 
the Company of the action so taken and have 
given the Company the opportunity to make 
further representations if it desired to do so. 
That this was not done was due no doubt to 
the opinion that all issues involved in estab- 
lishing an office employee unit had already 
been argued before the Board. 

However, on the appeal to this Board the 
Company was afforded the opportunity to 
make full representations with respect to the 
merits of this certification and to present 
arguments on the appropriateness of the unit. 
No question was raised by the Company as to 
the majority of employees in the bargaining 
unit being members of the respondent union, 



or the regularity of the appointment of bar- 
gaining representatives. These were sub- 
stantiated by the report of the Ontario Board's 
investigating officer. 

Therefore, in the circumstances, the oppor- 
tunity having been afforded to the Company 
to make representations and give evidence on 
the merits of the certifications and having 
regard for the provisions of Section 47 of the 
Wartime Labour Relations Regulations, which 
provides that "no proceeding under these 
Regulations shall be deemed invalid by reason 
of any defect of form or any technical irregu- 
larity," this Board is of the opinion that the 
certifications should not be disturbed. 

It would appear that to refer the matter 
back to the Ontario Board, before which body 
a complete repetition of the representations 
made on appeal to this Board would be made 
with attendant unnecessary expense and delay 
for both parties, would not serve any useful 
purpose or effect the result. 

Accordingly, the appeal is dismissed. 

(Sgd.) A. H. Brown, 
Vice-Chair man for the Board. 

H. McD. Sparks, Esq., 
R. D. Williams, Esq., 

for the Appellant. 
R. G. Geddes, Esq., 
jor the Respondent. 

Dated at Ottawa, December 12, 1946. 



Between: David Spencer, Limited, Victoria, B.C., Appellant (Respondent) 
and Retail Meat Employees' Federal Union Local 222, Respondent 
(Applicant) . 



The Board consisted of the Vice-Chairman 
and Messrs. Complin, Hills, Mosher, Picard 
and Taylor. 

Reasons for Judgment 

This is an appeal from a decision of the 
Minister of Labour for British Columbia 
certifying bargaining representatives selected 
by the respondent union to act for employees 
of the appellant company employed at the 
fresh meat counter, the cooler, the sausage 
kitchen, the butter counter, the delicatessen 
counter, the provisions counter and the parcel 
wrapping assembly for these sections of the 
store. The number of employees in the 
proposed bargaining unit is 31 out of a total 
of between 800 and 900 employees in the 
store. The store is a departmental store 
which handles and provides a wide variety 
of merchandise and services. 

The appellant appeals on the ground, among 
others, that the unit of employees is not an 
appropriate unit for collective bargaining in 



that the employees do not constitute a craft 
group and the unit is otherwise inappropriate 
as comprising only a small group of employees 
in the store whose interests are not distin- 
guishable for the purposes of collective bar- 
gaining from the interests of other employees 
engaged in similar work in other departments 
of the store. 

While the union in making application for 
certification in the first instance claimed that 
the unit was a craft unit, it subsequently 
abandoned this claim and amended its appli- 
cation to describe the proposed unit as a 
subdivision of the plant unit. At the hearing 
of the appeal before this Board, the repre- 
sentative of the respondent union maintained 
nevertheless that the unit was a craft unit 
and if not, that the unit was in any event 
appropriate as a subdivision of the store unit. 

This Board is of the opinion that the claim 
for recognition as a craft group cannot be 
sustained in view of the diverse classifications 
of employees included in the unit comprising 



1947] 



INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION 



37 



clerks, butchers, checkers, meat cutters and 
wrappers. 

The Board is not satisfied that such differ- 
ences in the kind of work carried on or skills 
required or working conditions or other terms 
of employment as between employees in the 
proposed bargaining unit, and the employees 
in other departments of the store as have 
been brought to its attention warrant the 
establishment of a separate bargaining • unit 
for the purpose of carrying on collective 
bargaining on behalf of these employees. If 
recognition were accorded to this unit as a 
unit appropriate for collective bargaining, it 
would be difficult to deny similar recognition 
to bargaining units of employees in each of 
the other departments of the store handling 
different types of merchandise. 

In the opinion of the Board, it would not 
be in the interests of either employees or the 
employer, nor in the public interest, to 



establish a multiplicity of bargaining units 
within one establishment of an employer for 
the purpose of compulsory collective bargain- 
ing on the grounds that are put forward in 
this instance. 

The Board, therefore, finds that the unit, 
with respect to which certification has been 
granted, is not appropriate as a unit for 
collective bargaining in the circumstances. 

The appeal is allowed and the certification 
is set aside. 

(Sgd.) A. H. Brown, 
Vice-Chairman for the Board. 

W. S. Owen, Esq, K.C, 

for {he Appellant. 

J. A. Sullivan, Esq, 
A. E. Hemming, Esq, 

for the Respondent. 

Dated at Ottawa, December 13, 1946. 



Between: Canadian Air Line Dispatchers Association, Applicant and 
Canadian Pacific Air Lines Limited, Montreal, Respondent and Order 
of Railroad Telegraphers, System Division No. 7, Intervener. 



The Board consisted of the Vice-Chairman 
and Messrs. Complin, Hills, Mosher, Picard 
and Taylor. 

Reasons for Judgment 

The applicant applies for certification of 
bargaining representatives for a unit of 
employees of Canadian Pacific Air Lines 
Limited comprising the following classifica- 
tions: station chief dispatchers, dispatchers, 
dispatcher-operators and dispatch clerks. The 
applicant claims that this unit constitutes a 
craft group. 

The intervener in opposing the application 
states that it represents for collective bargain- 
ing all employees in the foregoing classifica- 
tions, with the exception of station chief 
dispatchers and dispatch clerks. There is a 
collective agreement in effect between 'the 
respondent Company and the intervener, on 
behalf of dispatchers, operator-dispatchers, 
radio operators, radio operator agents, agents 
and assistant agents at air stations, which has 
been in effect since November 1, 1944. The 
intervener claims that this unit of employees 
consisting of air station operation personnel 
is appropriate for collective bargaining and 
should not be further subdivided. 

The Company opposes the application on 
the ground that the present bargaining unit 
is appropriate and that the proposed sub- 
division thereof, involving the complete 
segregation of dispatch personnel from other 



related classifications involved in air station 
operation, would not be a practical division 
in view of the nature of the Company's oper- 
ations. It points out that at a number of 
stations the duties of dispatcher, radio oper- 
ator and agent are combined and handled by 
one or more persons instead of by three 
separate persons. 

In reply, the applicant alleges that a 
dispatcher's duties are of a specialized nature 
involving the responsibility of air flights in 
the dispatcher's division and a thorough 
knowledge of all matters affecting the flying 
operations of an airline. The applicant 
claims that the qualifications for the position 
do not necessarily involve radio operator 
skills, that dispatchers are not necessarily 
drawn from the ranks of radio operators, and 
that the dispatchers should be accorded recog- 
nition as a separate bargaining unit. The 
applicant also claims that the interests of 
dispatchers have not been satisfactorily repre- 
sented by the intervener. 

The Board is of the opinion that substantial 
grounds should be shown to warrant the 
breaking down of an existing bargaining unit 
into smaller subdivisions thereof. Considering 
that the employees affected by the present 
application have been accorded recognition 
for collective bargaining in the bargaining 
unit as now constituted, and the objections 
advanced towards the establishment of a 
separate bargaining unit at this time, the 



38 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



Board is not satisfied that in the present 
circumstances a new bergaining unit should 
be established or that the proposed bargaining 
unit is more appropriate for collective bargain- 
ing. Moreover, the Board is not prepared to 
find on information before it that the interests 
of the employees in the proposed bargaining 
unit require the establishment of a separate 
bargaining unit and the appointment of 
separate bargaining representatives in order to 
properly represent their interests for the pur- 
pose of collective bargaining with the 
employer. 



The application is rejected accordingly. 

(Sgd.) A. H. Brown, 
Vice-Chairman for the Board. 
W. F. Mills, 
A. M. Craig, 

for the applicant. 
C. H. Dickins, 
S. M. Gossage, 

for the respondent. 
W. H. Phillips, 
L. B. Arscott, 

for the intervener. 

Dated at Ottawa, December 13, 1946. 



Between: Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company (Canadian Division), St. 
Catharines, Ontario. Appellant (Respondent) and United Electrical 
Radio & Machine Workers of America, Local 529. Respondent 
(Petitioner). 



The Board consisted of the Vice-Chairman 
and Messrs. Complin, Hills, Mosher, Picard 
and Taylor. 

Reasons for Judgment 

This is an application for leave to appeal 
and an appeal from the decision of the 
Ontario Labour Relations Board ordering a 
vote of employees of the appellant company 
on a petition for certification of bargaining 
representatives. The grounds of appeal 
advanced are: — 

(1) that a prima facie case for a vote was 
not established; 

(2) that the evidence did not establish that 
a majority of the employees were 
members of the union; 

(3) that the majority was made up in 
part of former members of other unions 
and discharged members of the armed 
forces who were given free union 
membership cards; 

(4) that the Ontario Board would not 
allow the company or its counsel to 
examine the cards, ledgers and records 
of the union; 

(5) that the result of the Ontario Board's 
check, if any, which has not been 
disclosed to the company, does not 
support the decision to take a vote; 

(6) 1 that the request of company counsel 
to have union witnesses sworn and 
evidence transcribed should have been 
granted ; 

(7) that bargaining representatives were not 
properly appointed. 

The records of the Ontario Board on this 
petition show that two checks were made by 



the investigating officer of that Board with 
respect to the membership strength of the 
respondent union among the employees in the 
proposed bargaining unit and against company 
payroll lists, such checks being made as of 
July 10, 1946, the date of the petition, and 
again as of August 12, 1946. The investigating 
officer, in reporting to the Ontario Board on 
the result of each such check, reported that 
a majority of the employees in the bargaining 
unit were members of the respondent union. 

The union states that while union initia- 
tion fees were waived in respect to several 
employees in the bargaining unit who had 
been members of other unions or were war 
veterans, this is a common practice followed 
by the union and other unions and that 
although initiation fees were waived in these 
instances, union membership dues were not 
waived in any instance and were paid in 
each instance by all employees in the bargain- 
ing unit who had been accepted as members 
of the union and shown 1 in the union's records 
as members. 

In view of the report of its investigating 
officer which was accepted by the Ontario 
Board, that Board was warranted in proceed- 
ing as it did in this case to order a vote 
of the employees in the bargaining unit. On 
this vote, the majority of employees in the 
bargaining unit voted in favour of the 
respondent union. 

In the opinion of this Board, on the 
evidence furnished, the bargaining representa- 
tives were duly appointed. 

This Board has held on a number of occa- 
sions that company representatives have not 
a right to examine the membership records 
of a union on an application of this nature. 



1947] 



INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION 



39 



Under the Regulations, the duty rests on the 
Board to make such examination as it deems 
advisable of union records and other relevant 
records in order to determine the merits of 
the petition. The company was afforded full 
opportunity of making representations and 
giving evidence before the Ontario Board with 
respect to the matters involved in the petition, 
as is provided in the Regulations. 



In view of the foregoing, leave to appeal is 
granted but the appeal is dismissed. 

(Sgd.) A. H. Brown, 
Vice-Chairman for the Board. 
J. L. G. Keogh, Esq., 

jor the Appellant. 
R. Russell, Esq., 

for the Respondent. 
Dated at Ottawa, January 14, 1947. 



Between: Le Syndicat National des Ghantiers Maritimes de Sorel, Appellant 
(Applicant) and Marine Industries Limited, Sorel, P.Q., Respondent 
and Le Gonseil des Metiers de la Metallurgie des Employes de la 
Marine Industries, Respondent (Intervener). 



The Board consisted of the Vice-Chairman 
and Messrs. Best, Complin, Hills, and Taylor. 

Reasons for Judgment 

This is an application for leave to appeal 
and an appeal from a decision of the Quebec 
Wartime Labour Relations Board dismissing 
the application of the appellant Syndicat for 
certification of bargaining representatives. 

The Quebec Board dismissed the application 
on the ground that there was in existence a 
collective agreement between the respondent 
company and the respondent council, the 
existence of which was a bar to consideration 
of a new application for certification until the 
agreement, which was dated February 27, 1946, 
had run for a period of at least ten months. 

A perusal of the record of proceedings before 
the Quebec Board discloses that the respondent 
company and the respondent council were 
parties to an agreement which, having run for 
a period of a year and following due notice 
of termination, was terminated on January 29, 
1946. The appellant Syndicate application for 
certification was made on January 22, 1946, 
which was at a time after the expiry of ten 
months after the commencement of the term 
of the existing collective agreement as pro- 
vided in section nine of the Regulations. The 
fact that while this application was pending 
the parties to the former agreement negotiated 
a new agreement does not in the circumstances 
operate as a bar to the consideration of the 
application of the appellant by the Board nor 
to the certification of new bargaining repre- 
sentatives, if the appellant is otherwise entitled 
to certification under the Regulations. 

In its application for certification the 
appellant claimed to have the support of 51 
per cent of the 1,100 or more employees of 
the company in the bargaining unit. However, 



the report of the investigating officer of the 
Provincial Board is to the effect that on two 
separate checks made by him on behalf of the 
Quebec Board, the Syndicat had a membership 
strength, including written authorizations, of 
not more than 30 per cent of the employees 
in the bargaining unit. 

The appellant contends, however, that a vote 
of the employees in the bargaining unit should 
be ordered, notwithstanding its failure to show 
that it has the support of a prima facie ma- 
jority of the employees in the bargaining unit. 
The grounds of this contention are that due to 
pressure, intimidation and discrimination exer- 
cised by the company among the employees to 
the prejudice of the appellant Syndicat, and by 
other companies among their employees in the 
same city under similar ownership, the em- 
ployees were unwilling to join the organization. 
The appellant asserts, however, that if a secret 
ballot were taken, it would be shown to have 
the support of the majority of the employees 
in the bargaining unit. 

Both the company and the respondent coun- 
cil deny these allegations of the appellant. It 
was stated by both these parties that in the 
case of the other companies operated under 
the same ownership in the same city there are 
agreements in effect between the company and 
locals of the National Syndicat and that this 
fact in itself refutes the appellant's assertion 
that such other companies have been dis- 
criminating against the appellant union. 

In the opinion of the Board the allegations 
of the appellant that discrimination and 
coercion have been shown or exercised by the 
company against the appellant union and in 
favour of the respondent union have not been 
satisfactorily substantiated by the appellant 
and do not warrant the Board ordering a 
vote on this ground. As the appellant also 



79014—4 



40 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



failed to show that it had the support of a 
majority of employees in the bargaining unit, 
the appellant's application for certification or 
in the alternative for the taking of a vote by 
the Board is denied. 

Accordingly, while the application for leave 
to appeal is granted, the appeal is dismissed. 

(Sgd.) A. H. Brown, 
Vice-Chairman for the Board. 



T. Lbsperance, Esq., 

for the Appellant (Applicant). 
A. Simard, Esq., 
E. Bernard, Esq., 

for the Respondent. 
E. Larose, Esq., 
R. Walsh, Esq., 
Z. Gauthier, Esq., 

for the Respondent (Intervener). 

Dated at Ottawa, December 11, 1946. 



Between: The Lockeport Company Division of National Sea Products 
Limited, Lockeport, N.S., Appellant (Respondent) and Canadian 
Fish Handlers' Union, Local No. 7, Respondent (Applicant). 



The Board consisted of the Vice-Chairman 
and Messrs. Best, Complin, Hills, and Taylor. 

Reasons for Judgment 

By leave of the Nova Scotia Wartime 
Labour Relations Board, this is an appeal by 
the company against the decision of that 
Board certifying bargaining representatives 
elected by the union to act on behalf of a 
bargaining unit of employees of the company. 

The principal grounds advanced by the 
appellant company are: (1) that at the time 
of electing bargaining representatives and at 
the time of making application for their 
certification, a majority of the employees 
affected by the application were not members 
of the union; (2) that the election of bargain- 
ing representatives was, therefore, not valid 
and proper under the Regulations; (3) that 
in the alternative a majority of the employees 
affected did not participate in the election of 
bargaining representatives. 

The record of proceedings of the Nova 
Scotia Board discloses that 171 employees 
were affected by , the application ; that 82 
employees (less than 50 per cent) were 
members of the union as of July 19, the date 
of the application; that 12 or 13 additional 
employees joined the union following the date 
of application. The accuracy of these figures 
is not seriously contested by the union. 

As the union did not, in making application 
for certification of bargaining representatives, 
have the support of the majority of emploj T ees 
in the bargaining unit, as required under the 



Regulations, this Board is of opinion that the 
application should have been rejected by the 
Nova Scotia Board. The practice in this 
matter is well settled, and the views of this 
Board on the matter are as set out in the 
case of the Northern Shirt Company, Limited 
(D.L.S. 7-594), where the Board held that a 
practice allowing the filing as evidence in 
support of an application membership cards 
obtained after the date of the application is 
not contemplated under the Regulations. 

It is clear that in making application for 
certification the union did not have as 
members, within the meaning of section five 
of the Regulations, a majority of the 
employees in the bargaining unit. Conse- 
quently the union did not have the requisite 
authority to elect or appoint bargaining 
representatives. 

For the foregoing reason the appeal is 
allowed and the certification granted by the 
Nova Scotia Board is set aside, but without 
prejudice to the making of a further applica- 
tion under the terms of the Regulations for 
certification of bargaining representatives with 
respect to the employees in the bargaining 
unit. 

(Sgd.) A. H. Brown, 
Vice-Chairman for the Board. 

E. G. Gowling, Esq., K.C., 

for the appellant. 
J. A. Sullivan, Esq., 

for the respondent. 

Dated at Ottawa, December 11, 1946. 



Between: Penmans Limited, Paris, Ontario. Appellant (Respondent) and 
United Textile Workers of America (A.F. of L.), Local 153 Respondent 
(Petitioner) and Harry Bauld Barrie Respondent (Intervener). 



The Board consisted of the Vice-Chairman 
and Messrs. Complin, Hills, Mosher, Picard 
and Taylor. 

Reasons for Judgment 

This is an application for leave to appeal 
from an oral decision of the Ontario Labour 
Relations Board permitting the respondent 
union to amend its petition for certification 



of bargaining representatives so as to limit 
the bargaining unit of employees affected to 
employees at the company plants at Paris, 
Ontario. 

The appellant company claims that the 
petition should have been rejected without 
further inquiry on the ground that on the 
face of it, the petition did not show that the 



1947] 



INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION 



41 



Ontario Board had jurisdiction to deal with 
the same and on the further ground that on 
the basis of the statements contained in the 
petition, bargaining representatives had not 
been properly elected by the respondent union 
and the petition should have, in any event, 
been dismissed on this ground. 

At the present time, the Ontario Board 
has the petition under consideration and 
investigation and no decision has as yet been 
made by that Board as to whether a vote of 
employees in the proposed bargaining unit 



should be directed or certification granted or 
the petition dismissed. 

In the opinion of the Board, the applica- 
tion for leave to appeal is premature and is 
accordingly refused. 

(Sgd.) A. H. Brown, 
Vice-Chairman for the Board. 
N. L. Matthews, Esq., 

for the Appellant. 
L. Roback, Esq., 

for the Respondent. 
Dated at Ottawa, January 14, 194 7 



Conciliation Proceedings Under the Wartime Labour Relations 

Regulations 






HP HE Wartime Labour Relations Regula- 
■*■ tions provide conciliation machinery 
to attempt settlement of disputes where 
negotiations for an agreement following certi- 
fication of bargaining representatives, or 
negotiations for the renewal of an existing 
agreement, have been unsucccessfuly continued 
for thirty days. Disputes of this nature are 
referred to the Minister of Labour by the 
Wartime Labour Relations Board (National) 
or by the Provincial Boards in their respective 
jurisdictions. A Conciliation Officer is then 
appointed to confer with the parties and 
endeavours to effect an agreement. If the 
Conciliation Officer is unable to bring about 
settlement of the matters in dispute and 
reports that in his view an agreement might 
be facilitated by the appointment of a Board 
of Conciliation, a Board is then established 
by the Minister of Labour. The duty of such 
a Board is to endeavour to effect an agree- 
ment between the parties on the matters in 
dispute and to report its findings and recom- 
mendations to the Minister. 



Assignment of Conciliation Officers 

During December, 1946, Conciliation Officers 
were assigned to confer with the parties in an 
attempt to effect an agreement in the follow- 
ing cases: 

The John Bertram & Sons Company Ltd., 
Dundas, Ont., and Patternmakers' Association 
of Hamilton & Vicinity (AFL-TLC), Mr. 
Wm. Dunn, Conciliation Officer. 

The Brown Boggs Foundry and Machine 
Co. Ltd., Hamilton, Ont., and Patternmakers' 
Association of Hamilton & Vicinity (AFL- 
TLC), Mr. Wm. Dunn, Conciliation Officer. 

Canadian Ohio Brass Company Ltd., 
Niagara Falls, Ont., and Local 819A, Inter- 
national Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers (CIO-CCL), Mr. F. J. Ainsborough, 
Conciliation Officer. 



The Great West Saddlery Company Ltd., 
Winnipeg, Man., and Local 430, Winnipeg 
Leather Workers' Union (CIO-CCL), Mr. 
T. J. Williams, Conciliation Officer. 

Halifax Shipyards Limited (Halifax and 
Dartmouth Plants), and Locals No. 1 and No. 
13, Industrial Union of Marine and Ship- 
building Workers of Canada (CCL), Mr. 
H. R. Pettigrove, Conciliation Officer. 

Keystone Transports Ltd., Montreal, P.Q. 
and Canadian Seamen's Union (TLC), 
Westmount, P.Q., Mr. R. Trepanier, Concilia- 
tion Officer. 

Modern City Dairy, Sydney, N.S., and Local 
No. 10, National Union of Dairy Workers 
(CCL), Mr. H. R. Pettigrove, Conciliation 
Officer. 

Smart-Turner Machine Co. Ltd., Hamilton, 
Ont., and Patternmakers' Association of 
Hamilton & Vicinity (AFL-TLC), Mr. Wm. 
Dunn, Conciliation Officer. 

Thermoid Mould & Tool Works, Welland, 
Ont., and Local 523, United Electrical, Radio 
& Machine Workers of America (CIO-CCL), 
Mr. H. Perkins, Conciliation Officer. 

Township of Tisdale, South Porcupine, Ont., 
and Timmins General Workers' Union (CCL), 
Mr. F. J. Ainsborough, Conciliation Officer. 

Agreements Facilitated by Conciliation Officers 
and Cases Withdrawn 

In the following cases, reports were received 
from Conciliation Officers indicating the 
successful completion of negotiations with the 
signing of an agreement or the withdrawal of 
the case : 

British American Oil Company Limited, 
Moose Jaw, Sask., and Local No. 5, National 
Union of Petroleum Workers (CCL), Mr. 
H. S. Johnstone, Conciliation Officer. 

British Columbia Motor Transportation 
Limited, Vancouver, B.C. and Division 101, 



79014— 4J 



42 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



Amalgamated Association of Street, Electric 
Railway and Motor Coach Employees (AFL- 
TLC), Mr. J. E. Eades, Conciliation Officer. 

Canadian Line Materials Limited, Scarboro 
Junction, Ont., and Patternmakers' Association 
of Toronto (AFL-TLC), Mr. Wm Dunn, 
Conciliation Officer. 

Welland Vale Manufacturing Co., St. 
Catharines, Ont., and Local 199, International 
Union, United Automobile, Aircraft and 
Agricultural Implement Workers of America 
(UAW-CIO), Mr. H. Perkins, Conciliation 
Officer. 

Western Rawhide and Harness Manufactur- 
ing Co., St. Boniface, Man., and Local 430, 
International Fur and Leather Workers' 
Union (CIO-CCL), Mr. T. J. Williams, 
Conciliation Officer. 

Boards Established 

During the month, Boards of Conciliation 
were established but not fully constituted as 
follows: 

The John Bertram & Sons Co. Ltd., Dundas, 
Ont., and Local 1740, International Association 
of Machinists (TLC), Mr. Wm Dunn, 
Conciliation Officer. 

John Duff & Sons, Ltd., Hamilton, Ont., 
and Local 320, United Packinghouse Workers 
of America (CIO-CCL), Mr. G. R. Fenwick, 
Conciliation Officer. 

Lakeshore Mines Limited, Kirkland Lake, 
Ont., and Local 240, International Union of 
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers (CIO-CCL), 
Mr. H. Perkins, Conciliation Officer. 

Boards Fully Constituted 

Gelling Engineering Limited. The Board of 
Conciliation established to deal with a dispute 
between Gelling Engineering Limited, Welland, 
Ontario, and Local 523, United Electrical, 
Radio & Machine Workers of America (CIO- 
CCL) was fully constituted on December 30 
with the appointment of Dr. A. Brady, 
Toronto, Ont., as Chairman of the Board who 
was appointed on the joint recommendation of 
the other two members of the Board. Mr. 
M. A. Seymour, K.C. of St. Catharines, Ont., 
and Dr. H. G. Forster of Welland, Ont., were 



appointed on the recommendation of the 
employer and employees respectively. 

7. Taxicab Companies (Emile Lanthier, etc.) . 
The Board of Conciliation established to deal 
with a dispute between the 7 Taxicab Com- 
panies (Emile Lanthier, etc.), Montreal, P.Q., 
and Local No. 4, Taxicab Drivers' Union 
(AFL-TLC) was fully constituted on Decem- 
ber 27, 1946, with the appointment of Judge 
C. E. Guerin, Montreal, P.Q., as Chairman of 
the Board who was appointed in the absence 
of a recommendation from the other two 
members of the Board. Mr. P. Meriot, 
Montreal, and Mr. J. J. Spector, K.C, 
Montreal, were appointed on the recom- 
mendation of the employer and employees 
respectively. 

Applications for Certification Under 
Investigation 

1. Canadian Brotherhood of Railway Em- 
ployees and Other Transport Workers, on 
behalf of the Office Staff, excluding the Chief 
Clerk, of the General Superintendent of Motive 
Power and Car Equipment, Canadian National 
Railways, Winnipeg, Man. 

2. Yellowknife District Miners Union, Local 
802, International Union of Mine, Mill and 
Smelterworkers on behalf of certain datal em- 
ployees of the Giant Yellowknife Gold Mines 
Limited, Yellowknife, N.W.T. 

3. International Association of Machinists 
on behalf of the Stores Department Employees, 
employed by the British Overseas Airways Cor- 
poration, in its Stores Department at Dorval 
Airport, Dorval, P.Q. 

4. Con Sub Local, Yellowknife District 
Miners' Union, Local 80S, International Union 
of Mine, Mill and Smelterworkers on behalf of 
certain datal employees of Con Mines, Yellow- 
knife, N.W.T. 

5. United Grain Elevator Workers' Union, 
Local Union 501, United Retail, Wholesale 
and Department Store Employees of America, 
on behalf of certain employees of the Alberta 
Wheat Pool, Elevator Department, Vancouver, 
B.C. 



Activities Under the Conciliation and Labour Act and Order in 

Council P.C. 4020 



/"OFFICERS of the Industrial Relations 
^-J Branch dealt with 8 industrial disputes 
during the -month of December, involving 
6,261 workpeople employed in 25 separate 
establishments. Of these, 6 were new disputes 
which originated during the month and 2 
were situations which had been unterminated 
as of November 30, and received further at- 



tention in December. These disputes were 
dealt with under the provisions of the Con- 
ciliation and Labour Act and under Order in 
Council P.C. 4020. They were thus distinct 
from and in addition to the Conciliation pro- 
ceedings described on previous pages, which 
developed under the Wartime Labour Re- 
lations Regulations. 



1947 



INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION 



43 



Industrial Relations Officers of the Depart- 
ment of Labour are stationed at Vancouver, 
Winnipeg, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, and 
Fredericton, N.B. The territory of the officer 
resident in Vancouver comprises British 
Columbia and Alberta; two officers stationed 
in Winnipeg cover the provinces of Saskat- 
chewan and Manitoba and Northwestern On- 
tario; three officers resident in Toronto con- 
fine their activities to Ontario and work in 
close collaboration with the Provincial Con- 
ciliation Service; two officers in Montreal are 
assigned to the Province of Quebec and the 
officer resident in Fredericton, N.B., represents 
the Department in the Maritime Provinces. 
The headquarters of the Industrial Relations 
Branch and the Director of the Industrial 
Relations and staff are situated in Ottawa. 
Industries 

Mining and Smelting, etc. 

Metal Mining 1 

Manufacturing 

Tobacco and Liquor 1 

Shipbuilding 1 

Non-metallic Minerals, Chemicals, 

etc 1 

Rubber Products 1 

Transportation and Public Utilities 
Water 1 

Service 

Business and Personal 1 

Nature of Dispute or Situation 

Threatened strike or lockout 1 

Controversy 2 

Arbitration 3 

Requests for services of Commis- 
sioners 2 

Predominant Cause or Object 

Increased wages and reduced hours 1 
Other causes affecting wages and 

working conditions 2 

Discharge of workers for union 

membership or activity 2 

Other union questions 1 

Discharge of workers for other 
than union activity 1 

Disposition 

Threatened strike averted by 

mediation 1 

Decision rendered in arbitration. . 1 
Referred to Wartime Labour Re- 
lations Board 1 

Other disposition 3 

Disposition pending 2 

Method of Settlement 

Conciliation or mediation 2 

Arbitration 1 

Administrative action 1 

Investigation only 2 

Settlement pending 2 



Brief summaries of some of the cases of 
chief interest follow: — 

Merchant Seamen, Great Lakes and St. 
Lawrence River. — The September, 1946, and 
previous issues of the Labour Gazette con- 
tained accounts of developments in connection 
with a dispute between various shipping com- 
panies operating vessels on the Great Lakes 
and St. Lawrence Waterways and the Canadian 
Seamen's Union, which resulted in strike 
action and the appointment of a Government 
Controller and an Industrial Disputes In- 
quiry Commissioner. The terms of settle- 
ment have already been reported. 

By Order in Council P.C. 5012, dated 
December 5, 1946, the authority of the Gov- 
ernment Controller was revoked and the 
custody and control of the business and opera- 
tion of the various shipping companies affected 
was revested in such companies. 

Oil Products Workers, Petrolia, Ontario. — 
Upon joint request of the parties, the Min- 
ister of Labour on December 7, 1946, ap- 
pointed His Honour Judge M. A. Miller, of 
Sarnia, as an independent arbitrator to settle 
a grievance arising out of the dismissal of an 
employee of Canadian Oil Companies, Limited, 
Petrolia, Ont. The union involved was the 
National Union of Petroleum Workers, Local 
No. 1 (CCL). The decision of the arbitrator 
was that the man in question had been dis- 
missed because of his failure to discharge his 
duty in the closing of certain valves after 
pumping operations, and that there was no 
evidence established that there was not reason- 
able cause for discharge or that there was 
discrimination against him. 

Rubber Products Workers, Bowmanville, 
Ont. — Upon joint application of the parties, 
the Minister of Labour on December 28, 1946, 
appointed His Honour Judge A. Cochrane, of 
Brampton, Ont., as Chairman of an Arbitra- 
tion Board to deal with a dispute between the 
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Bow- 
manville, Ont., and Local Union No. 189 of 
the United Rubber, Cork, Linoleum and 
Plastic Workers of America. The parties 
were in disagreement as to whether the com- 
pany was required to honour authorizations 
for the deduction of union dues from wages 
by virtue of a clause providing that their 
collective agreement would continue in force 
during the period of negotiations with regard 
to revisions requested by the union. The case 
had not been disposed of at the end of the 
period under review. 



Collective Agreements and Wage Schedules 



Recent Collective Agreements 



COLLECTIVE agreements received in the 
Department are outlined in the Labour 
Gazette from month to month. It is not pos- 
sible, because of limitation of space, to include 
all agreements received. The agreements are in 
most cases signed by representatives of the 
employers and workers, but schedules of rates 
of wages, hours of labour and other conditions 
of employment drawn up and verbally agreed 
to by representatives of the employers and 
workers are also included. 

Agreements made obligatory under the 
Collective Agreement Act in Quebec are sum- 
marized in a separate article following this. 

Mining, Non-Ferrous Smelting and Quarrying: 
Metal Mining 

Britannia Beach, B.C.— Britannia Mining 
and Smelting Company, Ltd. and the 
International Union op Mine, Mill and 
Smelter Workers, Local 663. 

Agreement to be in effect from October 21, 
1946, to October 20, 1947, and until superseded 
by a new agreement or until negotiations are 
broken off. This agreement is similar to the one 
previously in effect and summarized in the 
Labour Gazette, Feb. 1946, p. 183, with the 
following changes and additions: 

There shall be no discrimination or intimida- 
tion either by the company or the union because 
of membership or non-membership in the union. 
Hours of work: operation of the property to be 
on a basis of alternating 40-hour and 48-hour 
working weeks. Overtime at time and one-half 
for all work in excess of 44 hours per week. 
Employees on day rates (with certain excep- 
tions) to be paid time and one-half for work 
over 8 hours per day. Vacation: after one 
year's service with the company 6 days with 
pay, with an additional day for each additional 
year of service up to the maximum of 12 days 
after 7 years' service (an employee must work 
a minimum of 280 days or the equivalent in the 
year to be eligible for vacation). 

New daily wage rates for certain classes: 
underground — miner (shaft) $8.01, (other) 
$7.51; mucker, nipper, trammer $6.85; pipeman, 
trackman $7.35; timbermen $7.51 and $8.01; 
helpers $6.85, crusherman $7.85; hoistmen $7.35 
and $7.85; skiptenders $6.85 to $7.35. Surface: 
shops — steel sharpener $7.85, blacksmiths $7.60 
and $8.10, helpers $6.85 and $7.10; machinists, 
mechanics, electricians $7.35 to $8.10; carpen- 
ters, plumbers $7.60 and $8J10, helpers, $6.85; 
mill operators, cranemen $7.35, machinist $8.10, 
foundry moulder $8.10, helper $6.85, general 
labourer $6.60. Boys first year $3.27 to $6.60, 



underground (18 years) $6.85. These rates in- 
clude two 25 cent copper bonuses to be paid for 
9 months irrespective of the market price of 
copper. The continuance of these bonuses and 
additional ones are contingent upon the average 
monthly price of Export 'Refinery copper at 
New York. The company also will pay shift 
differentials of 3c per hour on the second shift 
and 5 cents per hour on the third or night shift. 

Manufacturing: Vegetable Foods 

Keewatin, Ont. — Lake of the Woods Milling 
Company Ltd. and the Canadian Flour 
Millers' Union, Assembly No. 1. 

Agreement to be in effect from April 19, 1946, 
to April 17, 1947, and thereafter from year to 
year, subject to 60 days' notice. This agree- 
ment is similar to the one previously in effect 
and summarized in the Larour Gazette, Dec. 
1945, p. 1821, with the following change. 

Vacation: formerly one week with pay after 
one year's continuous service with the company, 
2 weeks with pay after 5 years' service, to 
which now is added 3 weeks with pay after 25 
years' service. 

Manufacturing: Fur and Leather Products 

Toronto, Ont. — The Independent Furriers' 
Association and the International Fur 
and Leather Workers' Union, Locals 35, 
40 and 65. 

Agreement to be in effect from April 30, 1946, 
to April 30, 1948, or until such time as a new 
agreement has been made. This agreement is 
similar to the one previously in effect and 
summarized in the Labour Gazette, January 
1945, p. 68, with the following changes. 

Check-off: employers agree to check-off for 
union dues upon the employee's authorization. 

There shall be a general increase of wages of 
15 per cent, retroactive to April 30, 1946. 
Minimum weekly wage rates (which apply 
equally to male and female employees) have 
been increased 20 per cent, and are now as 
follows: cutters, (first class) $55.20, (second 
class) $48. operators and finishers $42 and $36, 
blockers and nailers $33.60, after 5 years $39.60; 
assistant finishers and tapers $27.60; lining 
cutters shall be classed and receive the same 
wage as second class finishers. Apprentices: the 
ratio shall be one for every 10 employees or 
greater portion thereof. Trial period shall be 
up to 3 months. The apprentice period shall be 
18 months at which time he or she shall attain 
the standing of second class as per the minimum 
wage scale of the agreement. The starting rate 
is not to be less than $18 per week, with in- 
creases each 3 months of $2 per week during 
the apprenticeship period. 



44 



COLLECTIVE AGREEMENTS AND WAGE SCHEDULES 



45 



Manufacturing: Pulp and Paper 

Hull, P.Q.— The E. B. Eddy Company and 

the International Brotherhood of Paper 

Makers (Locals 35 and 243) and the 

International Brotherhood of Pulp, 

Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers 

(Local 50) 

Agreement to be in effect from May 1, 1946, 

to May 1, 1947, and thereafter from year* to 

year subject to 30 days' notice. This agreement 

is similar to the one previously in effect and 

summarized in the Labour Gazette, June, 1944, 

p. 752 with the following additions: 

Vacations — one week with pay for employees 
with one year's service with the company, 2 
weeks with pay for those with 5 or more years 
service. The four specified statutory holidays 
will be paid holidays for employees with 90 
days' service. 

Hourly wage rates for certain classes — 
machine tenders $1.10 to $1.19, back tenders 90 
cents to 98 cents, third hands 73 cents to 83 
cents, fourth hands 69 and 72 cents, fifth hands 

69 cents, plug rolls and labourers 65 cents, 
beater engineers 90 cents to $1.17, colour men 
76 and 83 cents, sizeman 76 cents, beaterman- 
dumper 75 cents, beaterman 73 cents, finishing- 
cuttermen 68 and 70 cents, rewinder operators 
68 and 69 cents, trimmer operators 69 and 76 
cents, broke hustlers 65 cents, female sorters 44 
to 50 cents, female checkers 59 and 65 cents. 

Ottawa, Ont.— The E. B. Eddy Company and 
the International Brotherhood of Paper 
Makers (Local 34) the International 
Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and 
Paper Mill Workers (Local 73) and the 
International Association of Machinists 
Agreement to be in effect from May 1, 1946, 
to May 1, 1947, and thereafter from year to 
year subject to 30 day.' notice. The company 
recognizes the unions r s the agencies represent- 
ing their respective membership for the purpose 
of collective bargaining. Every employee shall 
as a condition of employment maintain mem- 
bership in good standing in one of the signatory 
unions. New employees being eligible for mem- 
bership in one of the unions shall join such 
union within a specified time. When hiring 
new employees, other things being equal, the 
company will give preference to union members. 
Hours of work— tour workers — 8 per shift, 
Monday through Saturday; day workers, 8£ 
Monday through Friday, 6| on Saturday, except 
that if the mill or part of the mill is not 
operating then 8| hours will constitute a regular 
day. Overtime — time and one-half for work in 
excess of the regular hours (except tour work) 
and on Sundays and 4 specified statutory 
holidays. 

Vacation — one week with pay after one year's 
service with the company, 2 weeks with pay 
after 5 years' service. 

Hourly wage rates for certain classes: 
Board mill — machine tenders $1.17, back tenders 
$1. third hands 90 cents, fourth hands 78 cents, 
fifth hands 74 cents, colour man 90 cents, 
beaterman 7H cents, others 65 to 73 cents; 
electrical — electricians 83 and 88 cents, helper 

70 cents, motor tender 71 cents; groundwood — 
grindermen 70 cents, deckerman, woodhandlers, 
wet machine operators 67 cents, others 65 to 67 
cents; mechanical — machinists, welders 87 and 
92 cents, helpers 70 and 71 cents, blacksmiths 
83 cents, millwrights 83 and 88 cents, pipe- 
fitters, carpenters 80 and 85 cents, helpers 70 
cents, painters 72 and 77 cents, oilers 71 cents; 



specialty paper finishing and shipping — males 
65 to 81 cents, females 49 to 68 cents; specialty 
paper mills — machine tenders $1.28 and $1.34, 
back tenders $1.11 and $1.18, third hands 97 
and 99 cents, fourth hands 79 cents, fifth hands 
76 >and 78 cents, engineer $1.17, panel board 
operator 78 cents, colour man 83 cents, size- 
man 76 cents, scaleman 75 cents, mixer man 

69 cents, spare hands 76 cents and $1, others 
65 to 72 cents; steam — firemen 70 to 77 cents, 
turbine operators 71 and 86 cents, others 65 to 

70 cents; sulphite — cooks 97 cents, acid makers 
83 cents, blow pits and digesters 74 cents, others 
65 to 69 cents; technical — testers 75 and 78 
cents; wood room 66 to 69 cents; woodyard — 
locomotive engineers 87 cents, brakemen, tractor 
operators 71 cents, sawyers 68 cents, oil men 65 
and 68 cents; garage — truck drivers 71 cents; 
general labourers, watchmen 65 cents. 

Provision is made for grievance procedure. 

Manufacturing: Printing and Publishing 

Toronto, Ont. — Toronto Daily Newspaper 
Publishers and the Paper Handlers' 
Auxiliary of the International Printing 
Pressmen's and Assistants' Union, Local 
No. 1 

Agreement to be in effect from June 1, 1946, 
to May 31, 1947, and thereafter from year to 
year subject to notice. Only union members 
to be employed, if available. Any non-union 
workers hired must join union. 

Hours of work: — 8 per day, 5 days, a 40-hour 
week for day work; 7|- per night, 5 nights, a 
37J-hour week for night work. Overtime: — 
time and one-half for work in excess of the 
above hours. All work on Sundays and holi- 
days (except three) for regular issues during 
the hours regularly worked throughout the week 
to be at straight time, all other work on these 
days at double time. Three holidays are paid 
holidays provided said day is not a regular 
day off. Vacation: — two weeks with pay for 
employees with at least one year's service; for 
those with less than one year, one day with pay 
for each 26 days worked up to a maximum of 2 
weeks. 

Weekly wage rates for journeymen paper- 
handlers $34.50 for both day and night shifts. 

Provision is made for an apprenticeship plan 
(apprentices to serve one year) and grievance 
procedure. 

Manufacturing: Non-Metallic Minerals and 
Chemicals 

Amherstburg, Ont. — Brunner, Mond Canada, 
Ltd. and the International Union 
United Automobile, Aircratt and Agri- 
cultural Implement Workers of America, 
Local 89. 
This agreement, originally made October 31, 
1942, and amended in 1943 and 1944 was again 
amended in settlement of a strike (L.G., Nov., 
p. 1652 and previous issues), and is now effec- 
tive from October 31, 1946, to October 31, 1947, 
and thereafter from year to year subject to 
notice. The company recognizes the union as 
the sole bargaining agent for all eligible 
employees. Check-off: The company will deduct 
regular union dues monthly from the pay of_ all 
union members and remit same to the union. 
There is an escape period of two weeks at the 
beginning of the term of this agreement and 
at the same time in each subsequent year 



46 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



during which any such employee may withdraw 
his name from the check-off list. There shall 
be no intimidation or coercion by the union or 
its members against non-union employees. 

Hours of work: 8 per day, 6 days a week, a 
48-hour week. A premium of 5 cents per hour 
is paid to employees on the afternoon and night 
shifts. Overtime: time and one-half for work 
in excess of the above hours and for all work 
on Sundays or regular day off and 6 specified 
statutory holidays. Vacation: one week with 
pay to employees with one year's continuous 
service with the company, 2 weeks with pay 
to those with 5 or more years' service. 

Provision is made for seniority rights and 
grievance procedure. 

Construction 

Canada— The Canadian Automatic Sprinkler 

Association and the United Association 

of Journeymen and Apprentices of the 

Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of 

the United States and Canada (the 

United Automatic Sprinkler Fitters, 

Apprentices and Helpers' Union, Local 

379). 

Agreement to be in effect from June 1, 1946, 

to July 1, il949, and thereafter from year to 

year until 6 months' notice is served. All 

sprinkler fitters and apprentices employed by 

the members of the association shall be union 

members. 

Hours of work: 8 per day Monday through 
Friday. Overtime: time and one-half for work 
in excess of the above hours and for all work 
on Saturdays. Double time for work on 
Sundays and 6 specified statutory holidays. 
Exception: "on all work where there is a legal 
provincial provision regarding the hours of 
work or other trades within the building 
industry are being employed in excess of the 
40-hour week, men can work Saturday mornings 
from 8 to 12 (a 44-hour week) at the rate of 
single time." Vacation: one week with pay for 
all sprinkler fitters, apprentices and helpers 
who have been employed by members of the 
association or any of their licensees, under the 
terms of the agreement for at least 1,600 hours. 
At the option of the employer one fitter may 
be sent to do small jobbing work without a 
helper. 

Hourly wage rates: $1.15 for all sprinkler 
fitters working in their home towns or within 
10 miles and from which they can return daily. 
Employer to pay extra car fares or transporta- 
tion charges over the regular city fares and a 
travelling allowance of 6 cents per mile for 
work outside city limits but within 10 mile 
radius, beyond 10 mile radius the employer 
may pay on this basis or as weekly board. 

Provision is made for the setting up of an 
apprenticeship plan and the settling of disputes. 

Windsor, Ont. — Plumbing and Heating Con- 
tractors Association and the United As- 
sociation of Plumbers and Steamfitters 
of the United States and Canada, Local 
552. 
Agreement to be in effect from February 26, 
1946, to March 1, 1947, and thereafter from year 
to year subject to 60 days' notice. The employ- 
ers agree that only journeymen and apprentice 
members of the union will be employed on work 
under the jurisdiction of this local. Any em- 
ployer requiring members of this local and not 
a party to the agreement shall be required to 
sign and accept the agreement and be governed 



by all of its provisions before any men will be 
supplied. 

Hours of work: 8 per day Monday through 
Friday, a 40-hour week. Overtime: double 
time for all work on Saturdays (except each 
shop will be allowed to employ one journeyman 
mechanic to perform emergency repairs on 
Saturday from 8 a.m. until 12 noon at single 
time), Sundays and 8 specific holidays. 

Hourly wage rate: journeymen $1.30, fore- 
men of 3 or more men shall receive 10 cents 
per hour above the regular rate, junior mech- 
anics' minimum rate shall be 80 per cent of the 
rate for journeymen, the minimum rate of wages 
for apprentices shall not be less than that 
stipulated by the Ontario Apprenticeship Act. 
Any union member reporting for work shall 
be entitled to 2 hours pay. One junior mechanic 
only to be allowed on any job to each branch 
of the trade except where there are more than 5 
journeymen plumbers or 5 journeymen steam- 
fitters employed and then one additional junior 
mechanic may be allowed to each additional 5 
journeymen plumbers or steamfitters. In the 
event that it becomes necessary to work shift 
work on any job, the same will be permitted 
and shall commence at the close of the regular 
working day, and shall be paid for at the rate 
of 8 hours time for 7 hours work, but no work- 
man will be allowed to work 2 continuous shifts 
in any calendar day, and shall only be allowed 
to work 40 hours in any week. 

Provision is made for grievance procedure. 

Vancouver, B.C. — The General Contractors 
Association of Vancouver and the In- 
ternational Hod Carriers, Building and 
Common Laboureres' Union, Local 602. 
Agreement to be in effect from September 23, 
1946, to September 22, 1947, and thereafter 
from year to year subject to 60 days' notice. 
Employers shall give preference to union men 
when they are available. 

Hours of work: 8 per day Monday through 
Friday, a 40-hour week, excepting when it is 
required to work on Saturday morning when it 
will be a 44-hour week. Overtime: all time 
worked after 8 hours until a break of 8 hours 
occurs shall be paid at the rate of time and one 
half for the first 4 hours and for work on Satur- 
day afternoons, double time for work in excess 
of the above and for all work on Sundays and 
8 specified holidays. No work shall be per- 
formed on Labour Day. In case of necessity 
shift work may be allowed, provided shifts 
continue for 3 consecutive nights and are run in 
addition to the regular day shift. Seven hours 
shall constitute a night shift for which 8 hours' 
pay must be allowed. Vacation: one week with 
pay as provided by Provincial law. 

Hourly wage rates as directed by the Re- 
gional War Labour Board: common labour 80 
cents, general building, concrete and cement 
labourers 86 cents, jackhammer and breaker- 
men $1, powdermen $1.15, rock foremen $1.25. 
Any labourer called to a job and not required 
shall be paid for 2 hours' time. 

Transportation: Water 

Vancouver, B.C. — Empire Stevedoring Com- 
pany Ltd., Canadian Stevedoring Com- 
pany Ltd., Louis Wolfe and Sons (Van- 
couver) Ltd., and International Long- 
shoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, 
Local 507, (Shipliners, Etc.). 

Agreement to be in effect from November 5. 
1946, to November 4, 1947, and thereafter from 



1947] 



COLLECTIVE AGREEMENTS AND WAGE SCHEDULES 



47 



year to year subject to 60 days' notice. The 
employers recognize the union as the exclusive 
representative for purposes of collective bar- 
gaining of all employees. Only union members 
are to be employed. All men shall be hired 
through the union local if they have suitable 
men available, if not, employer may secure men 
elsewhere but these shall be subject to union 
conditions. 

Hours of work and overtime: 8 per day Mon- 
day through Friday, 4 on Saturday, time and 
one-half for work between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. 
Monday through Friday and between noon and 
5 p.m. on Saturdays. Double time for work 
after 9 p.m. and all work on Sundays and 8 
specified statutory holidays and any day pro- 
claimed a holiday by Dominion statute. 

Hourly wage rates: chargehands $1.33, hatch- 
tenders, winchdrivers $1.28, all other labour 
$1.18 (these rates include 3 cents per hour for 
each hour worked as holiday allowance). 

Provision is made for pay and transportation 
when men are despatched to outside points, 
minimum working time (2 hours) and grievance 
procedure. 

Service: Business and Personal 

Vancouver, B.C. — Certain Restaurants and 
the Hotel and Restaurant Employees 
Union, Local 28. 
Agreement to be in effect from July 1, 1946. 
to June 30, 1947, and thereafter from year to 
year subject to 60 days' notice. This agreement 
is similar to the one previously in effect and 
summarized in the Labour Gazette, April 1944, 
p. 494 with the following changes: The employer 
agrees to recognize and bargain collectively, 
exclusively with the union. The provision for 
the check-off is not included. There shall be no 
discrimination against any employee for being 
a member of the union or for fulfilling the duties 
of an officer or committee member. Hours of 
work: 8 per day, 44 per week, overtime at 
time and one-half for work in excess of the 
above hours and for all work on any of 4 
specified holidays. Vacation: one week with pay 
for all employees with one year's continuous 
service, 2 weeks with pay for all employees 
with 2 or more years' continuous service. All 
employees working a full shift shall be allowed 
one 10-minute rest period each day aside from 
meal time. Wholesome meals shall be supplied 
by the employers with no deductions from the 
employees' wages on the following basis: 8 hours 
per day — 3 meals, 6 hours per day — 2 meals, 
4 hours per day — 1 meal. Minimum weekly wage 
rates: waitresses, counter (day work) $23.75 
for split shift, $21.75 for straight shift, (night 
— straight shift only) $24.75, tables (day work) 
$21.25 for split shift, $19.25 for straight shift, 
night $22.75; bus boys or girls $19.75 for split 
shift, $17.75 for straight shift, $20.75 for night; 
apprentices (first 6 months) $16.75 to $18.75; 



kitchen staff, dinner cooks and pastry cooks $37 
for split shift, $35 for straight shift, $40 for 
night, all other cooks and head pantry man $32 
for split shift, $30 for straight shift and $34 
for night, assistant pantrymen $27 for split 
shift, $25 for straight shift and $28.75 for night, 
vegetablemen, dishwashers and cooks' helpers 
$22 for split shift, $20 for straight shift and $23 
for night. 

Vancouver, B.C. — Certain Hotels and the 
Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union, 
Local 28. 

Agreement to be in effect from August 119, 
1946, to March 31, 1948, and thereafter from 
year to year subject to 60 days' notice. The 
employer agrees to recognize and bargain col- 
lectively, exclusively with the union. Mainten- 
ance of membership: all employees who are now 
or later become union members shall as a 
condition of employment remain members in 
good standing. There shall be no discrimination 
against any employee for being a member or 
officer of the union. 

Hours of work to be not greater than 8 per 
day or 44 in any one week, except in case of an 
emergency when overtime rates of time and one- 
half shall be paid and also for work on any of 4 
specified holidays. Vacation: One week with pay 
for ail employees with one year's continuous 
service, 2 weeks with pay for those with 2 or 
more years' continuous service. Any employee 
working 6 or more hours per day shall be al- 
lowed on his own time not less than one-half 
hour as a meal period between the fourth and 
fifth hours of work. Meals are supplied except 
to cashiers (front office), mail and information 
clerks. 

Minimum hourly wage rates: room clerks 68 
cents, (any clerk receiving a rate in excess of 
68 cents per hour, shall receive an increase of 
5 cents per hour, and the lowest rate above the 
minimum rate paid by the employer hereunder 
shall be the basic wage rate for room clerks 
who have completed 6 months service; and be- 
ginning clerks shall be increased up to such 
basic rate as their increasing experience and 
ability may warrant), switchboard operators 
521 cents, assistant and working housekeepers 
56 cents, linen rooms assistants and seamstresses 
51 cents, maids 47| cents; and the following 
are the rates for these classifications where 
employed — cashiers (front office) 62f cents, mail 
and information clerks 52£ cents, cooks 55 to 
90 cents, assistant cooks 50 to 75 cents, butcher 
81| cents, butcher's helper 68| cents, pastry 
chef 90 cents, first assistant pantryman 65 cents, 
helper 50 cents, iceman and day porters 50 cents, 
night porter 55 cents, vegetable cleaners 50 
cents, dish washers, male 47 cents, female 45 
cents, waiters 50 cents, waitresses 45 to 50 cents, 
bus boys (banquet floor) 45 cents, bus boys and 
bus girls (main floor) 4&1 cents. 

Provision is made for seniority rights and 
grievance procedure. 



Collective Agreement Act, Quebec 

Recent Proceedings Under the Act 



TN QUEBEC, the Collective Agreement Act 
■*■ provides that where a collective agreement 
has been entered into by an organization of 
employees and one or more employers or 
associations of employers, either side ma}' 
apply to the Provincial Minister of Labour to 



have the terms of the agreement which con- 
cern -wages, hours of labour, apprenticeship, 
and certain other conditions made binding 
throughout the province or within a certain 
district on all employers and employees in 
the trade or industry covered by the agree- 



48 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



ment. Notice of such application is published 
and 30 days are allowed for the filing of 
objections, after which an Order in Council 
may be passed granting the application, with 
or without changes as considered advisable 
by the Minister. The Order in Council may 
be amended or revoked in the same manner. 
Each agreement is administered and enforced 
by a joint committee of the parties. Further 
information concerning this legislation is given 
in the Labour Gazette, January, 1943, p. 86. 
Proceedings under this act and earlier legisla- 
tion have been noted in the Labour Gazette 
monthly since June, 1934. 

Recent proceedings under the act include 
the amendment of eighteen agreements, all 
of Which are noted below. Requests for the 
amendment of the agreements for building 
trades at St. Jerome and at Three Rivers, for 
both the work glove and the fine glove in- 
dustries for the province, as well as a request 
for a new agreement for the millinery in- 
dustry at Montreal, were all gazetted Novem- 
ber 23. Requests for amendments to the agree- 
ments covering the work glove and the fine 
glove industries for the province, for the 
cloak and suit industry for the province, for 
building trades and for hairdressers at Mont- 
real and for the furniture industry for the 
province were published November 30. A 
request for a new agreement for the ornamental 
iron and bronze industry at Montreal was 
also published November 30. Requests for the 
amendment of the agreements for clockmakers 
at Montreal and iron oxide miners at Red 
Mill were both gazetted December 7. Muni- 
cipal employees at Jonquiere requested a new 
agreement in the December 7 issue of the 
Quebec Official Gazette. A request for the 
amendment of the agreement covering the 
furniture industry for the province was pub- 
lished December 14. 

Orders in Council were also published ap- 
proving or amending the constitution and 
by-laws of certain joint committees and others 
approving the levy of assessment on the 
parties. 

Manufacturing: Fur and Leather Products 

Tannery Industry, Province of Quebec 

An Order in Council, dated November 14, 
and gazetted November 23, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (iL.G., Mar., 
1945, p. 349, April, p. 517; May, 1946, p. 627, 
June, p. 782, Aug., p. 1092, Sept., p. 1247, Oct., 
p. 1445) by the addition of "Les Cuirs Pathe 
Limitee" of Ste Marie-de-Beauee as co-contract- 
ing party. 

Manufacturing: Textiles and Clothing 

Cloak and Suit Industry, Province of 
Quebec 
An Order in Council, dated November 14, and 
gazetted November 23, amends the previous 



Orders in Council for this industry (L.G., July, 

1943, p. 989; May, 1944, p. 637; Aug., 1946, p. 
1093, Sept., p. 1249, Nov., p. 1583). Agree- 
ment to remain in effect to June 30, 1947, and 
thereafter from year to year, subject to notice. 

Overtime: all work after 5 p.m. is payable at 
time ond one-half. During the months of Jan- 
uary to April, inclusive, overtime may be worked 
which shall not exceed 8 hours in any one week 
or 2 hours in any one day on the first 4 days 
of the week and shall be paid at time and one- 
half. During the months of July to October, 
inclusive, overtime may be worked which does 
not exceed 4 hours in any one week or one hour 
on any one day on the first 4 days of the week. 

Increases in wages for week workers: skilled 
cutters to receive an increase of 10 per cent 
over their present rates; assistant cutters and 
trimmers, button sewers, general hands and 
special machine operators an increase of 12£ 
per cent; top pressers, machine pressers, under- 
pressers and pieee-pressers working on a weekly 
or hourly basis an increase of 10 per cent; fur 
tailors and assistant fur tailors being paid $40 
to $60 per week to receive a flat increase of $5 
per week, while fur tailors and assistant tailors 
who are paid $39.99 and less per week to re- 
ceive an increase of 12£ per cent. Increases 
for piece workers: operators to be paid an 
increase of 7£ per cent over the piece work 
rates paid on July 1, 1946; finishers, top pressers, 
machine pressers, under pressers and piece 
pressers, lining makers and skirtmakers an in- 
crease of 6 per cent; fur tailors and assistant 
fur tailors working on a piece-work basis an 
increase of 12£ per cent. These increases are to 
be retroactive to July 1, 1946. 

Minimum wage rates for employees working 
on an hourly or weekly basis only: full skilled 
cutters $il per hour, semi-skilled cutters 76 
cents, trimmers 77 cents, fur tailors 83 cents, 
assistant fur tailors 62 cents, button sewers, 
general hands, examiners 44 cents. Minimum 
wage rates for piece work (piece rates to be 
fixed to yield at least the following rates for 
workers in the following classes) : skilled oper- 
ators (male) $1 per hour, (female) 82 cents, 
section operators (male or female), top pressers. 
machine pressers $1, under pressers 95 cents, 
piece pressers, semi-skilled operators (male) 76 
cents, semi-skilled operators (female) 71 cents, 
skirt makers, lining makers, finishers, machine 
basters, hand basters, special machine operators 
62 cents. 

Appreatices are limited to 5 per cent of the 
number of workers employed in an establish- 
ment. 

Wages for apprentices: apprentice operators, 
pressers, fur tailors from $12 per week during 
first 6 months to $30 ($27 for female apprentice 
operators) after 3 years; apprentice skirt mak- 
ers, lining makers, finishers, machine basters. 
hand basters and special machine operators 
from $12 during first 6 months to $22.80 after 
2 years; apprentice cutters and trimmers from 
$12 during first 6 months to $40 after 4 years: 
apprentice button-sewers, general hands and 
examiners from $12 during first 6 months to 
$17.60 after 18 months. 

Holidays: employees who have worked in the 
industry for one year and for the same em- 
ployer for at least 3 months are entitled to 3 
specified legal holidays with pay. 

Embroidery Industry, Montreal 

An Order in Council, dated November 14. and 
gazetted November 23, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G. Dec, 

1944, p. 1514; Sept., 1946, p. 1249, Nov., p. 1584). 



1947] 



COLLECTIVE AGREEMENTS AND WAGE SCHEDULES 



49 



The names of the contracting parties are re- 
placed by "Fashion Accessories Manufacturers 
Association Inc." on the one part and "Em- 
broidery Pleaters, Stitchers and Button Mak- 
ers Union, Local 315, of the International 
Ladies Garment Workers Union" on the other 
part. Present agreement to remain in effect 
until July 31, 1947, and thereafter from year 
to year, subject to notice. Needlework orna- 
mentation by hand or machine, Bonnaz em- 
broidering, nailhead and rhinestone setting are 
added to the list of operations. 

Hours: 40-hour week. No work shall be per- 
formed on Saturday. No overtime is permitted 
on Friday. 

Minimum hourly wage rates: Bonnaz operators 
97 cents, pleaters and pattern makers 58 cents, 
crochet beaders 39 cents, stampers, special mach- 
ine operators 42 cents, hand embroidery work- 
ers, floor help, . pleaters assistant, covered 
button and buckle makers 33 cents, apprentice 
floor helpers from 21 cents per hour during 
first 6 months to 33 cents after 18 months, 
apprentice machine operators or apprentice 
stampers from 21 cents during first 6 months to 
42 cents <after 30 months, apprentice Bonnaz 
operators from 21 cents during first 6 months 
to 70 cents after 42 months. 

Manufacturing: Pulp, Paper and Paper 
Products 

Uncorrugated Paper Box Industry, Province 
of Quebec 

An Order in Council, dated December 5, and 
gazetted December 14, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G., Aug. 
1945, p. 1197, Oct., p. 1520; Mar. 1946, p. 317, 
Aug., p. 1093, Sept., p. 1249, Oct., p. 1445). 

The original agreement provides for minimum 
wage rates for each classification of worker and 
also for an average minimum. This amendment 
sets forth the procedure for distributing the 
difference between the wages paid in a plant in 
any period and the amount required to make up 
the minimum average. The parity committee is 
to collect such amount from the employer and 
distribute it among the employees concerned. 
Manufacturing: Miscellaneous Wood Products 
Furniture Industry, Province of Quebec 

An Order in Council dated November 21, and 
gazetted November 30, amends the previous 
Order in Council for this industry (L.G., 



April, 1946, p. 499). If it is agreed that no 
work be performed on Saturdays, the normal 
working day must not exceed 10 hours per day 
which will be remunerated at the regular rates. 

Manufacturing: Metal Products 

Ornamental Iron and Bronze Industry, 
Montreal 
An Order in Council, dated November 28, and 
gazetted December 7, extends the term of the 
previous Orders in Council for this industry 
(L.G., Oct. 1945, p. 1520; Oct. 1946, p. 1445, 
Nov., p. 1585) to February 1, 1947. 

Sheet Metal Manufacturing Industry, 
Montreal 
An Order in Council, dated December 5, and 
gazetted December ,14, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G., Sept. 
1944, p. 11141; Sept. 1945, p. 1341; Dec. 1916, 
p. 1772). This amendment does not affect the 
summary already given. 

Construction 

Building Trades, Quebec 

An Order in Council, dated November 14, and 
gazetted November 23, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G., Aug. 
1944, p. 1007; Mar. 1946, p. 317, Aug., p. 1094, 
Oct., p. 1445, and previous issues). The new 
wage rates are shown in the accompanying table. 

For structural steel, tank and other plate 
work and the installation of portable boilers and 
tanks, the minimum rate is $1.11, except the 
installation of portable tanks and boilers under 
2 tons in weight, for which the rate is 78 
cents. Workers installing stokers in furnaces 
with a horizontal heating surface of 20 feet or 
less shall be paid 89 cents per hour and their 
helpers 67 cents. Painters (structural iron) are 
to be paid $1 per hour; structural iron erectors 
and welders, boiler-makers, steam generator 
erectors and mechanics and welders $1.11, help- 
ers 84 cents. Wage rate for apprentices of the 
second year is 85 per cent of the rate paid to 
skilled workers. For maintenance men in Zone 
I, qualified workmen shall receive $32 per week 
and unqualified workmen (labourers) $25; out- 
side Zone I, qualified workmen $27 per week, 
unqualified workmen $23. 

Apprentices: one apprentice to 5 structural 
iron workers. 



Minimum Hourly Wage Rates for the Building Trades, Quebec City and District 



Trades 

Bricklayer, plasterer, mason 

Carpenter-joiner 

Caulker 

Painter: 

Journeyman 

Junior journeyman (one year) 

Labourer 

Mortar maker 

Celanite mixer 

Plaster pourer 

Hod carrier 

Joint pointer 

Cement finisher 

Tile, marble and terrazzo layer 

Terrazzo polishing machine operator, 1st six 

months (apprenticeship) 

Terrazzo polishing machine operator 





Hourly rates 






Zones 






I 


II 


III 


IV 


$1.10 


$0.95 


$0.85 


$0 . 80 


0.90 


0.85 


0.75 


0.70 


0.70 


0.60 


0.55 


0.50 


0.81 


0.76 


0.66 


0.61 


0.71 


0.66 






0.65 


0.60 


0.50 


0.50 


0.65 


0.60 


0.50 


0.50 


0.65 


0.60 


0.50 


0.50 


0.65 


0.60 


0.50 


0.50 


0.65 


0.60 


0.50 


0.50 


0.80 


0.70 


0.65 


0.60 


0.80 


0.70 


0.65 


0.60 


0.80 


0.70 


0.65 


0.60 


0.60 


0.55 


0.45 


0.45 


0.70 


0.65 


0.60 


0.55 



50 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



JANUARY 



Minimum Hourly Wage Rates for the Building Trades, Quebec City and District— Gone. 



Trades 

Driller t 

Pneumatic hammer operator 

Lather (metal) 

Lather (wood) 

Engineman-mechanical shovels 

Engineman-tractors 

Engineman-hoisting 

Engineman-mixers 

Engineman-compressors 

Engineman-stationary and portable machines. . 

Pipe mechanic (plumber, pipe fitter and refri- 
geration mechanic) : 

Contractor (personal services) 

Journeyman 

Junior journeyman (one year) 

Electrician: 

Contractor (personal services) 

Journeyman 

Tinsmith-roofer : 

Journeyman 

Junior journeyman (one year) 

Ornamental iron and bronze mechanic: 

Journeyman 

Blacksmith 

Fitter 

Floor scraper, polisher and sander, by hand or 
with machine 

Job watchman (night or day), a maximum of 
72 hours per week 

Buildino Trades, St. John's and Iberville 

An Order in Council, dated (November 14, and 
gazetted November 23, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G., Feb., 
1943, p. 220; July, 1944, p. 867; Mar. 1946, p. 
349. May, p. 721, and previous issues). 

Minimum hourly wage rates: bricklayers, 
plasterers, masons, including cutters on the field, 
marble setters 88 cents; carpenters-joiners, 
erectors of screens (wood or metal), sashes, 
windows, steel partitions, joiners, concrete forms 
(shop or job), wood floor makers, weather- 
strippers, lathers (wood or metal) 80 cents; 
electricians, sheet metal workers, tile setters, 
journeymen plumbers, steamfitters and pipe 
mechanics, men doing installation of, or main- 
tenance work on oil burners, gasoline pumps 
83 cents; enginemen (hoist), enginemen (steam 
mixer), terrazzo layers, junior journeymen 
plumbers, steamfitters and pipe mechanics 73 
cents; journeymen roofers (asbestos, slate, tile 
and composition) 80 cents, helpers 58 cents; 
compressor operators 68 cents; enginemen 
(gasoline mixer) hod carriers, common workers, 
cement finishers 58 cents; painters, sprayers, 
decorators, glaziers, paper hangers, floor var- 
nishers 76 cents; terrazzo polishers — dry polish- 
ing 68 cents, water polishing 63 cents; 
apprentices for plumbing, heating, pipefitting, 
sheet-metal, carpenter's-joiner's and electrician's 
trades from 45 cents during first year to 65 
cents in fourth year; apprentices for painter's, 
sprayer's, glazier's, decorator's and paper 
hanger's trades from 40 cents in first year to 
60 cents in fourth year; apprentices' rates for 
bricklayer's, mason's and plasterer's trades shall 
be determined according to a percentage of 
minimum rates of skilled workers, from 45 to 
75 per cent after 4 years; painters (structural 
iron) $1; boilermakers, erectors and steam 
generator mechanics, structural iron erectors 
and welders $1.11; helpers 84 cents; structural 



I 

0.75 
0.70 
0.75 
0.75 
0.80 
0.80 
0.80 
0.81 
0.81 
0.75 



1.30 
0.90 
0.75 

1.30 
0.90 

0.90 
0.80 

0.85 
0.85 
0.75 

0.80 

0.40 



Hourly rates 


i 


Zones 




II 


III 


0.70 


0.60 


0.65 


0.60 


0.70 


0.60 


0.70 


0.60 


0.70 


0.60 


0.70 


0.60 


0.70 


0.60 


0.71 


0.66 


0.71 


0.66 


0.70 


0.60 


1.10 


1.05 


0.80 


0.75 


0.65 




1.10 


1.05 


0.80 


0.75 


0.80 


0.75 


0.70 




0.80 


0.75 


0.80 


0.75 


0.70 


0.65 



0.75 



0.40 



0.70 



0.40 



IV 
0.55 
0.55 
0.55 
0.55 
0.55 
0.55 
0.55 
0.61 
0.61 
0.55 



1.00 
0.70 



1.00 
0.70 

0.70 



0.70 
0.70 
0.60 

0.65 

0.40 



steel workers and men installing portable 
boilers and tanks $1.11; men installing portable 
tanks under 2 tons 78 cents; workers installing 
stokers in furnaces with a horizontal heating 
surface of 20 feet or less 89 cents, helpers 
67 cents. 

Building Trades, St. Jerome 

An Order in Council, dated November 14, and 
gazetted November 23, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G., Feb. 
1943, p. 220, April, p. 490; Feb., 1945, p. 182, 
Oct., p. 1520; Nov. 1946, p. 1585 and previous 
issues). This amendment does not affect the 
summary already given. 

Trade 

Hardware and Paint Trade, Quebec 

An Order in Council, dated November 14, and 
gazetted November 23, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G., Oct., 
1943, p. 1381; June, 1944, p. 754; Oct., 1945, p. 
1520; July, 1946, p. 931, and previous issues). 
Hours of work: from June 15 to September 15 
of each year, the regular work week ends at 
1 p.m. on Saturday; all work performed after 
this time is to be remunerated at time and one- 
half the wages paid. The number of specified 
paid holidays is increased by the addition of 
July 1 (Canada Day). 

When a vacancy occurs in the first half of 
each category, the employee with at least 9 
years' experience, classified in the eighth year 
as to the wages and waiting for a vacancy in the 
first half, shall automatically be promoted to 
the ninth year in respect of the wages, according 
to seniority. Extra clerks are to be paid 60 
cents per hour, supernumerary clerks 40 cents, 
female employees 25 cents. An employee classi- 
fied as clerk and doing delivery work for not 
more than 50 per cent of the regular weekly 
working hours shall be paid the minimum wage 



1947] 



COLLECTIVE AGREEMENTS AND WAGE SCHEDULES 



51 



of $23.60 per week when his years of experi- 
ence as clerk do pot entail the payment of a 
higher wage rate, in which case he shall be paid 
such higher rate based on his years of service. 

Retail Stores, St. Hyacinthe 

An Order in Council, dated November 14, and 
gazetted November 23, amends the previous 
Order in Council for this industry (L.G., Dec, 
1945, p. 1827). This amendment does not affect 
the summary already given. 

Service: Professional Establishments 

Hospital and Charitable Institution 
Employees, Quebec District 

An Order in Council, dated December 5, and 
gazetted December 14, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G. Nov., 
1944, p. 1369; Sept., 1946, p. 1254). "Le 
Syndicat national des Services hospitaliers de 
Roberval" is added as co-contracting party. 
Present agreement to remain in effect to 
December 1, 1947, and therafter from year to 
year, subject to notice. 

Minimum weekly wage rates: graduate nurses 
in the 3 zones $25 for first 6 months, $27 for 
second 6 months and $28 after one year; regular 
male employees — chief stationary enginemen $37 
to $54 in zones I and II, $35 to $54 in zone III; 
enginemen 53 cents to 68 cents per hour in zones 

I and II, 50 to 65 cents in zone III; skilled 
workers 73 cents in all zones; firemen 45 cents 
in zones I and II, 42 cents in zone III; cooks, 
butchers, launderers, shoemakers, bakers from 
$25 per week during first 6 months to $32 after 
one year in zone I, from $23 to $31 in zone II 
and from $21 to $30 in zone III; motor-vehicle 
drivers from $22 during first 6 months to $32 
after 4 years in zone I, from $20 to $31 in zone 

II and from $18 to $30 in zone III; orderlies or 
patient attendants from $20 during first 6 
months to $32 in zone I, to $31 in zone II and 
to $30 in zone III after 5 years; construction 
tradesmen in districts in which there is no 
building trades agreement in force — skilled 
workers $32 in zones I and II and $28 in zone 
III, labourers $24 in zones I and II and $22 in 
zone III; building watchmen and other male 
employees from $18 during the first 6 months to 
$30 after 5 years in zone I, from $17 to $29 in 
zone II and from $15 to $27 in zone III; regular 
female employees-^departmental superintendents 
from $14 during first 6 months tto $19 after 

3 years in all zones; seamstresses from $14 
during first 6 months to $17 after 3 years in 
all zones; office employees, teachers, skilled 
employees, cooks from $12 during first 6 months 
to $16 after 3 years in zone I, from $11 to $15 
in zone II and from $10 to $14 in zone III; 
junior employees $8 in all zones; other female 
employees from $11 during first 6 months to $14 
after 3 years in zone I, from $10 to $13 in zone 
II and from $9 to $12 in zone III. Overtime 
rates for stationary enginemen are from 794 
cents to $1.02 per hour in zones I and II and 
from 75 cents to 974 cents in zone III, for fire- 
men 674 cents in zones I and II, 63 cents in 
zone III. Overtime for other employees is 
payable either at time and one-half or by a paid 
holiday equivalent to one and a half times 
employees' hours of overtime to be given in the 

4 weeks following that during which overtime 
was worked. 



Hospital and Charitable Institution 
Employees, Sherbrooke 
An Order in Council, dated November 14, and 
gazetted November 23, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G., Nov., 
1944, p. 1369; July, 1946, p. 931). This amend- 
ment does not affect the summary already given. 

Service: Business and Personal 

Barbers and Hairdressers, Quebec 

An Order in Council, dated December 5, and 
gazetted December 14, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G-., Oct., 

1944, p. 1247; Mar., 1945, p. 351, Aug., p. 1199; 
June, 1946, p. 784). The municipality of Ste. 
Monique des Saules is now included in zone I. 
Hours for barbers are reduced to 54 per week 
in zone I and 58 in zone II. For hairdressers, 
all work in excess of 48 hours per week is 
considered as overtime and is payable at regular 
rates; however, the weekly duration of labour 
must not exceed 524 hours. Vacation is to be 
taken any time during the period between May 1 
and October 1. An employee who has not taken 
his vacation may claim a sum equivalent to his 
wages for the period of vacation to which he is 
entitled. The day after New Year's, when the 
latter is not a Friday or a Monday, is now 
included in the list of days to be kept as holi- 
days in all barber shops, hairdressing or beauty 
parlors. 

This amendment also provides for certain 
changes in apprentice regulations. 

Barbers and Hairdressers, St. Hyacinthe 

An Order in Council, dated November 14, and 
gazetted November 23, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G., Jan., 

1945, p. 71; Jan., 1946, p. 52, June, p. 784, Oct., 
p. 1447, and previous issues) . The hours of 
work for ladies' male and female hairdressers 
in zone I are reduced to 51 hours per week 
during the months of May, June and December 
and 49 hours per week during the rest of the 
year. 

Barbers and Hairdressers, Hull 

An Order in Council, dated November 21, and 
gazetted November 30, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G., Oct 

1941, p. 1316, Dec, p. 1573; Sept., 1942, p. 1098 
Mar., 1943, p. 341; Oct., p. 1382, Nov., p. 1530 
Sept., 1946, p. 1255). Minimum wage rates 
Barbers in zone I shall be paid $20 per week 
plus 60 per cent of their proceeds in excess of 
$30, in zone II $16 per week plus 60 per cent of 
their proceeds in excess of $25. Vacation: in 
zone I, barbers are to be given one week's 
vacation with pay at $20. 

Barbers and Hairdressers, Rouyn and 

NORANDA 

An Order in Council, dated November 28, and 
gazetted December 7, amends the previous 
Orders in Council for this industry (L.G., April, 

1942, p. 484, July, p. 857; June, 1944, p. 754, 
Sept., p. 1143; Nov., 1946, p. 1586) by providing 
for certain changes in apprentice regulations. 



Fair Wage Conditions in Dominion Government Contracts 



THE Fair Wages Policy of the Dominion 
Government has the purpose of ensuring 
that all government contracts contain provi- 
sions to secure the payment of wages generally 
accepted as current in each trade for com- 
petent workmen in the district where the work 
is carried out. 

There are two sets of conditions applicable 
to government contracts, those which apply 
to building and construction work, and those 
which apply to contracts for the manufacture 
of various classes of government supplies and 
equipment. 

The practice of the different departments 
of the Government, before entering into 
contracts in the first group, is to obtain from 
the Department of Labour schedules setting 
forth the current wage rates for the different 



classes of workmen required in the execution 
of the work. These schedules, known as fair 
wages schedules, are thereupon included by 
the department concerned in the terms of the 
contract. 

Fair wages schedules are not issued in respect 
of contracts for supplies and equipment. Con- 
tracts in this group are covered by the general 
provision that rates must equal those current 
in the district, and in addition, by the require- 
ment that the rates must not be less than 35 
cents an hour for male workers 18 years of 
age and over, 25 cents for female workers 18 
years of age and over, and 20 cents for be- 
ginners and for workers under 18. 

A more detailed account of the Dominion 
Government's Fair Wages Policy is given in 
the Labour Gazette for July, 1946, p. 932. 



Schedules Prepared and Contracts Awarded During November 

During the month of November the Depart- pany, Limited, Victoria, B.C. Date of con- 

ment of Labour prepared, on request, 30 fair tract, October 16, 1946. Amount of contract, 

wages schedules for inclusion in building and approximately $11,792. A fair wages schedule 

construction contracts proposed to be under- was included in the contract as follows: — 

taken by various departments of the Govern- • Per Hour 

ment of Canada in different parts of the Asphalt rakers $ .81 

Dominion. Asphalt tampers, smoothers and spreaders 71 

Particulars of the contracts which have been Truck drivers: 

entered into during this period by the various V n ? eT 5 ^ 25 

~, , , " . i i 5 tons and over 75 

Government departments appear hereunder:— Labourers (common) 65 

W Works of Construction, Remodelling £3 ^aS^A^"^"::::": '5 

Repair or Demolition 

Note. — The labour conditions of each of the 

contracts noted under this heading, besides _ _ . _ _ ' __ 
stipulating working hours of not more than 8 Reconstruction of pier, Bronte, Ont. Name 
per day and 44 per week, provide that "where, of contractor, C. S. Boone Dredging and Con- 
by provincial legislation, or by agreement or section Company, Limited, Toronto, Ont 
current practice, the working hours of any Date of contract, October 30, 1946. Amount of 
class of workers are less than 44 per week, contract approximately $124,023.50. A fair 
such lesser hours shall not be exceeded on this wa ^ es schedule was included in the contract 
work except in cases of emergency as may be as *°" ows: 
approved by the Minister of Labour and then er our 

only subject to the payment of overtime rate., SEt^t^..:::::::::::::::::::::::::: ":» 

as specified by the Minister of Labour", and Cement and concrete mixer operators (gas.) 70 

also specify that the rates of wages set Out Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 65 

therein are "minimum rates only" and that Dive ™ <J° ^jf 1 ™ ^art^timef S ^ whether u 48 . 

"nothing herein contained shall be considered Div £J. p tenders" (T? be "allowed' f uli ' day ; s'pay 

as exempting contractors from the payment of whether employed full or part time) 5.48* 

higher rates in any instance where such higher Dri11 runners 65 

rates are fixed by provincial legislation". 5H2T < 52£T:. — ^'^^ % 

Labourers 56 

Department of Public Works Motor truck drivers 60 

Motor truck driver and truck 1 .60 

Maintenance repairs to roadways and yard, ^ int f s (brusl , l) ,••■.•;••; «*5J 

Esquimalt Dry Dock, Esquimalt Harbour, B.C. PUe dn ver and dem< * foremen 1M 

Name of contractors, Victoria Paving Com- *Perday. 

52 



FAIR WAGE CONDITIONS 



53 



Per Hour 

Pile driver and derrick engineers 95 

Pile driver and derrick firemen . 70 

Pile driver and derrick men (rigging, setting and 

signalling) 70 

Pile driver and derrick labourers 60 

Steam shovel engineers 1.08 

Steam shovel firemen 70 

Steam shovel oilers . .. .60 

Timbermen and cribmen (measuring, scribing 
and, by the use of the axe, adze, etc., 

cutting and fitting timber) 65 

Watchmen 51 



Reconstruction of wharf, Sault Ste. Marie, 
Ont. Name of contractors, Messrs. L. R. 
Brown and Company, Limited, Sault Ste. 
Marie, Ont. Date contract awarded, November 
7, 1946. Amount of contract, $38,362.52. A 
fair wages schedule was included in the con- 
tract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Blacksmiths $ .75 

Blacksmiths' helpers 56 

Carpenters and joiners 1.00 

Cement finishers 70 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 75 

Gas. or elec 65 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 66 

Divers (To be allowed full day's pay whether 

employed full or part time) 14.48* 

Divers' tenders (To be allowed full day's pay 

whether employed full or part time) 5.48* 

Labourers 56 

Motor truck drivers 56 

Motor truck driver and truck 1.55 

Timbermen and cribmen (measuring, scribing 

and, by the use of the axe, adze, etc., 

cutting and fitting timber) 61 

Watchmen 46 



Wharf improvements, Ucluelet West, B.C. 
Name of contractors, Messrs. Dunlop and 
McDonald, Vancouver, B.C. Date contract 
awarded, November 15, 1946. Amount of con- 
tract, $9,972.80. A fair wages schedule was 
included in the contract as follows : — 

Per Hour 

Cement finishers $ 1 .02 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 1.02 

Gas. or elec 81 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 81 

Labourers 65 

Pile driver and derrick foremen 1 .37 

Pile driver and derrick engineers 1 .24 

Pile driver and derrick bridgemen 1.12 

Pile driver and derrick boommen 1 . 12 

Pile driver and derrick men (rigging, setting and 

signalling) 1.12 

Pile driver and derrick firemen 80 

Watchmen 60 

Wharf and dock builders 1.12 



Alterations to the roof of Government 
House, Ottawa, Ont. Name of contractor, Mr. 
H. Dagenais, Ottawa, Ont. Date contract 
awarded, November 8, 1946. Amount of con- 



tract, $5,900. A fair wages schedule was in- 
cluded in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Brick and hollow tile layers $ 1 .25 

Brick and hollow tile layers' helpers (mixing 

and tempering mortar) 05 

Carpenters and joiners 1.05 

Cement finishers 75 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 80 

Gas. or elec 70 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 70 

Labourers 61 

Lathers : 

Metal 1.00 

Wood 90 

Motor truck drivers 65 

Motor truck driver and truck 1 .65 

Painters and glaziers 86 

Plasterers 1.16 

Plasterers' helpers (mixing and tempering ma- 
terial) 65 

Plumbers and steamfitters 1.12 

Riggers (general) 75 

Roofers : 

Felt and gravel: patent: composition 65 

Sheet metal 1.10 

Sheet metal workers 1 .10 

Structural steel workers 1-00 

Watchmen 56 



*Per day. 



Construction of a Customs-Immigration 
Building and site development, Edmundston, 
N.B. Name of contractors, Messrs. John Flood 
and Sons, Saint John, N.B. Date contract 
awarded, November 15, 1946. Amount of con- 
tract, $64,321. A fair wages schedule was in- 
cluded in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Asbestos insulation workers $ .70 

Brick and hollow tile layers 90 

Brick and hollow tile layers' helpers (mixing 

and tempering mortar) ... .55 

Carpenters and j oiners 70 

Cement finishers 75 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 75 

Gas. or elec 60 

Drivers 50 

Driver, team and wagon 80 

Electricians (inside wiremen) 75 

Engineers, operating, steam 75 

Engineers on steel erection 90 

Hoist operators — tower (gas. or elec.) 60 

Labourers 50 

Lathers : 

Metal 70 

Wood 65 

Motor truck drivers 55 

Motor truck driver and truck 1.55 

Ornamental iron workers 70 

Painters and glaziers 70 

Plasterers 90 

Plasterers' helpers (mixing and tempering ma- 
terial) 55 

Plumbers and steamfitters 75 

Roofers : 

Felt and gravel: patent: composition 55 

Sheet metal 75 

Sheet metal workers 75 

Steam shovel engineers 1 .06 

Steam shovel firemen 65 

Steam shovel oilers 60 

Shovel operators (gas.) 1.06 



54 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



Per Hour 

Stonecutters 75 

Stonemasons 90 

Stonemasons' helpers (mixing and tempering 

mortar) 55 

Structural steel workers 90 

Tile setters (asphalt) 70 

Tile setters' helpers (all men assigned to help 

tradesmen) 55 

Watchmen 45 

Waxers and polishers (floor) 55 

Welders and burners: 

Acetylene or elec 70 

On steel erection 90 



Construction of a causeway, Three Fathom 
Harbour, N.S. Name of contractors, Messrs. 
Walker and Hall, Halifax, N.S. Date contract 
awarded, November 15, 1946. Amount of con- 
tract, $48,839. A fair wages schedule was in- 
cluded in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Blacksmiths $ .85 

Blacksmiths' helpers 65 

Boatmen (rowboats) 60 

Divers (To be allowed full day's pay whether 

employed full or part time) 14 .48* 

Divers' tenders (To be allowed full day's pay 

whether employed full or part time) 5.48* 

Drivers 60 

Driver, team and wagon 95 

Engineers, operating, steam 90 

Engineers, crane (steam, gas., elec.) 90 

Firemen, stationary 70 

Hoist operators — tower (gas. or elec.) 70 

Labourers 60 

Motor boat operators 65 

Motor truck drivers 65 

Motor truck driver and truck 1 .65 

Pile driver and derrick foremen 1 .00 

Pile driver and derrick engineers 90 

Pile driver and derrick men (rigging, setting 

and signalling) 75 

Pile driver and derrick firemen 70 

Pile driver and derrick labourers 65 

Timbermen and cribmen (measuring, scribing 

and, by the use of the axe. adze, etc., 

cutting and fitting timber) 70 

Watchmen 55 



Repairs and improvements to float and ap- 
proach at Bamfield West, and wharf repairs 
and float renewal at Bamfield East, B.C. Name 
of contractors, Messrs. Dunlop and McDonald, 
Vancouver, B.C. Date contract awarded, 
November 18, 1946. Amount of contract, 
$19,841.86. A fair wages schedule was included 
in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Pile driver and derrick foremen $1 . 37 

Pile driver and derrick engineers 1 . 24 

Pile driver and derrick bridgemen 1.12 

Pile driver and derrick men (rigging, setting and 

signalling) 1.12 

Pile driver and derrick boommen -1.12 

Pile driver and derrick firemen 80 

Wharf and dock builders 1.12 

Labourers 65 

Watchmen 60 



Alterations and additions to public building, 
Leamington, Ont. Name of contractors, 
Messrs. George E. Clark and Son, Dresden, 
Ont. Date contract awarded, November 20, 
1946. Amount of contract, $30,000. A fair 
wages schedule was included in the contract 
as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Brick and hollow tile layers $1 .36 

Brick and hollow tile layers' helpers (mixing 

and tempering mortar) 71 

Carpenters and joiners 1 .23 

Cement finishers 80 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 90 

Gas. or elec 75 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 75 

Drivers 71 

Driver, team and wagon 1.05 

Electricians (inside wiremen) 1 . 30 

Labourers 71 

Lathers : 

Metal 1.00 

Wood -1.00 

Linoleum layers 75 

Motor truck drivers , 71 

Motor truck driver and truck 1.70 

Ornamental iron workers 85 

Painters and glaziers 1.00 

Plasterers 1 . 25 

Plasterers' helpers (mixing and tempering ma- 
terial) 75 

Plumbers and steamfitters 1.30 

Roofers : 

Felt and gravel: patent: composition 76 

Sheet metal 1.06 

Sheet metal workers 1 . 06 

Stonecutters 1 .06 

Stonemasons 1 . 36 

Stonemasons' helpers (mixing and tempering 

mortar) 71 

Structural steel workers 1 .05 

Tile setters (asphalt) 80 

Tile setters' helpers (all men assigned to help 

tradesmen) 71 

Watchmen 57 

Waxers and polishers (floor) 71 



Construction of a wharf, Louisburg, N.S. 
Name of contractors, Messrs. T. C. Gorman 
(Nova Scotia), Limited, Halifax, N.S. Date 
contract awarded, November 23, 1946. Amount 
of contract, $226,090. A fair wages schedule 
was included in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Blacksmiths $ .85 

Blacksmiths helpers 64$ 

Boatmen (rowboats) 59* 

Carpenters and joiners 96 

Cement finishers 80 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 80 

Gas. or elec 70 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 70 

Divers (To be allowed full day's pay whether 

employed full or part time) 14.48* 

Divers' tenders (To be allowed full day's pay 

whether employed full or part time) 5.48* 

Drivers 59.} 

Driver, horse and cart 75 

Driver, team and wagon 95 



'Per day. 



f Per day. 



1947] 



FAIR WAGE CONDITIONS 



55 



Per Hour 

Drill runners 70 

Engineers, operating, steam 85 

Engineers, crane (steam, gas., elec.) 85 

Enginemen, stationary 78 

Hoist operators tower (gas. or elec.) 70 

Labourers 59% 

Motor boat operators 65 

Motor truck drivers 65 

Motor truck driver and truck 1 . 65 

Pipefitters (surface — temp, work) 70 

Powdermen 70 

Pumpmen 70 

Riggers (general) 70 

Rodmen (reinforced steel) .70 

Steam shovel engineers 1.10 

Steam shovel firemen 70 

Steam shovel oilers 65 

Shovel operators (gas.) 1.10 

Timbermen and cribmen (measuring, scribing 
and, by the use of the axe, adze, etc., 

cutting and fitting timber) 70 

Watchmen 54£ 

Welders and burners (acetylene or elec.) 80 



Construction of a revetment wall, Meaford, 
Ont. Name of , contractors, Canadian Dredge 
and Dock Company, Limited, Toronto, Ont. 
Date contract awarded, November 25, 194(3. 
Amount of contract, $43,225.04. A fair wages 
schedule was included in the contract as 
follows : — 

Per Hour 

Boatmen (rowboats) | .51 

Blacksmiths 70 

Blacksmiths' helpers 5.5 

Carpenters and joiners 90 

Cement finishers 70 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 75 

Gas. or elec 65 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 65 

Divers (To be allowed full day's pay whether 

employed full or part time) 14.48* 

Divers' tenders (To be allowed full day's pay 

whether employed full or part time) 5.48* 

Drivers 51 

Driver, team and wagon 85 

Engineers, operating, steam 81 

Engineers, crane (steam, gas., elec.) 85 

Enginemen, stationary 60 

Hoist operators — tower (gas. or elec.) 60 

Labourers 51 

Motor truck drivers 55 

Motor truck driver and truck 1.55 

Pile driver and derrick foremen 1.00 

Pile driver and derrick engineers 90 

Pile driver and derrick firemen 60 

Pile driver and derrick men (rigging, setting and 

signalling) 65 

Pile driver and derrick labourers 55 

Timbermen and cribmen (measuring, scribing 

and, by the use of the axe, adze, etc., cutting 

and fitting timber) 56 

Watchmen 46 

Welders and burners (acetylene or elec.) 80 



awarded, November 26, 1946. Amount of con- 
tract, $9,000. A fair wages schedule was in- 
cluded in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Brick and hollow tile layers $1.25 

Brick and hollow tile layers' helpers (mixing 

and tempering mortar) 65 

Carpenters and joiners 1.05 

Cement finishers 75 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 80 

Gas. or elec 70 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 70 

Drivers 60 

Driver, team and wagon 95 

Electricians (inside wiremen) 1.05 

Labourers 60 

Lathers : 

Metal 90 

Wood 80 

Motor truck drivers 65 

Motor truck driver and truck 1 .65 

Painters and glaziers 86 

Plasterers 1.15 

Plasterers' helpers (mixing and tempering ma- 
terial) 65 

Plumbers and steamfitters 1.12 

Roofers : 

Felt and gravel: patent: composition 65 

Sheet metal 1.10 

Sheet metal workers 1.10 

Shinglers (wood, asbestos) 1 .05 

Watchmen 55 



Installation of new electrical equipment for 
the Transformer Room and Distribution Sta- 
tions, Centre Block, Parliament Buildings, 
Ottawa, Ont. Name of contractor, Mr. Stanley 
G. Brookes, Ottawa, Ont. Date contract 
awarded, November 26, 1946. Amount of con- 
tract, $5,500. A fair wages schedule was in- 
cluded in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Carpenters and joiners $1 .05 

Cement finishers 75 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 80 

Gas. or elec 70 

Drivers 61 

Driver, team and wagon 95 

Electricians (inside wiremen) 1 .05 

Labourers 61 

Lathers : 

Metal 1.00 

Wood 90 

Motor truck drivers 65 

Motor truck driver and truck 1 .65 

Painters and glaziers 86 

Plasterers 1.16 

Plasterers' helpers (mixing and tempering ma- 
terial) 65 

Plumbers and steamfitters 1.12 

Sheet metal workers 1.10 

Watchmen 56 



Construction of addition to public building, 
Hull, P.Q. Name of contractors, Messrs E. 
Brunet and Sons, Hull, P.Q. Date contract 



*Per day. 



Installation of battery charging equipment, 
Postal Station "A", Toronto, Ont. Name of 
contractors, Industrial Equipment Company, 
Limited, Toronto, Ont. Date contract 
awarded, November 27, 1946. Amount of 



56 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



contract, $15,269. A fair wages schedule was 
included in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Brick and hollow tile layers $1.35 

Brick and hollow tile layers' helpers (mixing 

and tempering mortar) 71 

Carpenters and joiners 1.20 

Cement finishers 85 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 1.10 

Gas. or elec 1.10 

Electricians (inside wiremen) 1 . 27 

Labourers 65 

Lathers : 

Metal 1.30 

Wood 92 

Motor truck drivers 65 

Motor truck driver and truck 2.00 

Painters and glaziers 1 .05 

Plasterers 1.30 

Plasterers' helpers (mixing and tempering ma- 
terial) 89 

Sheet metal workers 1 .28 

Watchmen 60 

Welders and burners (acetylene or elec.) 96 



Repairs to roof of hangar, R.C.A.F. Station, 
Camp Borden, Ont. Name of contractors, 
Storrar Manufacturing Company, Weston, 
Ont. Date contract awarded, November G, 
1946. Amount of contract, $6,832. A fair 
wages schedule was included in the contract 
as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Asbestos insulation workers $ .75 

Asphalt rakers 70 

Asphalt tapers, smoothers and spreaders 60 

Brick and hollow tile layers 1.05 

Brick and hollow tile layers' helpers (mixing 

and tempering mortar) 60 

Carpenters and j oiners 1 . 00 

Enginemen, stationary 65 

Hoist operators — tower (gas. or elec.) 65 

Labourers 55 

Motor truck drivers 60 

Motor truck driver and truck 1 . 60 

Roofers : 

Felt and gravel: patent: composition 60 

Sheet metal 1 .00 

Sheet metal workers 1.00 

Shinglers (wood, asbestos) 1.00 

Truss assemblers and erectors (wood) 70 

Watchmen 50 



Construction of roads, paving and surface 
drainage, Health and Occupational Centre, Sen- 
neville, P.Q. Name of contractors, Messrs. 
Charles Duranceau Limited, Montreal, P.Q. 
Date contract awarded, November 8, 1946. 
Amount of contract, $11,655. A fair wages 
schedule was included in the contract as 
follows : — 

Per Hour 

Asphalt rakers $.78 

Asphalt tampers, smoothers and spreaders 73 

Carpenters and joiners 1 .06 

Cement finishers 89 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 89 

Gas. or elec 84 

Dragline operators (steam or gas.). 1.28 



Per Hour 

Dragline firemen 78 

Dragline oilers 73 

Drivers 67 

Driver, team and wagon 1.07 

Enginemen, stationary 78 

Labourers 67 

Motor truck drivers 67 

Motor truck driver and truck 1 .67 

Pipefitters (surface — temp, work) 78 

Pipe layers, caulkers and solderers 73 

Road grader operators : 

Horsedrawn 73 

Including team 1.07 

Gas 84 

Road roller operators (steam or gas.) 95 

Tractor operators : 

Letourneau, etc 92 

Small 77 

Watchmen 62 

Welders and burners (acetylene or elec.) 1.00 



Repairs to roofs of buildings Nos. 1, 10, 11 
and 15, R.C.A.F. Station, Victoria Island, Ot- 
tawa, Ont. Name of contractors, Messrs. 
Lowrey and O'Connor, Ottawa, Ont. Date con- 
tract awarded, November 15, 1946. Amount of 
contract, $4,300. A fair wages schedule was 
included in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Asbestos insulation workers $.80 

Asphalt rakers 75 

Asphalt tampers, smoothers and spreaders 65 

Brick and hollow tile layers 1.25 

Brick and hollow tile layers' helpers (mixing 

and tempering mortar) 65 

Carpenters and joiners 1.05 

Enginemen, stationary 70 

Hoist operators — tower (gas. or elec.) 70 

Labourers 61 

Motor truck drivers 65 

Motor truck driver and truck 1.65 

Roofers : 

Felt and gravel: patent: composition 65 

' Sheet metal 1.10 

Sheet metal workers 1.10 

Shinglers (wood, asbestos) 1 .05 

Truss assemblers and erectors (wood) 70 

Watchmen 56 



Paving of roadways to residences, R.C.N. 
College, Royal Roads, B.C. Name of con- 
tractors, Victoria Paving Company, Limited, 
Victoria, B.C. Date contract awarded, Novem- 
ber 20, 1946. Amount of contract, $2,981. A 
fair wages schedule was included in the con- 
tract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Asphalt rakers $.81 

Asphalt tampers, smoothers and spreaders 71 

Carpenters and j oiners 1 . 25 

Cement finishers 1.00 

Drivers (teamsters) 65 

Labourers 65 

Motor truck drivers: 

Under 5 tons 65 

5 tons and over 75 

Road grader operators (gas.) 1 .05 

Road roller operators (steam or gas.) 85 

Tractor operators : 

Letourneau, etc 1.05 

Small 80 

Watchmen 60 



1947] 



FAIR WAGE CONDITIONS 



57 



Installation of a standpipe system, H.M.C.S. 
"Donnacona", Montreal, P.Q. Name of 
contractors, Canadian Comstock Company, 
Limited, Montreal, P.Q. Date contract 
awarded, November 23, 1946. Amount of 
contract, $2,666. A fair wages schedule was 
included in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Electricians (inside wiremen) $1.11 

Labourers 67 

Painters (spray) 1.00 

Pipefitters (surface— temp, work) .78 

Pipe layVs, caulkers and solderers 73 

Plumbers and steamfitters 1.11 

Watchmen 62 



Repairing, paving and oiling of roads ad- 
jacent to Officers' Wardroom, Building No. 89, 
H.M.C.S. "Naden", Esquimalt, B.C. Name of 
contractors, [Victoria Paving Company, 
Limited, Victoria, B.C. Date contract awarded, 
November 30, 1946. Amount of contract, 
$5,238. A fair wages schedule was included in 
the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Asphalt rakers $.81 

Asphalt tampers, smoothers and spreaders 71 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 81 

Drivers (teamsters) 65 

Drill runners 81 

Labourers 65 

Labourers (experienced building) 71 

Motor truck drivers: 

Under 5 tons 65 

5 tons and over 75 

Enginemen, stationary 79 

Powdermen 96 

Road grader operators (gas.) 1.05 

Road roller operators (steam or gas.) 85 

Tractor operators: 

Letourneau, etc 1 .05 

Small 80 

Watchmen 60 



Alterations to Electrical and Signals Build- 
ing No. 37, H.M.C.S. "Stadacona", Halifax, 
N.S. Name of contractors, Fundy Construction 
Company, Limited, Halifax, N.S. Date con- 
tract awarded, November 21, 1946. Amount of 
contract, $30,900. A fair wages schedule was 
included in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Asbestos insulation workers $.80 

Brick and hollow tile layers 1.15 

Brick and hollow tile layers' helpers (mixing 

and tempering mortar) 65 

Carpenters and joiners 95 

Cement finishers 80 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 80 

Gas. or elec 70 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 70 

Drivers 60 

Driver, team and wagon 95 

Electricians (inside wiremen) 1.06 

Engineers, operating, steam 90 

Engineers, crane (steam, gas., elec.) 90 

Enginemen, stationary 70 

Hoist operators— tower (gas. or elec.) 70 



Per Hour 

Labourers 60 

Lathers : 

Metal 80 

Wood 75 

Linoleum layers 70 

Marble setters 1 . 15 

Marble setters' helpers (all men assigned to help 

tradesmen) 65 

Mastic floor layers 85 

Mastic floor rubbers and finishers 70 

Mastic floor kettlemen 70 

Mastic floor labourers 65 

Motor truck drivers 65 

Motor truck driver and truck 1 .65 

Ornamental iron workers 70 

Painters (spray) 91 

Painters and glaziers 81 

Pipefitters (surface — temp, work) 70 

Pipe layers, caulkers and solderers 70 

Plasterers 95 

Plasterers' helpers (mixing and tempering ma- 
terial) 65 

Plumbers and steamfitters 1.02 J 

Riggers (general) 70 

Roofers : 

Felt and gravel: patent: composition 65 

Sheet metal 85 

Rodmen (reinforced steel) 70 

Sheet metal workers 85 

Structural steel workers 90 

Terrazzo layers 85 

Terrazzo finishers and helpers 70 

Tile setters: 

Asphalt 85 

Ceramic 1-15 

Tile setters' helpers (all men assigned to help 

tradesmen) 65 

Tractor operators : 

Letourneau, etc 85 

Small 70 

Watchmen 55 

Waxers and polishers (floor) 65 

Welders and burners : 

Acetylene or elec 85 

On steel erection 90 



Department of Transport 

Construction of a fog alarm building at Flat 
Point Lightstation, Entrance to Sydney Har- 
bour, N.S. Name of contractor, Mr. R. G. 
McDougall, Sydney, N.S. Date of contract, 
November 2, 1946. Amount of contract, 
$8,240. A fair wages schedule was included in 
the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Cement finishers $ .80 

Labourers 59£ 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 80 

Gas. or elec 70 

Carpenters and joiners 96 

Painters and glaziers 81 

Plumbers and steamfitters 90 

Shinglers (asbestos) 96 

Motor truck driver and truck 1.65 



Development of airport, Lac La Biche, Alta. 
Name of contractors, Western Construction 
and Lumber Company, Limited, Edmonton, 
Alta. Date of contract, November 20, 1946. 



58 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



Amount of contract, $114,240. A fair wages 
schedule was included in the contract as 
follows : — 

Per Hour 
Axemen $ .05 

Blacksmiths 90 

Blacksmiths' helpers 81 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 85 

Dragline operators (steam or gas.) 1 .25 

Dragline firemen 70 

Dragline oilers 70 

Drivers 65 

Drill runners 85 

Engineers, operating, steam 1 .25 

Enginemen, stationary 70 

Labourers 60 

Motor truck drivers 65 

Powdermen 85 

Road grader operators 1 .00 

Road roller operators (steam or gas.) 1.00 

Steam shovel engineers 1.25 

Steam shovel firemen 70 

Steam shovel oilers 70 

Shovel operators (gas.) 1 .05 

Tractor operators 1 .05 

Watchmen 60 



Wartime Housing Limited 

Construction of houses and underground 
services, Montreal East, P.Q. Name of con- 
tractors, Messrs. J. L. E. Price and Company, 
Montreal, P.Q. Date contract awarded, Novem- 
ber 2, 1946. Amount of contract, $30,000. A 
fair wages schedule was included in the con- 
tract as follows: 

Per Hour 

Asphalt rakers $ .78 

Asphalt tampers, smoothers and spreaders 73 

Blacksmiths 90 

Blacksmiths' helpers 73 

Brick and hollow tile layers 1.17 

Brick and hollow tile layers' helpers (mixing 

and tempering mortar) 73 

Carpenters and joiners 1.06 

Cement finishers 89 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 89 

Gas. or elec 84 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 84 

Dragline operators (steam or gas. ) 1.28 

Dragline firemen 78 

Dragline oilers 73 

Drivers 67 

Driver, team and wagon 1.07 

Drill runners 78 

Electricians (inside wiremen) 1.11 

Engineers, operating, steam 1 .00 

Enginemen, stationary 73 

Labourers 67 

Lathers : 

Metal 1.06 

Wood 95 

Motor truck drivers 67 

Motor truck driver and truck 1.67 

Ornamental iron workers 90 

Painters (spray) 1.00 

Painters and glaziers 95 

Pipefitters (surface — temp, work) 78 

Pipe layers, caulkers and solderers 73 

Plasterers 1.17 

Plasterers' helpers (mixing and tempering ma- 
terial) 73 

Plumbers and steamfitters 1.11 



Per Hour 

Riggers (general) 78 

Road grader operators: 

Horsedrawn 73 

Including team 1 .07 

Gas 84 

Road roller operators (steam or gas.) 95 

Rodmen (reinforced steel) 84 

Roofers : 

Felt and gravel: patent-: composition 78 

Sheet metal 1.06 

Sheet metal workers 1 .06 

Shinglers (wood, asbestos) 1.06 

Steam shovel engineers 1 . 28 

Steam shovel firemen 78 

Steam shovel oilers 73 

Shovel operators (gas.) 1.28 

Tractor operators: 

Letourneau, etc 92 

Small 77 

Watchmen 62 

Welders and burners (acetylene or elec.) 1 .00 



Construction of houses and underground 
services, Montreal South, P.Q. Name of con- 
tractors, Messrs. G. Archambault, Ltd., Mont- 
real, P.Q. Date contract awarded, November 
7, 1946. Amount of contract, $30,000. A fair 
wages schedule in the same terms as the one 
next above was included in the contract. 



Alterations to existing buildings, Lachine, 
P.Q. Name of contractors, Messrs. G. Archam- 
bault, Ltd., Montreal, P.Q. Date contract 
awarded, November 19, 1946. Amount of con- 
tract, $20,037.06. A fair wages schedule was 
included in the contract as follows: — 

Per Hour 

Asphalt rakers $ .78 

Asphalt tampers, smoothers and spreaders 73 

Brick and hollow tile layers 1.17 

Brick and hollow tile layers' helpers (mixing 

and tempering mortar) 73 

Carpenters and joiners 1.06 

Cement finishers 89 

Cement and concrete mixer operators: 

Steam 89 

Gas. or elec 84 

Compressor operators (gas. or elec.) 84 

Dragline operators (steam or gas.) 1 .28 

Dragline firemen 78 

Dragline oilers 73 

Drivers 67 

Driver, team and wagon 1.07 

Drill runners 78 

Electricians (inside wiremen) 1.11 

Engineers, operating, steam 1 .00 

Engineers, crane (steam, gas., elec.) 1 .00 

Enginemen, stationary 78 

Hoist operators— tower (gas. or elec.) 84 

Labourers 67 

Lathers : 

Metal I- 06 

Wood 95 

Motor truck drivers 67 

Motor truck driver and truck 1.67 

Ornamental iron workers 90 

Painters (spray) 1-W 

Painters and glaziers 95 

Pipefitters (surface— temp, work) 78 






1947] FAIR WAGE 

Per Hour 

Pipe layers, caulkers and solderers 73 

Plasterers 1.17 

Plasterers' helpers (mixing and tempering ma- 
terial) 73 

Plumbers and steamfitters 1.11 

Riggers (general) 7S 

Road grader operators : 

Horsedrawn 73 

Including team 1 .07 

Gas 84 

Road roller operators (steam or gas.) 95 

Rodmen (reinforced steel) 84 

Roofers : 

Felt and gravel: patent: composition 7S 

Sheet metal ..„ 1.06 

Sheet metail workers 1.06 

Shinglers (wood, asbestos) 1 .06 

Steam shovel engineers 1 .28 

Steam shovel firemen 78 

Steamshovel oilers 73 

Shovel operators (gas.) 1.28 

Tractor operators : 

Letourneau, etc 92 

Small 77 

Watchmen 62 

Welders and burners (acetylene or elec.) 1.00 



CONDITIONS 



59 



(2) Dredging Work 

Note: The labour conditions of contracts 
of this nature contain the General Fair Wages 
Clause providing for the observance of cur- 
rent or fair and reasonable rates of wages 
and hours of labour, and also empower the 
Minister of Labour to deal with any dispute 
which may arise thereon. 



Department of Public Works 



Dredging work, Nicomen Slough, Fraser 
River, B.C. Name of contractors, Straits Tow- 
ing and Salvage Company, Limited, Van- 
couver, B.C. Date of contract, November 9, 
1946. Amount of contract, approximately 
$14,240. 

Dredging work, Port Mouton and Central 
Port Mouton, N.S. Name of contractors, The 
J. P. Porter Company, Limited, Montreal, 
P.Q. Date of cotnract, October 26, 1946. 
Amount of contract, approximately $78,339. 



The following contract, executed for the 
Department of Public Works, also contained 
the General Fair Wages Clause: 

Docking, cleaning, painting and repairing of 
Dredge P.WX). No. 305 "King Edward". 
Name of contractors, The B.C. Marine En- 
gineers and Shipbuilders, Limited, Vancouver, 
B.C. Date of contract, November 6, 1946. 
Amount of contract, $8,778 and unit prices. 



Contracts for the Manufacture of Supplies 
and Equipment 

No. of Aggregate 
Department Contracts Amount 

Post Office 13 102,993.71 

Reconstruction and Supply 3,850 1,813,562.00 



Labour Law 



Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 



IN British Columbia, the eight and 44-hour 
limits set by the Hours of Work Act are 
now to apply to cemetery workers. The 
annual supplementary minimum wage orders 
and the hours of work order regulating over- 
time and requiring payments of time and 
one-half in retail stores during the Christmas 
season were issued in November. Ontario 
has laid down higher minimum standards of 
first-aid equipment for employers. In Sas- 
katchewan, barbering and beauty culture have 
been brought under the Apprenticeship Act, 
and new regulations made governing both 
trades for which the term of apprenticeship 
is 18 months. Minimum rates of wages estab- 
lished by these regulations are for a 48-hour 
week for barbers and for a 43-hour week for 
beauty-shop operators. 

Alberta Government Liquor Control Act 

Restrictions on the employment of women 
and boys in licensed premises are continued 
by the new regulations made by the Alberta 
Liquor Control Board on Novemer 26, 
gazetted and effective on December 14. 
Previous regulations are repealed. 

As before, no person under 21 may be 
employed in connection with the sale, 
handling or serving of beer in any licensed 
club, canteen or hotel, nor, except on written 
permit from the Board, may any female 
other than a licensee or the wife of a licensee 
be so employed in or about that portion of 
any hotel premises licensed for the sale of 
beer. 

British Columbia Hours of Work Act 

To the list of industries and occupations in 
which hours are limited to eight in a day 
and 44 in a week, the occupation of cemetery 
workers was added by regulations of 
December 6, gazetted December 12, amending 
the schedule to the Hours of Work Act. 



British Columbia Minimum Wage Acts and 
Hours of Work Act 

Overtime in shops during the Christmas 
season was again permitted at the rate of 
time and one-half by the annual supple- 
mentary Orders 24 and 59 under the Female 
and Male Minimum Wage Acts, respectively, 
and the temporary order under the Hours of 
Work Act. 

The Hours Order permitted retail shop- 
workers in Vancouver and district, Victoria, 
Esquimalt, Oak Bay and Saanich to work on 
December 21 and December 23 two hours 
beyond the daily eight-hour limit set by the 
Act. For such overtime or for time over 44 
hours during the week ending December 21, 
the minimum wage Orders required time and 
one-half the regular rates to be paid. 

Three hours overtime on December 21 and 
two hours on December 23 were permitted 
for workers in shops in other parts of the 
Province and similar provision made for over- 
time payment except that no special over- 
time payment was required for Saturday, 
December 21. 

To all girls and women temporarily 
employed in shops 39 hours or more in a 
week between December 5 and December 31 
inclusive, the regular weekly rate of $17 for 
experienced employees was to be paid, and 
during the same period both male and female 
temporary part-time workers of any age were 
to receive at least 45 cents an hour, the rate 
set for part-time workers by revised Order 
24 (July, 1946). The provisions of both 
minimum wage orders guaranteeing a daily 
minimum wage for part-time workers were 
waived during this time. 

Ontario Workmen's Compensation Act 

Revised regulations under the above Act 
establishing minimum standards of first-aid 
equipment for employers were approved by 



60 



LABOUR LAW 



61 



Order in Council on November 28 and 
gazetted December 14. Additions and varia- 
tions are made in the instruments, drugs and 
dressings required to be maintained by 
employers within the scope of the Act. The 
provision has been omitted which required a 
notice to be posted, where more than 15 are 
usually employed, warning of the danger of 
neglecting slight injuries and requiring the 
accident to be reported. 

Saskatchewan Apprenticeship Act 

A proclamation of December 6, 1946, adds 
barbering and beauty culture to the schedule 
which enumerates trades to which the 
Apprenticeship Act applies. 

Regulations, effective January 2, 1947, 
governing these trades were approved by 
Order in Council on December 6 and gazetted 
December 21. To enter the barbering or 
beauty culture trade as an apprentice a person 
must be 16, must have attended a registered 
trade school for barbering or beauty culture 
for not less than six months and, after passing 
a trade test, have obtained a certificate, and 
must enter a contract of apprenticeship for a 
further term of 18 months. 

The normal work-week for which wages are 
set by these regulations is 48 hours for 
barbering and 43 for beauty culture, unless 
another is approved by the Director of 
Apprenticeship. 

No contract of apprenticeship may be 
approved whereby either barbers' or beauty- 
shop operators' rates of wages in cities or 
in the towns of Canora, Kamsack, Melville, 
Shaunavon, Lloydminster, Estevan, Humboldt 
and Wynyard are less than $16, $18.50, and 
$20 per week for the three six-month periods, 
respectively. For both trades in smaller 
places minimum rates are $14, $16, and $18.50 
per week. For the six months spent in trade 
school no wages are allowed. 

Each barber and each beauty-shop operator 
may employ one apprentice and for every 
four barbers or four beauticians employed, an 
additional apprentice. 

Applications for examination for registra- 
tion as an apprentice must be on a form 
furnished by the Apprenticeship Board and 
must set out qualifications, age, academic 
standing and any other information required. 



The Board must notify all eligible candidates 
and must appoint an examining board to 
conduct written or oral examinations and trade 
tests. Upon the examining board's recom- 
mendation, the Director must issue a certificate 
in form approved by the Board entitling the 
candidate to carry on his trade. If a candi- 
date fails to pass his examinations and has 
completed at least 4,000 hours of training, 
including schooling and shop experience,, the 
Director must, on the candidate's application, 
arrange with the examining board for further 
examinations. 

Certificates may be cancelled by the 
Director on the recommendation of the 
Provincial Apprenticeship Board for imper- 
sonation at an examination or for any 
improper practice in connection with the 
trade. No cancellation may take effect until 
30 days after the offender has been notified. 
Appeal from such order may be made at any 
time before cancellation becomes effective. 
Upon hearing the appeal the Board may 
confirm, modify or rescind the order. 

The employer must register all contracts of 
apprenticeship with the Director and must 
forward to the Director any reports required. 

The Director must arrange for periodic 
inspection of each apprentice's progress. He 
must furnish to each apprentice an identifica- 
tion card which must be carried at all times. 
He may give credit to any member or 
discharged member of the Armed Forces who 
has had or is taking training under any 
approved rehabilitation plan. 

Subject to the Act, an apprentice may be 
transferred from one employer to another in 
the same trade. 

The general regulations governing appren- 
ticeship and tradesmen's qualification in trades 
designated under the Act (L.G., 1946, p. 833) 
were also amended by an Order in Council 
of December 6, gazetted December 21. 
Effective January 2, 1947, the amended regu- 
lations provide that a barber or beauty-shop 
operator may be granted a certificate of 
qualification if during the preceding five years 
(eight in the case of ex-servicemen) he or 
she has served over two years in the barbering 
or beauty culture trade. If he has served 
less than two years, he must sit for an oral 
or written examination or practical trade test, 
as the board may decide. 



62 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



American State Labour Legislation in 1946 



LABOUR laws of special interest which 
were enacted in several American States 
in 1946 had to do with child labour, minimum 
wages for men, migratory farm workers, 
workmen's compensation for second injuries, 
and industrial disputes. 



and housing of these workers. Where any 
violation of the Public Health Law or Sanitary 
Code in any labour camp continues after 
notice by a State Health Officer, the latter 
may institute proceedings to prohibit the oper- 
ation of the camp. 



Child Labour 

Child labour laws were enacted in Georgia, 
Massachusetts and New York. In Georgia the 
minimum age for work at any time in 
factories, workshops, and laundries was raised 
from 14 to 16 years. For employment in 
any gainful occupation during school hours, 
a 16-year minimum age has been established 
and a 14-year minimum for employment out- 
side school hours except that under certain 
conditions boys of 12 or 13 may be employed 
outside school hours in or about shops. No 
person under 16 may be employed for more 
than eight hours in a day or 40 in a week. 
The Act does not apply to agriculture or 
domestic service in private homes. 

A child under 14 may not be employed in 
Massachusetts on a farm for more than four 
hours in a day or 24 hours in a week unless 
the farm is owned or operated by a relation 
by blood or marriage. The same statute 
prohibits the employment of any child under 
16 in the operation of certain saws except on 
a farm of a relation by blood or marriage. 

In New York a provisional Act permitting 
children of 14 and 15 to leave school for farm 
work and children of 16 and over to leave 
school for work in canneries, greeni-houses and 
milk plants, for not more than 30 days in a 
year, was extended until July 1, 1947. 

Wages 

The Massachusetts minimum wage law 
applying to women and minors was extended 
to men as had already been done in 
Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and 
Rhode Island. A Rhode Island law of 1946, 
like one in Massachusetts in 1945, prohibits 
any difference in wage rates on account of 
sex for work of comparable character or on 
comparable operations. 

Migratory Labour 

Any person who employs, transports, or 
brings into New York State ten or more out- 
of-State farm or food-processing workers must 
submit to the State Industrial Commissioner 
facts concerning the wages, conditions of work 



Workmen's Compensation 

Workmen's compensation legislation was 
amended in Kentucky to establish "a second- 
injury fund", bringing up to 33 the number 
of States making such provision in order to 
encourage the employment of workers handi- 
capped by an earlier injury. Under these laws, 
when a workman who is drawing compensa- 
tion for an industrial accident suffers a second 
injury, his employer, or the insurance company 
or the State fund, as the case may be, is 
liable only for the disability caused by the 
second injury and not for the cumulative 
effect of the two injuries, but from a special 
fund created for the purpose, compensation 
is payable for the combined effect of the two 
accidents. In most States this special fund is 
built up by requiring payments from employ- 
ers in fatal cases where there are no depend- 
ants eligible for compensation. These pay- 
ments range from $300 to $1,400 in different 
States. 

Industrial Relations 

In New Jersey, a new law applying to public 
utilities guarantees to labour the right to 
organize and bargain collectively, and author- 
izes the State Board of Mediation to settle 
disputes concerning representation and bargain- 
ing units. Collective agreements covering 
public utilities must run for at least a year 
and remain in force from year to year there- 
after unless notice of desired changes is given 
m writing. Five days are allowed for the 
conclusion of a new agreement after which 
public hearings are held and recommendations 
made to the State Governor. The Governor 
is authorized to seize and operate any public 
utility, in the event of a strike or lockout 
or failure to abide by the recommendations 
for settlement so as to threaten a stoppage 
of work. 

In New York the State Mediation Board, 
its membership increased from five to seven, 
was given power to act as a voluntary arbi- 
tration board. Where the public interest is 
affected the board may appoint special 
mediators with the same authority as board 
members. 



Rehabilitation 



Analysis of Use Being Made of Rehabilitation Aids and 
National Employment Service 



THE downward trend in discharges from 
the armed forces continued during 
October when a monthly decrease of more 
than 4,000 was recorded. Demobilization 
was not expected to exceed 6,000 in November 
and 4,000 in December. This low rate was 
expected to ease the labour situation somewhat. 

The demand for the various rehabilitation 
aids continued high in all fields. However, 
there was a decrease in the number of awards 
granted under the Post-Discharge Re-establish- 
ment Order and the number qualifying under 
the Veterans' Land Act, an indication of the 
decreased activity during the winter months. 

More ex-servicemen registered for work at 
National Employment Service offices in 
October than in the previous month. An 
increasing number of these are World War 
II veterans who have been previously em- 
ployed since their discharge. Both general 
and "handicap" placements showed increases 
while reinstatements in civil employment con- 
tinued to taper off. 

While an increase was reported in the 
number registering for work during the 
month, the number unplaced at the month-end 
had decreased. Also, the number unplaced 15 
days or more showed a decline. The occupa- 
tional pattern of the unplaced showed little 
change from that of the previous month; the 
percentage of unskilled being greater than 
skilled. It is expected that the slowing-up of 
summer industries will be compensated some- 
what by an increasing demand for additional 
help during the Christmas season and for 
workers in manufacturing industries and 
logging camps. 

The education and training of ex-service 
personnel is playing a major part in their 
rehabilitation and everything possible is being 
done to meet the demand. 

Post-Discharge Re-establishment Order 

The September increase of 6,000 in awards 
granted, which was brought about through 
renewed activity in universities and training 
centres was followed by a decrease in October 
of more than 7,000. The overall decline dur- 



ing the current month, however, was more 
the result of a 5,000 drop in benefits under 
"awaiting returns" than the decrease in uni- 
versity and training awards. During October, 
18,524 awards were granted bringing to 250,589, 
the number granted by this Order. Over the 
same period, 237,105 persons received awards. 
The number of persons assisted is smaller than 
the number of awards granted as some per- 
sons receive assistance under more than one 
type of benefit. In October, 131,308 persons 
received allowances and 107,995 were "on 
benefit" at the end of the month. 

Out-oJ-Work-Benefits. — The number of 
awards granted to jobless ex-servicemen 
showed only a minor decrease during October 
when 7,649 awards were granted as compared 
with 7,794 in September. There were 28,716 
persons receiving payments during the month 
and 17,795 were "on benefit" at the end of 
the month. The corresponding figures for 
September were 31,877 and 19,352. 

Vocational Training. — A drop of approxi- 
mately 1,000 took place in the number of 
veterans granted assistance under this clause. 
However, both allowances paid during the 
month and those "on benefit" at the end had 
increased, from 36,882 and 32334 in September 
to 39,057 and 34,032 in October. 

Awaiting Returns. — After showing an in- 
crease of 4,000 in September, the number 
awaiting returns from businesses dropped by 
5,000 in October to stand at 3,784. There were 
20,731 receiving allowances during the month 
and 16,489 "on benefit" at the month-end. 

Temporary Incapacity.— -Veterans granted 
awards due to temporary incapacity totalled 
112 during October while 132 were in receipt 
of allowances. The number of persons re- 
ceiving assistance at the end of the period 
dropped from 59 at September 30 to 49 at 
October 31. 

University Education. — Benefits were granted 
to 2,084 ex-servicemen in October. During the 
month, 42,672 persons received allowances and 
at the end of the period 39,630 were still "on 
benefit". The corresponding figures for Sep- 
tember were 34,038 and 30,941. 



63 



79014—5 



64 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



Table A shows the trend of benefits paid 
under the Post-Discharge Re-establishment 
Order. 



is essential that the applicant have an 
assured income from an independent 
source. Frequently, therefore, applica- 



TABLE A— TOTAL AWARDS UNDER THE POST-DISCHARGE RE-ESTABLISHMENT 
ORDER, MONTHLY, OCTOBER, 1945 TO OCTOBER, 1946 



Month 


Out-of- 
Work 


Vocational 
Training 


Awaiting 
Returns 


Temporary 
Incapacity 


University 
Education 


Total 


Prior to 


8,813 

440 
1,004 
1,971 
6,878 
8,265 
19,749 
6,642 
6,808 
10,387 
14,299 
10,227 
7,794 
7,649 


13,842 

1,355 
2,427 
3,460 
2,429 
1,239 
2,453 


2,262 

191 
299 
364 
901 
493 
330 


3,506 

17 
31 
31 
68 
21 
29 


3,573 

2,257 
4,770 
5,185 
2,269 
3,739 
9,746 


31,996 


October, 1945 


4,260 




8,531 




11,011 




12,545 


February, 1946 


13, 757 




32,307 






May (a) 1946 


7,729 
7,617 
5,148 
3,146 
5,872 
4,895 


1,635 
3,605 
3,838 
4,352 
8,739 
3,784 


87 
157 
105 

60 
147 
112 


213 
1,548 
2,831 
1,678 
2,994 
2,084 


23,114 


June 1946 


23,314 


July 1946 


26,221 




19,463 




25, 546 


October, 1946 


18,524 


Total to October 31, 1946 


110,926 


61,612 


30,793 


4,371 


42,887 


250,589 







(a) Statistics for April and May combined. 

Veterans' Land Act 

At the end of October, 48,419 ex-servicemen 
had qualified for benefits under the Veterans' 
Land Act. Of the number qualified, 19,785 
have been actually established in farming or 
fishing activities. In addition, grants were 
allowed to 289 Indians settling on reserve 
lands. During October, 2,278 ex-service per- 
sonnel qualified while 2,480 were established. 
The number of veterans applying for benefits 
under this Act is small largely because of the 
strict provisions of the Act. The main 
provisions are listed below. 

(1) The applicant must satisfy the officials 
that he is qualified to produce results 
in his chosen field. This takes time 
and tends to slow down the number of 
those qualifying each month. 

(2) In order to qualify as eligible for 
benefits to settle on a small holding, it 

TABLE B— APPLICANTS WHO HAVE QU 
VETERANS' LAND ACT, MONTHLY, 



tions for small holding benefits are 
delayed while the veterans find suitable 
employment which will provide them 
with a steady income. 

(3) A veteran may apply for benefits under 
the Veterans' Land Act at any time 
after discharge. For this reason the 
number who will ultimately take 
advantage of the Act will naturally be 
spread over a considerable number of 
years. 

(4) Once qualified to receive benefits, a 
veteran is advised to move slowly but 
surely in becoming established. This 
explains why the numbers established 
are small in comparison with the 
numbers qualifying under the Veterans' 
Land Act. 

Table B which follows, shows by months 
the number qualified under the three types 
of holdings of the Veterans' Land Act. 

ALIFIED FOR BENEFITS UNDER THE 
OCTOBER, 1945 TO OCTOBER, 1946 



Month 



Full Time 


Small 


Farming 


Holding 


2,191 


3,994 


917 


1,065 


1,396 


1,213 


1,152 


949 


1,703 


1,571 


1,872 


1,644 


2,436 


2,140 


2,579 


2,269 


2,570 


2,514 


2,072 


2,204 


2,138 


2,309 


1,790 


2,451 


1,455 


1,304 


1,499 


751 



Commercial 
Fishing 



Total 



Qualified prior to 
October, 1945 

October, 1945.... 
November, 1945. 
December, 1945.. 
January, 1946. . . . 
February, 1946... 

March, 1946 

April, 1946 

May, 1946 

June, 1946 

July, 1946 

August, 1946 

September, 1946. 
October, 1946.... 



82 



5,267 
J.010 



31 


2,640 


30 


2,131 


56 


3,330 


51 


3,567 


69 


4. 1145 


61 


4,909 


48 


5,132 


34 


4,311 


59 


4,506 


72 


4,313 


55 


2,814 


88 


2,278 



1947] 



REHABILITATION 



65 



Student Veterans at Canadian Universities 

NEARLY 16,000 veterans of World War II Veterans Affairs, semi-monthly publication of 

are enrolled as undergraduate students at the Department of Veterans Affairs, gives a 

Canadian Universities. The following table, breakdown of student veterans receiving 

published in the December 15 issue of allowances from D.V.A. by faculty and year. 



— 


1st Yr. 


2nd Yr. 


3rd Yr. 


4th and 

Subseq. 
Years 


Total 




6,802 

3,680 

829 

496 

574 

461 

273 

176 

206 

247 

173 

127 

115 

64 

68 

24 

37 

34 

49 

24 


. 5, 764 

2,870 

815 

488 

389 

184 

245 

220 

188 

217 

138 

95 

77 

30 

13 

46 

5 

32 

17 

11 


2,313 

699 

328 

123 

98 

43 

45 

80 

80 

35 

35 

11 

6 


887 

265 

141 

66 

36 

18 

10 

46 

46 

2 

20 

6 


15,766 




7,514 




2,113 




1.173 




1,097 




706 




573 




522 




520 




501 


Art (University) 


366 




239 




198 






94 


Theology (University) 


3 

11 
7 
5 




84 




1 

32 

3 


82 




81 




74 




66 




3 




38 









Veterans' Training Facilitates Employment 



Canada's training plan for its veterans is 
resulting in a high ratio of employment for 
those veterans taking training, according to 
a survey recently completed in the New 
Brunswick District of the Department of Vet- 
erans Affairs. Results of the survey were 
announced early in January by the Right 
Honourable Ian A. Mackenzie, Minister of 
Veterans Affairs. He stated that in the sample 
taken of those who had completed training, 
only 5-98 per cent were not working, and 83 
per cent were employed in those occupations 
for which they were trained. 

"Coming as they did from our New Bruns- 
wick District, these figures are particularly 
encouraging," the Minister said. "The Mari- 
times have presented one of our most difficult 
employment areas and, as a matter of fact, 
roughly seven per cent of all veterans on our 
out-of-work benefits in Canada were resident 
in New Brunswick at the end of the year. 
It is apparent, therefore, that the training 
program for veterans is paying dividends in 
employment." 

The survey was made of 1,022 veterans. 



Of these 858, or roughly 83-86 per cent were 
employed, 32 were in hospital and there were 
58 of whom the Department had no record. 
Only 74 of the total were unemployed at 
the time the survey was made. Of the 518 
in the group, that had completed their train- 
ing, only 32 had gone into other occupations. 

A further group of 378 did not complete 
their training but results in these cases also 
indicated that even incomplete training was 
likely to lead to employment for, of the group, 
144 were employed at the trades for which 
they had been partially trained. Another 
134 had gone into different employment, 
while 33 had stopped their training in order 
to re-enlist in the Armed Forces. 

A third group was made up of 126 who 
interrupted their training for various reasons 
but plan to complete it at a later date. Of 
this group 50 were working at the trades for 
which they started their training, while another 
group of 22, who interrupted training for 
compassionate reasons, were reported to be 
employed in their own homes. A group of 
32 were hospitalized or ill at home, while 9 
were working at some other trade. 



79014— 5% 



Vocational Training 



Training of Discharged Members of the Armed Forces 

T^HE number of new trainees enrolled dur- number on the waiting list in certain trades 
*■ ing the month of November in all at different training centres indicates that 
branches of Vocational Training was 5,494 there will be no increase in enrolment in the 
(4,926 men; 568 women). The number under trades concerned, recommendations have been 
training at the end of November, 1946, was made that steps should be taken to revise 
■38,299 (34,843 men; 3,456 women). The break- capacities. Regional Directors have been in- 
'down in the different types of training may be structed to reduce the instructional staff or 
.-studied from the table on page 67. to consolidate two or more classes at one 
A point to note in the November report school. Utmost economy in expenditures has 
iis the fact that the number in training has been recommended without in any way inter- 
increased approximately 1,300 over the pre- fering with the efficiency of training to be 
vious month's report. It is difficult to estimate given. It is anticipated that within the next 
if this number will increase. However, with the f ew months there will be a very substan- 
cessation of hostilities declared as of Decern- tial and permanent decrease in enrolment 
ber, 1946, a more accurate estimate is antici- there fore, careful study is being given to 
pated for the remaining of the traimng revision of citieg> 
program for ex-service personnel. 

Training in Industry has shown an increase w , T . . 

since March from 7,334 to 11,525 in November. taming 

Training in Correspondence and Pre-matricu- From April 1, 1945 to November 30, 1946, 

lation has shown a decrease from 9,866 to g,224 women have enrolled under the CVT 

7,661. Training in private and C.V.T. schools program for training. Five hundred and sixty- 

i'nNovember ^ eight ° f this nUmber em "° lled during N ° Vem " 

ber 1946. There has been a steady increase in 

The back-log for November has been de- numhers f women taking training since the 

creased by approximate y 300 since October. b iani of the program . In t he C.V.T. 

It is noteworthy that of this back-log of ap- C , ,i. *. i r *i. 

i. i ooaa ( at ™u +u + ice/' schools the most popular courses for the 

proximately 2,800 for November, that 1,666 , , , , 

-« ok n „™ oc "o^o^inn. f^r^™" ir, o^r^r, women veterans have been in order: commer- 

are shown as awaiting training in seven . 

trades namely: nial; pre-matnculation ; dressmaking; hair- 
dressing and practical nursing. In the private 

1 . Pre-matnculation 410 schoolg . commercial . dressmaking ; hair- 

' _ T ar , enn & • * : dressing and handicrafts have proven to be the 

3. Watch Repair 241 ~T . U1 c .. - . . . 

4. Motor Mechanics 221 most desirable fields *°\ tra f m S- ^ niterest- 

5 Grannie Arts 151 ing P omfc to note 1S t " e ^ act t ^ a * practical 

6'. Hotels and Restaurants.'.'!!.' 120 nursing, or training in the Auxiliary Services 

7. Photography 117 ^° Nursing, is now rated as fifth in demand 

for training by women veterans. 

With the present training facilities such as 

tihey are this waiting list is not considered Cumulative Enrolment 
alarming. Another point to bear in mind is 

the fact that dates of admission to vocational From the beginning of the program up to 

training classes are purposely maintained November 30, 1946, the gross enrolment in all 

flexible so that further admission is possible types of projects is 236,302, made up as fol- 

immediately trainees graduate. lows: Discharged members of the forces, 

During November no new types of training 104,325; Industrial Supervisors and Foreman- 
were opened but it has been found necessary ship Training, 131,977—315,337 comes under 
to review the present accommodation as sur- the projects which were instituted for War 
plus to demand in certain centres. Where the Industry or Service Tradesmen. 

66 



VOCATIONAL TRAINING 



67 



Vocational Training Projects 

Canadian Vocational Training sponsored by 
the Dominion Department of Labour, in co- 
operation with the Provincial Governments, 
continues to carry on the following types of 
projects: 

1. Vocational and Pre-matriculation Train- 
ing of discharged members of the forces. 



2. Training of Apprentices. 

3. Retraining of workers released from 
employment. 

4. Training of Foremen and Supervisors. 

5. Training of young people and assistants 
to students. 

6. Dominion financial assistants to the Pro- 
vinces for Vocational Training at secon- 
dary level. 



NUMBER IN TRAINING IN REHABILITATION CLASSES AS OF|NOVEMBER[30, 1946 

With Totals at October 31, 1946 





P.E.I. 


N.S. 


N.B. 


Que. 


Ont. 


Man. 


Sask. 


Alta. 


B.C. 


Total at 

Nov. 30, 

1946 


Total at 

Oct. 31, 

1946 




Training-on-the-Job at Nov. 
30, 1946 — 

Men 


67 


353 
2 


231 
6 


2,004 
33 


6,195 

94 


854 
11 


328 
9 


692 

18 


619 
9 


11,343 

182 


11,283 




185 








Total 


67 


355 


237 


2,037 


6,289 


865 


337 


710 


628 


11,525 


11,468 


Correspondence and Pre-Mat- 
ric. Classes at Nov. 30, 
1946— 

Men 


52 
4 


293 
10 


223 
16 


842 
3 


3,929 
169 


336 
34 


531 

91 


551 
39 


502 
36 


7,259 
402 


7,044 


Women 


392 


Total 


56 


303 


239 


845 


4,098 


370 


622 


590 


538 


7,661 


7,436 


C.V.T. Schools and others at 
Nov. 30, 1946 — 

Men 

Women 


102 
21 


1,154 
130 


900 
176 


3,705 
391 


6,479 

974 


931 
226 


873 
162 


980 
319 


1,117 
473 


16,241 
2,872 


15,309 

2,785- 


Total 


123 


1,284 


1,076 


4,096 


7,453 


1,157 


1,035 


1,299 


1,590 


19,113 


18,094 







Note— Numbers who have received training from commencement of Program to November 30, 1946 104,325 



Regional Conferences on Vocational Training 



A CONFERENCE of Canadian Vocational 
** Training officials, Ontario Region, was 
held in Hamilton on December 11. Several 
administrative problems were discussed and 
decisions reached, among them the following: 

Discussions during the Canadian Vocational 
Training sessions yielded the following 
results : — 

Intake Dates. — It was agreed that intake dates 
for students would be on the first Monday or 
Tuesday of each month. 

Consolidation of Classes. — Frequent review of 
class numbers is now important. When the 
number falls to about six or less, steps will be 
taken to close the class and reallocate the 
remaining students upon proper authority. 

Matriculation Classes. — All training plans will 
be governed by the decision to discontinue 
pre-matriculation classes in the mid-summer 
of 1947. 

Increased Length of Courses. — Suggestions to 
lengthen certain courses related to building 
trades to meet seasonal employment problems 
received no support. 



Joint Session With Officials of Department of 
Veterans Affairs 

Following the meeting a joint conference 
was held with officials of the Department of 
Veterans Affairs on December 11 and 12.- 
Those present included Regional Officials,. 
Directors of Institutes, District Supervisors of 
Canadian Vocational Training, representatives 
of the various Department of Veterans Affairs 
Districts in the Province and Brig. J. E. Lyon 
and A. W. Crawford, representing respec- 
tively, the Head Offices of Canadian Voca- 
tional Training and the Department of 
Veterans Affairs. During certain portions of 
the meetings, representatives of the National 
Employment Service, including Mr. Bart. 
M. Sullivan and Mr. Fred Hawes, Ontario 
Apprenticeship Board, were present. 

Selected chairmen acted as discussion leaders 
for the various topics considered. A summary 
of the points covered is given below: — 

Selection for Training. — In connection with 
pre-matriculation applicants, emphasis was 
given to the need for testing those below 



68 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



Grade XII level. Entrance qualifications as 
to academic background were discussed at 
length. 

Planning for the Future. — The need for 
economy was emphasized. Included in the 
question of class consolidation was that of 
providing authority for transportation of 
students from one Institute to another. Pre- 
matriculation classes would end on or about 
August 15, 1947, the last intake for the 6- 
months' course being in February and for a 
^months' course, April. 

Training in C.V.T. Institutes. — The length 
of the various courses, as presently established 
was agreed as adequate. Brig. Lyon stressed 
that C.V.T. could not favour any policy 
whereby Institutes became a parking place 
for the unemployed. In this connection Mr. 
Bart Sullivan, N.E.S., told of arrangements 
for an intensive drive for placement of C.V.T. 
graduates. District officers of C.V.T. requested 
further leeway in the placement of C.V.T. 
graduates. 

Training-on-the-Job. — Records indicated that 
the number of contracts over 12 months in 
length had been considerably reduced. Desir- 
ability of a series of model contract forms 
covering standard types of arrangements was 
mentioned. Relative to the new procedure 
for refunds and allowances it was pointed out 



that follow-up ceases when the refund or 
allowance ends. The general feeling of District 
Officers of C.V.T., however, was the follow- 
up should extend beyond that time. The 
possibility of moving students from Institutes 
to unfilled training-on-the-job opportunities 
was suggested. This did not mean that such 
training should be undertaken after the com- 
pletion of an Institute course. National 
Employment Service expressed interest in 
access to the lists of unfilled training-on-the- 
job opportunities after C.V.T. had made efforts 
to fill them. 

Inter-District Relations. — General satisfac- 
tion was expressed regarding the present 
system of enrolment in Institutes. The 
District Offices, however, suggested that a 
periodic picture of dates when applicants 
might commence training would be welcomed. 
Satisfaction was expressed regarding existing 
facilities for Institute liaison with the Depart- 
ment of Veterans Affairs through counsellors 
in Institutes. 

Miscellaneous. — Some clarification was given 
to the arrangements for training American 
veterans in C.V.T. Schools. The meeting was 
reminded that it was necessary to send pro- 
gress reports to the American Veterans' 
Administration; also that such applicants 
would receive no priority over Canadian 
veterans. 



Unemployment Insurance 



Wage Ceilings for Contributions 



A VIONG the excepted employments listed 
in the first schedule of the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Act, 1940, were those of 
workers in employment "at a rate of remuner- 
ation exceeding in value $2,000 a year . . . ." 

The Act was amended in 1943 and from 
September 1 of that year persons engaged in 
insurable employment have been required to 
make contributions, regardless of the total 
amount of their earnings, where they are paid 
on an hourly, daily, weekly, or piece-rate 
basis. In addition, the "ceiling" was raised 
from $2,000 to $2,400 for other insurable 
workers. 

A further amendment was made in 1946, and 
on October 1, 1946, a regulation became 
effective which set the ceiling for persons paid 
on a weekly basis at $60 a week ($3,120 a year). 

Present Wage Ceilings 

The present wage ceilings are, therefore, as 
follows: (1) There is no ceiling for persons 
paid on an hourly, daily, or piece-rate basis. 

(2) Persons paid on a weekly basis are not 
insurable if they earn $3,120 or more a year. 

(3) Persons paid other than any of the rates 
referred to in (1) and (2) are not insurable, 
if they earn more than $2,400 a year. 

The primary evidence of the contractual 
rate of remuneration is the frequency of 
pay, that is the payroll. If it is claimed that 
the frequency of pay does not reflect the true 
rate, the employer must provide other satis- 
factory evidence. The fact that the remunera- 
tion is expressed as a yearly amount does not 
necessarily mean that the contract is a yearly 
one. 

There has been some difficulty in the past 
three years in regard to persons paid weekly. 
It has been suggested that payment is made 
at weekly intervals for convenience, for 
accounting purposes, etc., and that actually 



some of these persons are not employed on a 
weekly rate of remuneration. Some employers 
in the past have relied on the Common Law 
regarding notice of dismissal or quitting as 
proof that some rate other than weekly was 
in effect, even where the pay intervals were 
weekly. This evidence will not be considered 
adequate in future by the Commission. 

Nature of Primary Evidence Required 

Hereafter, the primary evidence of the rate 
of remuneration will be the frequency of pay; 
where, for example, a person is paid at weekly 
intervals, he will be insurable (if earning less 
than $60 a week) unless specific evidence is pro- 
duced to rebut the presumption that his rate 
of remuneration is a weekly one. For example, 
a regular monthly adjusting entry put through 
the books of account might serve as evidence 
that weekly payments were being converted to 
a monthly rate. However, where payment is 
made bi-weekly, but all the other evidence 
shows clearly that the rate is in reality weekly, 
contributions will be required. 

Option to Continue Insured 

Employees who are no longer insured 
because their earnings have exceeded the 
insurable limit of $2,400, or in the case of 
weekly paid employees, $3,120 or more, have 
the privilege of electing to remain insured 
under the Act where they have to their credit 
not less than 200 weekly contributions within 
the previous five years. Application to remain 
insured should be made individually by those 
concerned on Form UIC 585, copies of which 
are available at the National Employment 
Offices. It should be noted that where per- 
mission is granted for an employee to remain 
insured, the employer has the right to deduct 
not only the employee's share of the contribu- 
tion but the employer's share also. 



69 



70 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



Unemployment Insurance Statistics, November, 1946 

Analysis of Claims for Benefit — Adjudication of Claims — Status of Fund 



REPORTS from the Dominion Bureau of 
Statistics show that claims for Unem- 
ployment Insurance benefit in Canada in- 
creased slightly in November compared with 
October. During November, a total of 37,111 
claims were filed in local offices across Canada, 
as against 34,891 in October and 53,325 in 
November, 1945. Although the number of 
claims has been increasing somewhat from 
month to month since August (as is customary 
during this season of the year) the increases 
have not been large and the claims filed in 
recent months of 1946 have been consistently 
less than in the same months of 1945. 

A total of 36,142 claims was adjudicated 
at Insurance offices during November, 26,976 
being considered entitled to benefit and 9,166 
not entitled to benefit. The chief reasons 
for non-entitlement were: "insufficient contri- 
butions while in insurable employment" (3,160 
cases) "voluntarily left employment without 
just cause" (2,766 cases) and "loss of work 
due to a labour dispute in which the claimant 
was directly interested" (2,146 cases). In 
addition 1,900 persons were considered to 
have refused a suitable offer of employment 
or neglected an opportunity to work, the 
majority of these disqualifications resulting 
from an adjudication subsequent to the 
original adjudication of the claim. 

During November, 61,675 persons received 
one or more benefit payments totalling 
$2,236,541 as compensation for 1,140,539 unem- 
ployed days. This compares with 65,441 
persons paid $2,463,677 for 1,250,308 unem- 
ployed days in October and 61,193 persons 
paid $2,509,610 for 1,244,023 unemployed days 
in November, 1945. 

The average duration of the unemploy- 
ment compensated was, then, 18-5 days in 
November, 19-1 days in October and 20-2 in 
November, 1945. The average amount of 
benefit paid per beneficiary was $36.26 in 
November, $37.65 in October and $40.82 last 
November. The average amount of benefit 
paid per compensated day of unemployment 
was $1.96 in November, $1.97 in October and 
$2.02 in November, 1945. 

Insurance Registrations 

Reports received from the Local Offices of 
the Unemployment Insurance Commission 
showed that as at November 30, 1946, 



2,957,849 employees were issued with insur- 
ance books and had made contributions to 
the Unemployment Insurance Fund at one 
time or another since April 1, 1946 an in- 
crease of 81,895 since October 31, 1946. 

As at November 30, 1946, 177,735 employers 
were registered as having insurable employees 
representing an increase of 1,381 since 
October 31, 1946. (See Table L) 

Unemployment Insurance Fund 

Employer-Employee contributions for 
November reached a new monthly high of 
$7,519,961.44, exceeding the previous record 
figure of October by $934,387.07. This uv 
crease is largely due to the receipt in 
November of a single payment of $873,500 
from the Department of Transport to cover 
contributions in respect of merchant seamen. 
Contributions received during November from 
the Department of Veterans Affairs in respect 
of veterans of the Armed Forces also set a 
new high figure at $921,415.96 for the month. 
For the previous ten months the average 
amount received per month from D.V.A. was 
$319,330.50. Contributions received from the 
Department of Transport and the Depart- 
ment of Veterans Affairs are included in the 
column for "Bulk". (Table 8.) 

Benefit payments during November at 
$2,233,378.21 showed a slight decrease from 
the previous month. 

The net increase to the Fund during 
November was $7,408,788.67. 

Under the Unemployment Insurance Act, 
the Dominion Government pays all costs of 
administering unemployment insurance and 
the National Employment Service, in addi- 
tion to its share of one-fifth of the amount 
of contributions paid into the Fund by 
employers and employees. This means that 
no expenses incurred in the management of 
unemployment insurance are charged to the 
Fund. It is also to be noted that where a 
Dominion Government Department makes a 
contribution as employer, or where it makes 
a special contribution as the Departments of 
Transport and Veterans did in November, the 
Dominion Government also adds the further 
amount of one-fifth of its own initial con- 
tributions, in the same manner as it does 
where the contributions are made by private 
employers and their emploj'ees. 



1947] 



UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 



71 



TABLE l.-REGISTRATIONS OF EMPLOYERS AND INSURED PERSONS 
BY REGIONS, NOVEMBER, 1945 AND NOVEMBER, 1946 



Region 


Employers 

Registered 

November, 

1945 


Insured 

Persons 

Registered 

November, 

1945 


Employers 

Registered 

November, 

1946 


Insured 

Persons 

Registered 

November, 

1946 




12,037 
41,171 
56,142 
27,941 
15,527 


226,670 

905,776 

1,165,425 

415,042 

268,844 


13,577 
46,419 
65,057 
33,584 
19,098 


225,448 




844,250 




1,120,059 




461,268 




306,824 








152,818 


2,981,757 


177,735 


2,957,849 







TABLE 2. 



-NUMBER OF PERSONS FILING CLAIMS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE BENEFIT IN 
LOCAL OFFICES FEBRUARY, 1942 TO NOVEMBER, 1946 



— 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 






4,637 
4,822 
5,046 
3,953 
2,027 
1,772 
1,087 
1,370 
1,013 
1,475 
2,896 
6,562 


11,751 
12,284 
10,667 
6,463 
4,654 
3,226 
3,106 
3,241 
3,715 
6,222 
11,798 
13,770 


20,412 
14,990 
13,307 
8,430 
8,825 
10,857 
10,886 
20,557 
40,473 
36,717 
53,325 
57,612 


71,932 




663 
4,124 
2,925 
2,799 
4,629 
2,668 
1,855 
1,118 
1,058 
1,748 
3,337 


59,098 




50,706 




35,781 




34,777 




30,646 


July 


27,576 




25,115 




28,555 




34,891 




37,111 










Total 


26,924 


36,660 


90,897 


296,391 


436,188 







TABLE 3.— CLAIMS FOR UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE BENEFIT BY PROVINCES, 

NOVEMBER, 1946 



Province 


Claims Filed at 
Insurance Offices 


Disposal of Claims 

(including claims pending from 

previous months) 


Total 


Initial 


Renewal 


Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Not 
Entitled 
to Benefit 


Pending (') 




191 
2,111 
1,103 
9,498 
12,354 
2,069 
952 
1,633 
4,714 


138 
1,294 

771 
6,348 
8,860 
1,344 

614 
1,069 
2,880 


53 

817 

332 

3,150 

3,494 

725 

338 

564 

1,834 


98 
1,674 
. 730 
6,452 
11,249 
1,436 
660 
1,208 
3,469 


28 

2,218 

192 

2,211 

2,755 

407 

227 

215 

913 


120 




1,335 




777 




4,499 




4,351 




1,073 




470 




1,192 




2,683 






Total, Canada, November, 1946 


34,625 
34,891 
47,613 


23,318 
24,510 
39,546 


11,307 
10,381 
8,067 


26,976 
24,404 
33,521 


9,166 
7,185 
7,344 


16,500 


Total, Canada, October, 1946 


15,065 


Total, Canada, November, 1945 


19,060 







0) In accordance with a new procedure, all claims pending, both at local and Insurance offices are shown as pending at the 
Insurance Office. 



79014—6 



72 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



TABLE 4.-CLAIMANTS NOT ENTITLED TO UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE BENEFIT WITH CHIEF 

REASONS FOR NON-ENTITLEMENT 



Reasons for Non-entitlement 



Month 

of 

November, 

1945 



Month 

of 

November, 

1946 



Cumulative 

Total 
for current 
fiscal year 



Insufficient contributions and not in insurable employment 

Not capable of and not available for work 

Loss of work due to a labour dispute 

Refused offer of work and neglected opportunity to work . . 

Discharged for misconduct 

Voluntarily left employment without just cause 

Other reasons ( x ) 

Total 



,304 
81 
713 
36 
587 
,239 
384 



160 
419 
146 
900 
346 
766 
902 



26,238 
1,913 
8,177 
3,881 
2,778 

19,864 
4,724 



7,344 



11,639 



67,575 



0) These include: Claims not made in prescribed manner; claimants not unemployed; 
directions; claimants being in class "O" contributions; claimants being inmates of prisons, etc. 



failure to carry out written 



TABLE 5— NUMBER OF PERSONS RECEIVING UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE BENEFIT, AMOUNT OF 

BENEFIT PAID, NOVEMBER. 1946 



Province 


Number 
Receiving 
Benefit 
During 
Month 


Number 
Commen- 
cing Benefit 
During 
Month 


Number 
of 

Days 
Benefit 

Paid 


Amount 

of Benefit 

Paid 




208 
3,979 
1,461 
18,470 
23,203 
3,416 
1,331 
2,091 
7,516 


65 

1,640 

504 

5,881 

8,215 

1,332 

522 

902 

2,454 


4,474 
79,082 
30,287 
354,374 
411,210 
59,372 
23,905 
39,219 
138,616 


$ 

8,181 




163,480 




63,367 




650,951 




818,279 




116,524 




45,855 




79,271 




290,633 






Total, Canada, November, 1946 


61,675 
65,441 
61,193 


21,515 
20,278 
25,329 


1,140,539 
1,250.308 
1,244,023 


2,236,541 


Total, Canada, October, 1946 


2,463,677 




2,509,610 







1947] 



UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 



73 



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79014— 6£ 



,74 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



Digest of Selected Decisions of the Umpire Under the 
Unemployment Insurance Act, 1940 



THE Unemployment Insurance Commission 
submits the following digest of selected 
decisions in appeals heard by the Umpire under 
the provisions of the Unemployment Insurance 
Act, 1940, and its amendments. These cases 
are an extension of the series commenced in 
the April, 1945, number of the Labour Gazette 
and continued in each of the succeeding issues. 
They are selected on the basis of their possible 
precedent value for the determination of ques- 
tions which may, from time to time, confront 
Insurance Officers and Courts of Referees. In 
addition, they provide a medium for present- 
ing to employers and employees alike brief 
statements of the principles upon which insur- 
ance against unemployment operates in Canada 
and of actual facts in specific cases coming 
before the Umpire on appeal. 

The selected decisions are published in two 
series: (1) Benefit cases, designated CU-B and 
42) Coverage cases, CU-C. 

CASE No. CU.-B 69 
(February 14, 1946) 

Held: — A claimant while in jail, is not incapa- 
citated for work within the meaning of Section 
29 (2) and is not entitled to an extension of 
the two year period for the period of incar- 
ceration. 

The claimant, a single man, 20 years of age, 
was employed at $20.00 per week from Sep- 
tember 1, 1942 until March 13, 1943, when he 
left his employment voluntarily. 

The material facts of the case are as follows : 
'On October 11. 1945, more than two years 
after he left his employment, the claimant 
made an application for benefit. As ISO daily 
contributions had not been paid in respect 
of him while employed in insurable employ- 
ment during the two years immediately pre- 
ceding the date on which he made his claim, 
he applied for an extension of the two-year 
period, under subsection (2) of Section 29 of 



the Act, in order to satisfy the first statutory 
condition. In support of his application he 
alleged that he had been incarcerated in the 
penitentiary from August 23, 1943 until Sep- 
tember 19, 1945. 

The Insurance Officer disallowed the applica- 
tion on the ground that the claimant did not 
prove that he came within the provisions of 
subsection (2) of Section 29. The claimant 
appealed to the Court of Referees from the 
decision of the Insurance Officer and the Court 
unanimously allowed the extension of the 
two-year period. 

From this decision the Insurance Officer 
appealed to the Umpire. 

Decision 

The Umpire's decision was that the claim- 
ant's application for extension of the two-year 
period should not be allowed and gave as his 
reasons : 

Section 29 (2) of the Act provides that if 
an insured person proves that he was, during 
any period falling within the two years speci- 
fied in the first statutory condition, incapaci- 
tated for work by reason of some specific 
disease or bodily or mental disablement, or 
employed in any excepted employment, or 
engaged in business on his own account, then 
the period of two years may be increased by 
such periods of incapacity or of such employ- 
ment or business engagement, but so as not 
to exceed in any case four years. 

It cannot be said that the claimant, while in 
jail, was incapacitated for work by reason of 
some specific disease or some bodily or mental 
disablement, nor that he was employed in any 
excepted employment or engaged in business 
on his own account. The claimant, therefore, 
does not come within any of the provisions of 
subsection (2) of Section 29 of the Act and the 
extension of the two-year period should not 
have been granted. 



Employment, Hours and Earnings 



Summary 



IN November, a steady flow of seasonal 
workers entered the employment market. 
Activity receded considerably in agriculture, 
fishing, transportation and construction. The 
only large-scale expansion offsetting this 
decline was in the logging industry. The high 
wages for woods work was expected to attract 
sufficient manpower to enable the production 
objectives for the season to be reached, thus 
marking the first season since the war started 
that enough woods labour has been obtain- 
able. The high labour turnover, however, 
will continue to be a problem. 

Manufacturing industries were returning to 
normal production, but the problem of filling 
supply shortages had just begun, consequently 
many firms were still unable to regain, pre- 
strike activity. The settlement of the 
American coal strike (see p. 9.) removed a 
threat to Canadian supply lines.' 

The brunt of slackened activity fell most 
heavily on the Prairie and Pacific regions, 
where lack of industrial diversification 
augmented the seasonal fluctuations in employ- 
ment. Thus the winter months will probably 
bring a growing surplus of workers in the 
seasonal Prairie, Pacific and Maritime regions 
while a scarcity of many types of workers 
will persist in the central provinces. 

Unplaced applicants registered at National 
Employment Service offices rose from about 
134,000 at November 1 to stand at slightly 
more than 146,000 at the end of the month. 
Similarly, the number of workers signing the 
live unemployment register increased sharply 
and during the last six working days of 
November totalled 63,760. During the same 
period, positions available declined by almost 
20 per cent to total slightly less than 110,000 
at the end of November. 

Employment in firms having 15 or more 
employees rose markedly during October, with 
all industries reporting gains except the service 
trades. In many cases the rise was contra- 
seasonal, resulting from delayed production 
following the prolonged strike activity during 
September. The index of employment 
(June 1, 1941=100) rose from 116-5 at the 
beginning of October to 119-1 one month 



later. At November 1, employment was 
reported at slightly more than 1,860,000, rep- 
resenting the peak to date for 1945 and 1946. 

Average hourly earnings of hourly-rated 
wage earners in manufacturing increased by 
1-3 cents during October to bring the current 
level to the highest point in the two years 
during which records have been kept. At 
November 1, preliminary estimates reported 
average hourly earnings at 72-7 cents. On 
the other hand, the average hours worked 
per week were reduced practically to stand 
at 42-4 at the beginning of November. 

In the Maritime region, the outlook for the 
winter months was not encouraging. Even 
at peak activity, seasonal employment did not 
greatly lighten the burden of unemployment, 
which had remained relatively the heaviest 
of all regions. With agriculture, fishing, and 
construction activity slowing down, the logging'' 
industry presented the only outlet for" 
expansion. Many farmers and farm workers- 
have found employment in the woods during; 
the winter season. The current shortage of.' 
electrical power seriously affected manufac- 
turing in the region* Employment expansion 
may be expected in the wooden shipbuilding 
yards. Fish-packing plants reported a heavy 
labour turnover. Recent favourable weather 
enabled building construction to progress 
wherever materials and skilled tradesmen were 
available. 

In the Quebec region, the employment- 
outlook in manufacturing industries presented 
some uncertainties as some industries have 
been forced to slow down because of lack of 
orders and materials. Firms dependent on 
steel and its products, however, were gradually 
regaining normal production. There was a 
marked slackening in secondary textile manu- 
facturing due to cancellation of orders. The 
logging industry passed the 25 per cent mark 
of its production objective for the season,. 
The supply of manpower for bushwork 
exceeded all expectations this year. Oppor- 
tunities in mining areas continued to be 
curbed by housing shortages. All construc- 
tion tradesmen, except painters, were fully- 
employed during November. 



75 



76 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



In the Ontario region some of the released 
seasonal workers were absorbed in labour- 
short factories. Production in previously 
strike-bound plants was returning to normal, 
although some plants indirectly affected had 
not yet re-established supply lines or regained 
full production. It was estimated that 
capacity production would not be reached in 
general until early in the new year. Women 
workers were urgently required especially in 
factory towns. The logging industry was 
nearing its employment peak. The supply 
of manpower improved greatly this year 
although additional pulpwood cutters were 
urgently needed to counteract the heavy 
labour turnover. The seasonal recession in 



winter. The first group of Polish veterans 
seeking farm work arrived during the month. 
In manufacturing, some meat-packing plants 
began seasonal lay-offs earlier than usual 
because of small cattle and hog shipments. 
Improvement in the supply of glass eased 
the situation in the larger sash-and-door 
factories. Construction- activity continued 
where weather permitted, and the supply of 
building materials was sufficient. 

The Pacific region reported that the seasonal 
decline had set in sharply during November. 
Fewer employment opportunities were avail- 
able while a steadily increasing number of 
persons were seeking work. Some movement 
of workers to the coastal area from eastern 



SELECTED LABOUR MARKET INDICATORS 



1944 - 1945 - 1946 




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housing and industrial construction began in 
the northern section, but the need for skilled 
construction workers will probably continue 
elsewhere in the region throughout the winter. 
The Prairie region, which is extremely 
sensitive to seasonal fluctuations, reported a 
rising tide of unemployment during November. 
There has been a heavy movement of farm 
workers to the logging camps because of high 
wage incentives, which resulted in a shrinkage 
of openings in woods work. Replacement 
needs and opening of camps which have been 
inaccessible, however, will undoubtedly pro- 
vide employment opportunities throughout the 



points was noticed. The placement of Polish 
veterans in agriculture relieved the shortage 
of dairy workers. Opportunities for woods 
work declined in view of the approaching 
Christmas shut-down although highly-skilled 
men continued to be in great demand. The 
base metal mining industry will not under- 
take any winter expansion in employment. 
Metal manufacturing plants gained activity as 
steel supplies improved, and had started the 
production of new equipment for the lumber 
industry. Construction was hampered both by 
material shortages and adverse weather con- 
ditions during the month. 



1947] 



EMPLOYMENT, HOURS AND EARNINGS 



77 



REGI ON AL UNPLACED APPL I CANTS 

AS REPORTED BY THE 

NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 



THOUSANDS THOUSANDS 



400 


' 







1 i i I I 


350 




CANADA 




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300 


















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78 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS ON EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS 

Note: Figures are as at the first of the month except where otherwise indicated. Latest figures subject to revision. 



Series 



1946 



November October September 



1945 



November October September 



Civilian Non-institutional Population (}) 

Civilian Labour PorceC 1 ) 

Employment- 
Employed C 1 ) 

Index (Junel, 1941 = 100) ( 2 ) 

Total ( 2 ) 

Male( 2 ) 

Female( 2 ) 

Unfilled Vacancies at N.E.S 

Vacancies Notified ( 3 ) 

Applications for Employment ( 3 ) 

Referrais( 3 ) 

Placements( 3 ) ....'. 

Engagements without Referral by N.E.S. ( 3 ) 

Unemployment— 

Unemployed^) 

Unplaced Applicants at N.E.S. 

Total 

Male 

Female 

Unemployment Insurance Claims ( 4 ) 

Unemployment in Trade Unions % 

Earnings and Hours- 
Index, Aggregate Weekly 

Payrolls (Junel, 1941 = 100)(») 

Per Capita Weekly Earnings ( 2 ) $ 

Average Hourly Earnings ( 5 ) i 

Average Hours Worked per Week(&) 

Industrial Production — 

Index (1935-39 = 100) ( 6 ) 



(t) 
(t) 



(t) 

119-1 

1,862,451 

1,455,667 

406, 784 

133,163 

38,285 

40, 606 

28,382 

17,591 

25,856 



(t) 

143,970 

112,278 

31,692 

57,036 

(t) 



154-0 

33-42 

72-7 

42-4 



180-2 



(t) 
ft) 



(t) 

116-5 

1,820,673 

1,416,822 

403,851 

137,817 

40,011 

37,271 

27,881 

17,580 

26,049 



(t) 

142,467 
111,443 
31,024 
57, 682 
1-0 



149-9 

33-23 

71-4 

42-8 



8,792,000 
4,977,000 



4,860,000 

114-9 

1,793,875 

1,398,508 

395,367 

117,236 

42,323 

37,389 

26,298 

16,591 

26,009 



117,000 

144,845 

113,959 

30, 886 

61,822 

(t) 



145-9 

32-81 

70-6 

42-7 



(t) 

112-0 

1,750,215 

(t) 

(t) 

129,365 
41,016 
60,496 
36,907 
28,130 
20,021 



(t) 

156,425 
120,323 
36,102 
61,565 

(t) 



139-2 

32-03 

67-6 

44-9 



184-2 



172-5 



197-7 



(t) 

110-5 

1,724,549 

(t) 

(t) 

153,854 
46,817 
56,576 
40,121 
29.000 
16,996 



(t) 

128,667 
95,576 
33,091 
48,352 
1-4 



137-7 

32-16 

67-8 

44-7 



210- 



(t) 
113-0 
1,764,621 

(t) 

(t) 

162,147 
51,230 
59,178 
40,956 
30,211 
15,071 



(t) 

96,327 
71,170 
25, 157 

28,770 
(t) 



140-6 

32-11 

69-2 

44-1 



223-9 



(t) Not available. 

0) Estimates based on sample Labour Force Survey of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. All figures represent persons 
14 years of age and over. 

( 2 ) Statistics are based on the eight leading industries. Data are compiled from reports of firms with 15 or more employees. 

( 3 ) Weekly average for month in non-agricultural industries reporting to National Employment Service. 

( 4 ) Number of persons signing the Live Unemployment Register during the last six working days of the preceding month. 
( 6 ) Manufacturing only. 

( 6 ) During the month 



Employment and Payrolls at the Beginning of November, 1946 



INACTIVITY in non-agricultural industry 
throughout the Dominion showed a de- 
cidedly upward movement at the beginning of 
November, resulting in part from the settle- 
ment of major industrial disputes which, 
directly and indirectly, had greatly affected 
the situation in recently preceding months. 
The 16,274 establishments co-operating in the 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics' latest monthly 
survey of employment and payrolls reported 
the addition of 38,844 persons to their staffs, 
which aggregated 1,862,451. The increase, 
amounting to 2-1 per cent, was accompanied 
by that of 2-7 per cent in the weekly salaries 
and wages disbursed at November 1 by these 
establishments. 

The expansion at the date under review, 
which was the third successive monthly 
advance, was the greatest in any month since 
July 1, 1942, and was also the largest ever 
reported at November 1. Heightened indus- 
trial activity at that date is contra-seasonal 
according to the experience of pre-war years. 



Beginning with 1939, however, there have 
been annual increases at the first of November. 

Improvement over October 1 was noted at 
the beginning of November, 1946, in manu- 
facturing and in most of the non-manufactur- 
ing industries. As already stated, the 
settlement of several important industrial 
disputes contributed materially to the marked 
gain in manufacturing. Within that group, 
there were substantial increases in the iron and 
steel and rubber divisions, in which the co- 
operating establishments reported the re-em- 
ployment of 12,500 and 4.600 workers, 
respectively, following the termination of 
strikes. The settlement of disputes was also 
a factor in the smaller but nevertheless import- 
ant advances in animal food, textile, chemical 
and electrical apparatus plants. On the other 
hand, lumber mills and vegetable food-pro- 
cessing showed seasonal curtailment. 

Among the non-manufacturing classes, log- 
ging camps reported the employment of some 
13,900 additional workers; this sain was not 



1947] 



EMPLOYMENT, HOURS AND EARNINGS 



79 



equal to those indicated at November 1 in 
either 1945 or 1944. The number added, 
however, exceeded the average at the time 
of year in the experience of the period since 
1920, although the percentage gain was below- 
normal. Mining, communications, transporta- 
tion, building construction and trade showed 
considerable improvement. The services 
division, on the other hand, released employees 
in a seasonal movement. 

Based on the 1926 average as 100, the 
general index number of employment in the 
eight leading industries at the beginning of 
November was 181-9, as compared with 178-1 
at October 1, 1946, and 171-2 at November 1, 
1945. In 1944, 1943 and 1942, the November 1 
indexes had been 183-8, 188-7 and 183-3, 
respectively. With the exception of those 
three figures, the latest index is the highest for 
November in the record of 26 years. As com- 
pared with November 1, 1945, there was an 
increase of 6-3 per cent, accompanied by that 
of 10-5 per cent in the index of payrolls, 
which at the date under review reached a new 
all-time maximum. 

Since the most recent advance was contrary 
to the usual seasonal movement at the time of 
year, there was a considerable advance in the 
seasonally-adjusted index, which rose from 
169-4 at October 1, to 174-1 at the beginning 
of November. 



Payrolls 

The employers whose returns were tabulated 
reported the payment of $62,077,582 in salaries 
and wages at November 1, a sum which 
exceeded by 2-7 per cent their disbursements 
of $60,452,152 at the beginning of October. 
The weekly earnings averaged $33.15 at 
October 1 and $33.33 at November 1, 1946, as 
compared with $31.95 at November 1, 1945. 
At the same date in earlier years for which 
statistics are available, the per capita figures 
were as follows: 1944, $32.29; 1943, $31.60; 1942, 
$29.81 and 1941, $27.02. In the period from 
June 1, 1941, when the monthly record of 
earnings was instituted, to November 1, 1946. 
the average weekly earnings of the typical 
person in recorded employment have risen 
32 per cent. 

If the statistics for financial institutions are 
included, the latest survey of employment 
and payrolls shows that the number of persons 
in recorded employment was 1,939,836, as 
compared with 1,900,891 at the beginning of 
October. The sums received as salaries and 
wages by these persons at November 1 were 
stated as $64,825,827, while the October 1 
aggregate was $63,202,306. The average 
weekly earnings per employee in the nine 
industries, including finance, were $33.42; this 
was 17 cents higher than the per capita figure 
indicated at the beginning of October. At 



EMPLOYMENT IN CANADA AS REPORTED BY EMPLOYERS 

Note. — The curve is based on the number of employees at work on the first day of the month 
as indicated by the firms reporting, in comparison with the average number of employees 
they reported during the calendar year 1926 as 100. 



200 
190 
180 
170 
160 
150 
140 
130 
120 
110 
100 



1940 



1941 



1942 



1943 



1944 



JFMAMJJASOND 

1945 1946 



S80 
!70 
!60 
ISO 
140 
130 
120 
110 
100 



80 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



November 1, 1945, the average in the nine 
leading industrial groups was $32.03, while in 
1944, the November 1 figure was $32.30. 

Table II summarizes the latest statistics 
of employment and payrolls for the leading 
industrial groups, the provinces and economic 
areas, and the 20 leading industrial cities, and 
gives comparisons as at October 1, 1946, and 
November 1, 1945. Table I contains a monthly 
record for the eight leading industries as a 
whole and for manufacturing, showing the 
movements of employment and payrolls in 
the period since 1942. The indexes of pay- 
rolls are based on the amounts disbursed by 
the co-operating firms at June 1, 1941, as 100. 
To facilitate comparisons of the trends of 
employment and payrolls, the index numbers 
of employment in these tables have been 
converted from their original base, 1926=100. 

Table I shows that, in the period for which 
data are available, there has been an increase 
of 19-1 per cent in the number of persons in 
recorded employment in the eight leading 
industrial groups, while the aggregate weekly 
salaries and wages of these persons have risen 
by 53-8 per cent. Including finance, the gain 
in employment from June 1, 1941, to Novem- 
ber 1, 1946, has amounted to 19-5 per cent, 
and that in payrolls, to 54 per cent. The 
reasons previously given for the relatively 
greater rise in the salaries and wages than in 
employment may again be stated: (1) the 
concentration of workers still found in the 
more highly-paid heavy manufacturing indus- 
tries, in spite of the declines which preceded 
and followed the cessation of hostilities; (2) 
the payment of wartime cost-of-living allow- 
ances to the majority of workers; the rates 



at which these allowances were calculated were 
increased on more than one occasion before 
their incorporation in the basic wage rates 
from February 15, 1944; (3) the progressive 
up-grading of employees as they gained experi- 
ence; (4) the granting of higher wage rates 
in numerous cases; and (5) reductions in the 
numbers and proportions of women workers. 
These factors have contributed in varying 
degree to the advances of 32 per cent and 
31-1 per cent in the average weekly earnings 
of the persons reported in the eight and the 
nine leading industries, respectively, in the 
period since the record of payrolls was estab- 
lished at June 1, 1941. 

Another interesting fact which may be 
noted is that notwithstanding the curtailment 
in the production of munitions just before 
and after the cessation of hostilities, and the 
widespread losses occasioned by the recent 
strikes, the index of employment in manu- 
facturing as a whole showed an advance of 
14-2 per cent at November 1, 1946, as com- 
pared with June 1, 1941, accompanied by a 
rise of 46-9 per cent in the reported salaries 
and wages. In the non-manufacturing classes 
taken as a unit, emp^ment increased by 25-5 
per cent from the establishment of the record 
of payrolls to November 1, 1946, while the 
aggregate weekly earnings therein rose by 62-9 
per cent. The decidedly greater gains in the 
non-manufacturing industries generally than 
in manufacturing indicate a situation which 
differs markedly from that which existed 
during the war. 

In regard to the considerable variations in 
the average earnings of workers in the 
different industrial classes, it must again be 



TABLE I.— INDEX NUMBERS OF EMPLOYMENT AND PAYROLLS, BASED ON JUNE 1, 1941 = 100, TOGETHER 

WITH PER CAPITA WEEKLY EARNINGS 

(The latest figures are subject to revision) 





Eight Leading Industries 


Manufacturing 


Date 


Index Numbers of 


Per Capita 
Earnings 


Index Numbers of 


Per Capita 
Earnings 




Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate 
Payrolls 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate 
Payrolls 


Nov. 1, 1943 


123-4 
120-4 
1121 
113-4 

110-2 
109-5 
109-4 
110-6 
110-9 
111-3 
113-7 
113-2 
114-9 
116-6 
119-1 


1520 
151-0 
139-3 
139-5 

127-6 
135-5 
137-3 
139-1 
137-6 
136-6 
141-9 
1431 
145-6 
149-8 
153-8 


31-60 
32-29 
31-95 
31-63 

29-92 
31-97 
32-44 
32-48 
32-05 
31-68 
32-25 
32-64 
32-72 
33-15 
33-33 


137-4 
131-0 
110-9 
109-6 

107-1 
108-8 
108-7 
110-1 
110-8 
109-9 
111-4 
109-5 
111-4 
112-1 
114-2 


172-7 
168-1 
139-3 
136-7 

121-2 
135-4 
135-3 
138-7 
137-1 
134-3 
138-5 
137-5 
140-1 
143-0 
146-9 


32-62 


Nov. 1, 1944 


33-20 


Nov. 1, 1945 


32-64 


Dec. 1, 1945 


32-45 


Jan. 1, 1946 


29-49 


Feb. 1 


32-43 


Mar. 1 


32-43 


Apr. 1 


32-82 


May 1 


32-24 




31-83 


July 1 


32-37 




32-66 


Sept. 1 


32-71 


Oct. 1 


3318 


Nov. 1 


33-48 







1947] 



EMPLOYMENT, HOURS AND EARNINGS 



81 



TABLE II.— EMPLOYMENT AND EARNINGS 

Number of persons Employed at November 1, 1946 by the Co-operating Establishments and Aggregate and Average Weekly 
Earnings of Such Employees, Together with Index Numbers of Employment and Payrolls as at November 1 and October 1, 
1946, with Comparative Figures for November 1, 1945, Based on June 1, 1941 as 100 p.c. 

(The latest figures are subject to revision.) 






Geographical and 
Industrial Unit 



Number of 
Employees 
Reported 
at Nov. 1, 
1946 



Aggregate 
Weekly 
Payrolls 

at Nov 1, 
1946 



Average Weekly 
Earnings at 



Nov 

1,1946 



Oct 

1,1946 



Nov 
1,1945 



Index Numbers of 



Employment 



Nov. Oct. Nov 
1,1946 1,1946 1,1945 



Aggregate 
Weekly Payrolls 



Nov. OctJ Nov. 
1,1946 1,1946 1,1945 



(a) Provinces 

Maritime Provinces 

Prince Edward Island 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British Columbia 

CANADA 

(b) Cities 

Montreal 

Quebec City 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 

Halifax 

Saint John 

Sherbrooke 

Three Rivers 

Kitchener-Waterloo 

London 

Ft. William-Pt. Arthur 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

Calgary 

Edmonton 

Victoria 

(c) Industries 

Manufacturing 

Durable Goods 1 

Non-Durable Goods 

Electric Light and Power 

Logging 

Mining 

Communications 

Transportation 

Construction and Maintenance 

Services , 

Trade 

Eight Leading Industries 

Finance 

Total— Nine Leading Industries 



139,461 

2,879 
81 , 259 
55,323 

564,208 

762,610 

225,189 
103,467 
45,354 
76,368 

170,983 



4,288,377 

82,270 

2,521,143 

1,684,964 

18,217,269 

25,633,327 

7,696,697 
3,516,632 
1,503,732 
2,676,333 

6,241.912 



30-75 
28-58 
31-03 
30-46 

32-29 

33-61 

34-18 
33-99 
33-16 
35-05 

36-51 



30-42 
28-1 
30-40 
30-56 

32-04 

33-40 

34-04 
33-95 
33-06 
34-72 

36-73 



29-65 
27-28 
30-15 
29-00 

30-73 

32-43 

32-55 
32-48 
31-25 
33-41 

35-07 



118 
130-4 
114 
124-5 

119-8 

113 

127-5 
125-7 
126-3 
130-6 

134-5 



115-9 
130-5 
110-5 
124-4 

117-4 

111-0 

125-6 
123-2 
122-8 
130-3 

132- 



1,862,451 



273,495 
25,777 

241,864 
24,000 
51,590 
33,199 
67,815 
76,356 
23,013 
12,804 
9,969 
10,289 
17,784 
24,323 
10,612 
11,366 
7,570 
20,067 
19,732 
13,305 



1,007,503 

452,946 

530,724 

23,833 

87,008 

73,968 

41,226 

173,801 

195,903 

57,013 

226,029 

1,862,451 



,077,582 



9,109,881 

739,557 

8,160,352 

737,027 

1,697,258 

1,228,193 

2,096,031 

2,640,337 

686,729 

379,344 

275,357 

327,913 

527,393 

769,241 

378,642 

338,257 

225,556 

653,847 

609,817 

423,346 



33,734,657 

16,212,888 
16,592,852 
928,917 
2,628,072 
2,968,778 
1,377,067 
7,174,814 
6,376,541 
1,249,332 
6,568,221 

62,077,582 



33-33 



33-31 
28-69 
33-74 
30-71 
32-90 
36-99 
30-91 
34-58 
29-84 
29-63 
27-62 
31-87 
29-66 
31-63 
35-68 
29-76 
29-80 
32-58 
30-90 
31-82 



33-48 
35-79 
31-26 
38-98 
30-20 
40-14 
33-40 
41-28 
32-55 
21-91 
29-06 

33-33 



33-15 



32-84 
28-46 
33-51 
29-30 
32-59 
35-86 
30-77 
34-34 
29-97 
30-02 
28-53 
31-99 
30-84 
31-44 
36-73 
29-90 
30-11 
32-54 
31-06 
31-23 



33-18 
35-43 
31-08 
38-11 
30-54 
40-25 
33-07 
41-54 
32-18 
21-59 
29-03 

33-15 



31-95 



32-20 
29-05 
32-64 
28-55 
32-42 
39-39 
29-77 
33-62 
29-36 
28-39 
26-99 
29-08 
30-33 
30-40 
35-21 
28-06 
27-69 
31-60 
29-49 
31-53 



32-64 
35-60 
29-84 
36-85 
26-22 
38-67 
32-01 
38-60 
30-76 
20-21 
27-27 

31-95 



119-1 



104 
130 
147-1 
130-9 
121-7 
110-4 
124-4 
118-9 
136-3 
75-2 
125-0 
151-8 
126-3 
143-4 
155-3 



114-2 
106-5 
121-1 
124-5 
181-7 
88-5 
157-9 
137-3 
109-7 
131-0 
128-2 

119-1 



116- 



122-7 
106-0 
116-2 
119 

S7 

09 
127 
143 
126 
124 
109-0 
124-3 
100-6 
135-0 

74-6 
120-1 
149-2 
126-1 
134-8 
152-1 



112-1 
103-3 
120-1 
126-4 
152-7 
87-2 
156-3 
134-8 
109-5 
136-5 
125-5 

116-6 



116-9 
114 
115-3 
119-9 

113-7 

105-9 

117-4 
116-6 
114-3 
120-2 

127-9 



112- 



116-9 
115-7 
114-0 
105-6 
104-5 

70-6 
119-6 
146-2 
136-2 
120-6 
102-7 
109-6 
113-9 
116-0 

77-6 
116-7 
136-6 
114-8 
134-5 
158-5 



110-9 
105-9 
115-8 
108-9 
175-0 

81-7 
128-8 
128-9 

94-0 
123-2 
115-9 

112-1 



166-4 
170-2 
157-3 
181 

161-2 

140-8 

164-6 
161-0 
161-3 
171-6 

172-9 



160-9 
167-8 
148-3 
182-3 

156-7 

136-5 

161-3 
157-4 
156-4 
169-6 

171-8 



153- 



160-6 
146-2 
148-7 
159-4 
115-7 
102-6 
158-8 
192-5 
170-5 
166-6 
146-7 
153-3 
154-8 
168-7 
100-2 
160-9 
205-3 
157-2 
181-6 
196-9 



146-9 
135-3 
160-1 



149-5 
275-4 
112-4 
193-8 
173-2 
155-8 
178-2 
158-2 

153-8 



140- 



157-3 
144-0 
144-4 
151-5 
104-1 
95-0 
153-7 
186-8 
164-8 
172-4 
149-5 
153-8 
136-3 
166-1 
102-3 
155-4 
203-9 
156-7 
171-7 
189-2 



143-0 
129-9 
157-8 
148-3 
234-0 
111-0 
189-8 
171-0 
153-7 
183-1 
154-6 

149-8 



77,385 
1,939,836 



2,748,245 
64,825,827 



35-51 
33-42 



35-59 
33-25 



34-14 
32-03 



119-5 



128-3 
117-1 



116-0 
112-3 



158-2 
154-0 



158-3 
150-1 






» This classification comprises the following: — iron and steel, non-ferrous metals, electrical apparatus, lumber, musical 
instruments and clay, glass and stone products. 



82 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



TABLE III.— INDEX NUMBERS OF EMPLOYMENT BY PROVINCES AND ECONOMIC AREAS 

(Average Calendar Year 192G = 100) 
(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



— 


o 

■< 

■< 
O 


J I 


-a 
« J 3 ~ 


a .2 


a 

1 
I 1 


9 

Jo 

V 

a 


o 
"C 

$ 
a 
O 


4 


33 

• s 
1 


1 

a 

a 

02 


s 

3 


2 

11 

to 

mo 


Nov. 1, 1930 


112-9 
103-0 

84-7 
91-3 
100-2 
107-7 
111-0 
125-2 
114-6 
123-6 
139-2 
167-6 
183-3 

188-7 

183-8 

171-2 
173-2 

168-2 
167 2 
167-0 
168-9 
169-3 
169-9 
173-6 
172-8 
175-5 
178-1 
181-9 

100-0 


110-1 
116-6 
86-8 
90-2 
104-9 
111-1 
119-4 
127-3 
112-6 
117-9 
133-8 
179-6 
189-0 

194-1 

187-1 

178-2 
186-7 

169-5 
165-7 
164-4 
168-8 
167-8 
172-9 
176-0 
168-4 
171-9 
176-7 
180-7 

7-5 








111-9 
96-2 
83-6 
92-2 
98-0 
105-0 
110-3 
130-5 
119-7 
131-5 
148-7 
177-1 
198-1 

206-2 

196-7 

178-8 
179-4 

171-8 
170-4 
171-8 
172-5 
170-3 
174-8 
175-4 
177-5 
181-4 
184-7 
188-4 

30-3 


111-6 
98-1 
84-2 
91-4 
103-6 
110-0 
112-8 
130-4 
115-0 
124-4 
142-5 
173-0 
185-2 

187-4 

1S5-9 

170-8 
173-1 

172-2 
173-9 
173-6 
175-5 
176-7 
178-4 
179-6 
174-8 
176-1 
179-0 
183-6 

40-9 


125-8 
128-2 
91-6 
94-6 
96-5 
108-1 
106-0 
106-2 
108-1 
112-7 
119-7 
136-1 
140-2 

148-1 

148-1 

150-6 
153-6 

150-6 
145-7 
145-3 
146-8 
149-1 
153-3 
158-2 
161-0 
162-0 
161-1 
163-6 

12-1 








105-4 


Nov. 1, 1931 . 














98-9 


Nov. 1, 1932 














77-8 


Nov. 1, 1933 














84-0 


Nov 1 1934 














94-1 


Nov 1 1935 














101-8 


Nov 1 1936 














105-4 


Nov. 1, 1937.! 

Nov. 1, 1938 

Nov. 1, 1939 

Nov. 1, 1940 

Nov. 1, 1941 

Nov. 1, 1942 

Nov. 1, 1943 

Nov. 1, 1944 

Nov. 1,1945 

Dec. 1, 1945 

Jan. 1,1946 

Feb. 1 


83-0 
95-0 
101-1 
134-0 
112-8 
108-0 

121-6 

132-3 

123-1 

124-9 

120-4 
122-2 
125-1 
127-5 
133-7 
132-2 
136-0 
142-4 
146-4 
139-8 
139-7 

0-1 


124-9 
123-6 
126-9 
142-4 
198-1 
214-1 

216-3 

204-5 

193-6 
199-5 

176-2 
172-3 
172-1 
173-0 
176-1 
180-4 
184-1 
177-1 
178-4 
185-5 
192-7 

4-4 


132-8 
100-3 
108-1 
123-4 
160-7 
162-6 

170-4 

168-3 

161-8 
174-1 

164-1 
159-9 
157-0 
166-0 
159-2 
165-7 
168-2 
158-8 
165-1 
167-8 
168-0 

3-0 


99-3 
97-6 
103-1 
110-5 
130-1 
138-0 

142-1 

143-9 

145-4 
148-1 

144-3 
140-1 
139-7 
141-5 
142-4 
144-3 
148-4 
150-4 
151-9 
153-6 
156-8 

5-6 


115-9 
132-2 
124-3 
123-5 
134-7 
135-6 

138-8 

141-8 

145-9 
148-5 

143-4 
136-2 
135-7 
136-3 
143-3 
149-4 
153-3 
156-5 
157-0 
156-5 
160-9 

2-4 


110-5 
108-1 
120-0 
131-6 
146-5 
146-6 

163-6 

158-5 

161-7 
165-4 

164-0 
160-4 
160-0 
161-6 
163-0 
169-6 
176-3 
179-9 
180-5 
175-3 
175-6 

4-1 


111-5 
107-5 
115-5 
126-3 
149-4 
187-2 

193-8 

182-5 

172-5 
171-5 

163-7 
159-8 


Mar. 1 


156-4 


April 1 


160-7 


May 1 


163-9 




139-3 


July 1 


162-2 
170-4 


Sept. 1 


176-9 


Oct. 1 


179-3 


Nov. 1 

Relative Weight of 
Employment by 
Provinces and 
Economic Areas 
as at November 1, 
1946 


181-5 
9-2 







Note: — The "Relative Weight", as given just above, shows the proportion of employees in the indicated area, to the total 
number of all employees reported in Canada by the firms making returns at the date under review. 



pointed out that the sex distribution of such 
persons is an important factor, frequently 
associated with variations in the age groups. 
In general, the female workers tend to belong 
to the younger age classes, in which the earn- 
ings are naturally lower than among those of 
greater experience. The matter of short-time 
or overtime may also considerably influence 
the reported aggregates and averages, which 
likewise reflect variations in the extent to 
which casual labour is used; the degree of 
skill generally required of workers in the 
industry is obviously a factor of outstanding 
importance. 

The Sex Distribution of the Persons in Recorded 
Employment 

Employment for men and women workers 
showed expansion at November 1 as compared 
with October 1, but the increase among the 
former sex was on a scale greatly exceeding 
that among women. This situation partly 
resulted from seasonal causes, but was also 
due in part to the termination of the indus- 



trial disputes which had been a factor of 
outstanding importance in recently-preceding 
surveys. The increase in the eight leading 
industries at November 1 amounted to 38,844, 
or 2-1 per cent; of the persons added to the 
reported working forces, 36,562, or over 94 
per cent were men, the women taken on 
numbering less than 2,300. Establishments in 
the nine leading industries showed a gain of 
38,945 employees as compared with October 1 ; 
of these, 36,718 were men, and 2,227 were 
women, there being an increase of 2-5 per 
cent among the former sex, and of 0-5 per 
cent among the latter. The proportions in 
this group of industries were 772 men and 228 
women per 1,000 employees, as compared with 
768 and 232 per 1,000 respectively, a month 
earlier. 

There were important increases as compared 
with October 1, in the number of men reported 
in manufacturing and in logging, mining, 
communications, transportation and trade. 
Among female workers, there was practically 



1947] 



EMPLOYMENT, HOURS AND EARNINGS 



83 



TABLE TV— INDEX NUMBERS OF EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRIES (AVERAGE 1926 = 100) 

(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Industries 


Relative 
Weight 


Nov. 1, 
1946 


Oct. 1, 
1946 


Nov. 1, 
1945 


Nov. 1, 
1943 


Nov. 1, 
1939 




54 1 

2-7 
0-2 
1-8 
1-1 
4-0 
2-2 
0-8 
1-0 
0-04 
3-7 
5-7 
2-5 
1-1 
2-1 
1-0 
7-8 
2-9 
1-1 
0-8 
0-7 
1-3 
2-8 
0-8 
0-6 
0-9 
2-3 
1-0 
1-3 
2-2 
14-8 
1-9 
1-4 
0-8 
5-5 
2-0 
1-3 
0-3 
0-5 
0-5 
2-6 
2-3 
0-9 
0-9 

4 7 

4 

1-4 
1-9 
0-7 

22 

0-4 

1-8 

9 3 

3-1 

. 4-8 
1-4 

10 5 

4-1 
4-3 
2-1 

3 

2-0 
1-0 

12-2 

8-9 
3-3 

100 


191-8 

253-0 
173-6 
159-1 
146-7 
137-7 
115-9 
161-2 
197-1 
38-6 
207-1 
167-6 
151-4 
252-9 
160-3 
150-5 
167-6 
171-0 
107-8 
193-5 
719-6 
159-2 
167-1 
171-6 
126-1 
312-0 
327-8 
164-3 
186-6 
275-4 
203-6 
248-9 
240-3 
168-9 
163-3 
244-8 
479-1 
196-7 
179-6 
223-8 
223-3 
290-1 
208-8 
290-4 

287 6 

156-8 

93-7 

269-4 
200-8 

153 5 

138-3 
156-9 

135 7 

220-9 
112-9 
117-3 

152 5 

170-0 
198-7 
91-1 

225 5 

225-3 
225-8 

201-0 

209-1 
182-0 

181 9 

149 1 

150-2 
245-2 
141-9 

180-3 


188-4 
242-2 
166-8 
157-6 
145-3 
140-1 
120-4 
157-9 
196-9 
38-5 
228-3 
167-3 
153-4 
250-3 
157-8 
113-8 
165-3 
169-0 
107-0 
189-4 
714-1 
157-1 
164-3 
169-7 
124-4 
312-0 
315-6 
160-2 
189-4 
270-1 
194-2 
182-4 
237-8 
166-0 
161-8 
236-0 
475-1 
194-6 
181-1 
215-3 
217-1 
285-2 
212-0 
281-5 

241 7 

154 5 

93-7 

262-6 
197-2 

151 9 

137-7 
155-0 

133 2 

219-0 
110-5 
114-2 

152 2 

165-6 

201-8 

91-7 

235-1 

238-4 

228-7 

196 8 

204-0 
180-0 

178 1 

148 9 

150-3 
245-8 
141-3 

176-7 


186-3 

243-4 
147-9 
146-1 
134-8 
125-5 
104-6 
139-3 
190-5 
32-5 
182-8 
150-0 
133-9 
232-1 
143-6 
176-1 
161-5 
161-1 
110-2 
173-6 
632-0 
153-0 
164-7 
165-7 
131-3 
292-6 
354-6 
150-1 
163-2 
267-3 
208-6 
225-2 
217-6 
149-6 
154-4 
168-5 
836-7 
183-0 
224-5 
197-2 
229-0 
293-4 
215-7 
295-2 

277-1 

144 7 

90-9 
246-9 
169-9 

125 2 

138-6 
121-1 

127 4 

200-9 
109-9 
106-6 

130-7 

134-4 
162-4 
98-3 

210-5 

206-9 
217-4 

181 7 

188-6 
165-0 

171 2 

134 7 

137-4 
200-5 
127-2 

169 4 


230 8 

202-3 
124-8 
136-7 
123-6 
120-7 

98-4 
108-1 
216-6 

51-5 
170-3 
135-0 
122-0 
210-4 
127-2 
135-7 
156-6 
156-7 
112-8 
169-5 
561-7 
144-0 
158-2 
171-1 
133-1 
238-4 
626-5 
137-6 
145-0 
328-0 
351-1 
266-1 
239-0 
128-5 
303-4 
298-4 
1654-5 
168-5 
310-1 
275-6 
432-5 
502-9 
213-0 
372-9 

182 6 

155-4 

97-5 
283-8 
154-0 

105 3 

130-3 
98-4 

119 4 

176-2 
105-3 
107-4 

135-3 

140-8 
173-0 
94-9 

200 4 

202-5 
196-8 

162 2 

171-3 
138-9 

188-7 

125 4 

129-7 
125-4 
119-5 

185 6 


122 1 




149-0 




114-3 




123-1 




121-6 




88-2 




76-0 




90-8 




126-0 




58-4 




146-6 




113-9 




102-3 




146-7 




117-6 




115-6 




134-0 




144-1 




109-5 




156-6 


Artificial silk and silk goods 


478-8 
136-9 


Garments and personal furnishings 


126-0 
123-3 




98-8 




181-3 




177-2 




99-4 




143-6 




138-8 




107-6 


Crude, rolled and forged products 

Machinery (other than vehicles) 


151-7 
123-4 
60-1 




94-8 




139-9 




62-4 




142-7 


Iron and steel fabrication (n.e.s.) 

Foundry and machine shop products. . . . 


131-6 
124-4 
119-9 




166-3 




168-5 


Miscellaneous 


152-3 


Logging 


206-4 


Mining 


171 


Coal 


94-4 


Metallic ores 


353-6 




143-7 


Communications 


86-7 


Telegraphs 


100-0 


Telephones 


83-0 


Transportation 


90-6 




133-5 




79-2 




86-1 


Construction and Maintenance 


117 6 


Building 


85-1 


Highwav 


209-1 


Railway 


64-5 


Services 


135 2 




129-9 


Personal (chiefly laundries) 


145-9 


Trade 


140-2 


Retail 


144-8 


Wholesale 


128-1 


Eight Leading Industries 


123-6 


Finance 






















Nine Leading Industries. . . 













1 The relative weight shows the proportion of employees reported in the indicated industry to the total number of employe 
reported in Canada by the firms making returns at the date under review. 



84 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



no general change in employment in manu- 
facturing. Seasonal activity in logging and 
trade provided work for larger numbers of 
women, while there was a small increase in 
communications. The numbers of women 
reported in construction and finance were 
almost the same as at October 1, but services 
showed decided seasonal curtailment in 
employment for women. 

Information for November 1 of earlier 
years is not available. The trend in the 
employment of women between October 1 and 
November 1 is no doubt retrogressive, so that 
the seasonal factor invalidates a comparison 



of the latest figures with those obtained in 
the periodical surveys of sex distribution which 
were made at October 1 in 1945 and preceding 
years since 1941. It is nevertheless interesting 
to note that since October 1, 1945, there has 
been an increase of some 155,800 men in the 
number in recorded employment, but a 
decline of approximately 12,450 women. The 
ratios per 1,000 persons in recorded employ- 
ment had then been 747 in the case of men 
and 253 in the case of women. 

The employment of women had reached its 
highest point at October 1, 1944, when such 
workers had constituted 261 per 1,000 persons 



TABLE V— THE SEX DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS IN RECORDED EMPLOYMENT IN THE PROV- 
INCES, THE LEADING INDUSTRIAL CITIES, AND THE NINE MAJOR INDUSTRIAL 
GROUPS, AS AT APRIL 1 TO NOVEMBER 1, 1946 



Geographical and Industrial Unit 




Nov. 1 


1946 2 




Oct. 1 


, 1946 


Sept. 


1, 1946 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


(a) Provinces 


No. 

122,190 

2,412 

72,204 

47,574 

447,511 

599,857 

185,664 

82, 700 

38.289 

64,675 

141,770 


No. 

21,419 

782 

11,325 

9,312 

137,972 

198,438 

50, 603 

25,766 

9,895 

14,942 

34,412 


P.C. 

85-1 
75-5 
86-4 
83-6 
76-4 
75-1 
78-6 
76-2 
79-5 
81-2 
80-5 


P.C. 

14-9 
24-5 
13-6 
16-4 

23-6 
24-9 
21-4 
23-8 
20-5 
18-8 
19-5 


P.C. 

85-0 
75-2 
86-3 
83-9 
76-2 
74-5 
78-7 
76-8 
79-6 
80-7 
80-0 


P.C. 

150 
24-8 
13-7 
16-1 
23-8 
25-5 
21-3 
23-2 
20-4 
19-3 
200 


P.C. 

84-8 
75-3 
86-1 
83-7 
76-3 
74-9 
78-7 
76-8 
79-7 
80-7 
79-8 


P.C. 
15-2 




24-7 




13-9 




16-3 




23-7 




25- 1 




21-3 




23-2 




20-3 




19-3 




20-2 






Canada 


1,496,992 


442,844 


77-2 


22-8 


76 8 


23 2 


770 


230 






(b) Cities 


200,442 

19,256 

170,032 

17,976 

38,069 

28,426 

49, 159 

57,923 

16,766 

9,182 

6,308 

7,792 

12,255 

16,686 

9,011 

6,794 

5,552 

15,171 

13,748 

9,935 

768, 877 

401,350 

346,260 

21,267 

85,517 

72.342 

18,692 

162,459 

192,443 

25,792 

129,545 

1,455,667 


89,160 
7,778 

89,239 
9,706 

14,827 
5,435 

22,628 

21,739 
6,247 
3,622 
3,661 
2,497 
5,529 
7, 637 
1,601 
4,572 
2,018 
4,896 
5,984 
3,370 

238, 626 

51,596 

184,464 

2,566 

1,491 

1,626 

22,534 

11,342 

3,460 

31,221 

96,484 

406,784 


69-2 
71-2 
65-6 
64-9 
72-0 
83-9 
68-5 
72-7 
72-9 
71-7 
63-3 
75-7 
68-9 
68-6 
84-9 
59-8 
73-3 
75-6 
69-7 
74-7 

76-3 
88-6 
65-2 
89-2 
98-3 
97-8 
45-3 
93-5 
98-2 
45-2 
57-:! 
78-2 


30-8 
28-8 
34-4 
351 
28-0 
16-1 
31-5 
27-3 
27-1 
28-3 
36-7 
24-3 
31-1 
31-4 
15-1 
40-2 
26-7 
24-4 
30-3 
25-3 

23-7 

11-4 

34-8 

10-8 

1-7 

2-2 

54-7 

6-5 

1-8 

54-8 

42-7 

21 8 


69-1 
71-1 
65-5 
64-9 
69-5 
83-4 
69-2 
72-1 
72-7 
72-2 
62-5 
75-8 
66-2 
68-5 
85-1 
61-1 
73-6 
75-5 
69-1 
73-9 

75-9 
88-3 
64-9 
89-4 
98-2 
97-6 
45-3 
93-2 
98-2 
45-6 
581 
77-8 


30-9 
28-9 
34-5 
351 
30-5 
16-6 
30-8 
27-9 
27-3 
27-8 
37-5 
24-2 
33-8 
31-5 
14-9 
38-9 
26-4 
24-5 
30-9 
26-1 

24-1 

11-7 

35-1 

10-6 

1-8 

2-4 

54-7 

6-8 

1-8 

54-4 

41-9 

22 2 


700 
71-1 
660 
65-3 
700 
83-5 
69-0 
71-7 
73-1 
70-9 
62-7 
76-6 
66-4 
69-3 
85-0 
61-2 
72-5 
75-7 
69-9 
74-3 

76-4 
88-4 
65-5 
89-6 
98-1 
97-5 
45-6 
930 
98-1 
45-9 
58-0 
780 


300 




28-9 




34-0 




34-7 




300 




16-5 




31-0 




28-3 




26-9 


Saint John 


29-1 




37-3 




23-4 




33-6 




30-7 


Ft. Wiliiam-Pt. Arthur 


150 




38-8 




27-5 




24 3 




30 1 




25-7 


(c) Industries 


23-6 




11-6 




34-5 




10-4 




1-9 




2-5 




54-4 




7-0 




1-9 




54-1 


Trade 


420 


Eight Leading Industries 


22 




41,325 
1,496,992 


36, 060 
442,844 


53-4 
77-2 


46-6 
22-8 


53-3 
76-8 


46-7 
23-2 


53-5 
770 


46-5 


Total— AH Industries 


23 







1 This classification comprises the following:— iron and steel, non-ferrous metals, electrical apparatus, lumber, musical 
instruments and clay, glass and stone products. The non-durable group includes the remaining manufacturing industries with 
the exception of electric light and power. s The November data are subject to revision. 



1947] 



EMPLOYMENT, HOURS AND EARNINGS 



85 



reported in the eight leading industries, and 
271 per 1,000 in the nine major industrial 
divisions. The seasonal influence and the 
completion or the curtailment of war work 
are factors of the greatest importance in the 
declines since indicated in the numbers and 
the ratios of women workers, and these, 



together with the marked expansion in the 
employment of men in the non-manufacturing 
industries which has followed the termination 
of the war, have resulted in smaller propor- 
tions of women workers in recorded employ- 
ment at November 1, 1946, than in any earlier 
survey of sex distribution. 



Hours and Earnings, November 1, 1946 



AN increase in the wage rates of hourly- 
rated wage-earners in manufacturing in- 
dustry is reported by the Dominion Bureau 
of Statistics to have occurred between 
October 1 and November 1, 1946. The rise 
was from 71-4 cents to 72-7 cents. The latter 
figure is the highest that has been attained 
in the two years during which these statistics 
have been recorded. 

During the same period, average hours 
declined from 42-9 per week to 42-4. As a 
result, average weekly earnings rose less than 
did hourly wages, from $30.63 to $30.82. At 
November 1, 1945, average weekly earnings 
had been $30.31; this is only the second 
occasion in the comparatively brief record 
that the weekly average earnings have been 
greater than those indicated 12 months earlier. 
The wages indicated at November 1, 1944, 
had amounted to $32.55, the hours then 
reported having been a good deal longer, 
partly as a result of much overtime. The 
wartime industrial distribution of wage- 
earners had then also been more favourable 
to the higher average in manufacturing as a 
whole. 

Hours Worked. — The hours worked in the 
co-operating factories in the week of Novem- 
ber 1 totalled 31,313,794, as compared with 
30,916,228 in the week of October 1. These 
figures, especially the latter, were affected 
directly and indirectly by industrial disputes 
in certain industries. In the durable manu- 
factured goods division the hours were given 
as 15,127,566, exceeding by 3-1 per cent the 
aggregate reported for in the week of 
October 1. In the light manufactured goods, 
the total was 16,186,228; as compared with 
16,246,292 indicated in the preceding survey, 
there was a loss of 0-4 per cent in the hours 
worked. The decline was partly due to 
seasonal causes, but partly resulted from the 
shortened working week established in a 
number of industries in newly negotiated 
agreements. 

The statistics of average hours worked and 
average hourly earnings in manufacturing in 
the period for which data are available are 
summarized in Table I. 



The hours reported in manufacturing as a 
whole averaged less by half an hour than in 
the week of October 1, the latest mean being 
42-4 hours per week. This was decidedly 
lower than the averages of 44-9 and 46-3 
hours in the week of November 1 in 1945 and 
1944, respectively. In the heavy manufac- 
turing industries, the average hours fell from 
42-8 in the week of October 1 to 42*5 in 
that of November 1, 1946, as compared with 
45-3 at November 1, 1945, and 47-0 at 
November 1, 1944. In the light manufactured 
goods industries, the hours averaged 42-4, 
or rather lower than the mean of 42-9 at 
October 1, 1946; the averages at November 1 
in 1945 and 1944 had been 44-6 and 45-3 
hours, respectively. The lower figures more 
recently indicated partly reflect the influence 
of industrial disputes, but to a greater degree, 
are due to a lessening in the standard hours 
worked per week in many establishments and 
industries. 

Hourly Earnings. — As already stated, the 
increase in the aggregate of weekly wages 
reported at November 1 as having been paid 
to the hourly-rated personnel in the co- 
operating factories amounted to 3-1 per cent, 
the disbursements rising from $22,080,681 in 
the week of October 1, to $22,774,798 in 
the period under review. Manufacturers of 
durable manufactured goods distributed 
$11,981,593, as compared with $11,410,163 at 
October 1. In the non-durable manufactured 
goods industries, the wages totalled $10,793,205, 
as compared with $10,670,518 in the preceding 
period of observation. The increase amounted 
to five per cent in the former group of 
industries, and to 1-1 per cent in the latter. 
The payment of higher wage rates in certain 
industries was partly responsible for the 
advances, to which heightened employment 
also contributed. 

The average of hourly earnings in manu- 
facturing as a whole, standing at 72-7 cents 
at the date under review, was the highest in 
the record of 25 months; the mean at 
October 1, 1946, had been 71-4 cents, and 
those at November 1 in 1945 and 1944, 67-5 
and 70-3 cents, respectively. If the industrial 



86 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



distribution of workers indicated in the 
autumn of 1944 had continued into the post- 
war period the average rate of hourly earnings 
in manufacturing as a whole at November 1, 
1946, would have exceeded 75 cents. 



In the heavy manufactured goods division, 
the average of hourly earnings at November 1, 
1946, was 79-2 cents, as compared with 77-8 
cents at October 1, 74-8 cents at November 1, 
1945, and 77-7 cents at November 1, 1944. 



TABLE 1.— AVERAGE HOURS AND EARNINGS OF HOURLY-RATED WAGE-EARNERS 

IN MANUFACTURING 





Average Hours Worked 


Average Hourly Earnings 


Week Preceding 


All 
Manu- 
factures 


Durable 
Goods 


Non- 
Durable 
Goods 


All 
Manu- 
factures 


Durable 
Goods 


Non- 
Durable 
Goods 


Nov. 1, 1944 


no. 

46-3 
46-3 
39-6 
45-4 
45-8 
43-6 
45-5 
44-3 
44-3 
44-3 
44-1 
44-7 
44-9 
44-8 
38-1 
44-1 
440 
44-4 
430 
420 
42-4 
43-0 
42-7 
42-9 
42-4 


no. 

470 

46-9 
39-7 
46-0 
46-5 
44-2 
46-2 
44-7 
45-0 
44-7 
44-2 
45-0 
45-3 
44-9 
37-5 
44-4 
44-2 
44-6 
43-2 
42-1 
42-8 
43-2 
42-6 
42-8 
42-5 


no. 

45-3 
45-5 
39-5 
44-7 
450 
42-7 
44-5 
43-9 
43-3 
43-7 
440 
44-5 
44-6 
44-6 
38-7 
43-8 
43-9 
44-2 
42-8 
41-9 
421 
42-8 
42-7 
42-9 
42-4 


c. 

70-3 
70-5 
700 
70-1 
70-1 
70-4 
70-5 
70-3 
70-1 
69-5 
69-2 
67-8 
67-5 
67-0 
67-9 
68-1 
67-9 
68-4 
68-9 
69-1 
700 
700 
70-6 
71-4 
72-7 


c. 

77-7 
77-9 
77-1 
77-8 
77-8 
78-0 
78-2 
77-5 
77-0 
76-9 
76-5 
75-4 
74-8 
74-0 
74-7 
75-2 
74-5 
75-1 
75-5 
75-1 
75-7 
75-8 
76-5 
77-8 
79-2 


c. 
60-1 


Dec. 1 


60-4 


Jan. 1,1945 

Feb. 1 


60-9 
60-3 


Mar. 1 

•Apr. 1 


60-3 
60-9 


May 1 


60-9 


June 1 

July 1 


61-4 
61-2 


Aug. 1 

Sept. 1 

Oct. 1 


. 60-7 
60-9 
60-4 


Nov. 1 


60-6 


Dec. 1 

Man. 1, 1946 


60-6 
61-7 


Feb. 1 


61-3 


Mar. 1... 


61-5 


Apr. 1 

♦Mav 1 


61-8 
62-4 




63-3 


July 1 


64-1 




64-4 


Sept. 1 


65-1 


Oct. 1 


65-7 


Nov. 1 


66-7 







* The averages at these dates were affected by loss of working time at the year-end holidays in the case of January 1 and 
by the Easter holidays in the case of April 1, 1945, and May 1, 1946. 

TABLE 2.— AVERAGE WEEKLY SALARIES AND WAGES, AND AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES OF HOURLY 
RATED WAGE-EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING 



Week Preceding 


All Manu- 
factures! 


Durable Manufactured Goods 


Non-Durable 
Manufactured Good 


Average 

Weekly 

Salaries 

and Wages 


Wages 


Average 

Weekly 

Salaries 

and Wages 


Wages 


Average 

Weekly 

Salaries 

and Wages 


Wages 


Nov. 1, 1944 


$33-13 

33-29 
3011 
32-98 
33-50 
32-48 
33-51 
32-81 
32-91 
32-65 
32-51 
32-45 
32-55 
32-32 
29-32 
32-29 
32-29 
32-69 
3210 
31-67 
32-21 
3:2-53 
32-59 
33-06 
33-35 


$32-55 
32-64 
27-72 
31-83 
32-11 
30-69 
32-08 
31-14 
31 05 
30-79 
30-52 
30-31 
30-31 
30-02 
25-87 
30-03 
29-88 
30-37 
29-63 
20-02 
29-68 
3010 
30-15 
30-63 
30-82 


$36-67 
36-83 
32-77 
36-44 
37-04 
35-78 
36-98 
35-76 
36-02 
35-67 
35-58 
35-57 
35-60 
35-20 
31-30 
35-23 
34-90 
35-34 
34-51 
33-79 
34-39 
34-62 
34-65 
35-43 
35-79 


$36-52 
36-54 
30-61 
35-79 
36-18 
34-48 
36-08 
34-64 
34-65 
34-37 
33-81 
33-93 
33-88 
33-23 
28-01 
33-39 
32-93 
33-49 
32-62 
31-62 
32-40 
32-75 
32-59 
33-30 
33-66 


$28-99 
29-23 
27-05 
29-06 
29-46 
28-73 
29-58 
29-48 
29-33 
29-33 
29-60 
29-61 
29-84 
29-83 
27-57 
29-69 
29 -9S 
30-30 
29-89 
29-80 
30-23 
30 -6S 
30-82 
31-08 
31-26 


$27-23 


Dec. 1 


27-48 


Man. 1.1945 


24 06 


Feb. 1 


26-95 


Mar. 1 


27-14 


*Apr. 1 


26-07 


May 1 


27-10 




26-95 


Julv 1 


26-50 




26-53 


Sept. 1 


26-80 


Oct. 1 


26-88 


Nov. 1 


27 03 


Dec. 1 


27 03 


Man. 1, 1946 


23-88 


Feb. 1 


26-85 


Mar. 1 


27 00 


Apr. 1 


27-32 


*Mav 1 


26-67 




26-52 


Julv 1 


26-99 


Aug. 1 


27-56 


Sept. 1 


27 SO 


Oct. 1 


28-19 


Nov. 1 


28-28 







I Exclusive of electric light and power. • See footnote to Table 1. 



1947] 



EMPLOYMENT, HOURS AND EARNINGS 



87 



TABLE 3.— AVERAGE HOURS AND EARNINGS BY INDUSTRY 
(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Industries 



Manufacturing 

*Durable manufactured goods 

Non-durable manufactured goods 

Animal products— edible 

Dairy products 

Meat products 

Leather products 

Leather boots and shoes 

*Lumber products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Containers 

Furniture 

*Musical instruments 

Plant products — edible 

Flour and other milled products 

Fruit and vegetable preserving 

Bread and bakery products 

Chocolate and cocoa products 

Pulp and paper products 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Cotton yarn and cloth 

Woollen yarn and cloth 

Silk and artificial silk goods 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Garments and personal furnishings 

Tobacco 

Beverages 

Distilled and malt liquors 

Chemicals and allied products 

Drugs and medicines , 

*Clay, glass and stone products 

Glass products 

Stone products 

*Electrical apparatus 

Heavy electrical apparatus 

*Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged products 

Primary iron and steel 

Machinery (other than vehicles) 

Agricultural implements 

Land vehicles and aircraft 

Railway rolling stock 

Automobiles and parts 

Aeroplanes and parts 

Steel shipbuilding and repairing 

Iron and steel fabrication n.e.s 

Hardware, tools and cutlery 

Foundry and machine shop products 

Sheet metal work 

♦Non-ferrous metal products 

Preparation of non-ferrous metallic ores . 

Aluminum and its products 

Copper, lead, tin and zinc mfg 

Non-metallic mineral products 

Petroleum and its products 

Miscellaneous manufactured products 



Mining 

Coal 

Metallic ores 

Non-metallic minerals (except coal). 



Local Transportation. 

Building Construction. . 
Highway Construction . 



Services 

Hotels and restaurants 

Personal (chiefly laundries). 



Average 

Hours per Week 

Reported at 



Nov.l 



42 < 
42> 
42- 
42- 
46 • 
41- 
41- 
42- 
43- 
43- 
43- 
43- 
45- 
41- 
45- 
30- 
42- 
41- 
46- 
50- 
42- 
41- 
37- 
40- 
43- 
44. 

42- 
43- 

40- 
37- 
41- 

43- 
42- 
42- 
41- 
44. 

42- 

44- 

41- 

39- 

42- 

41 

42 

44 

40 

40 

43 

36 

44 

44 

42 

44 

43 

42 

43 

43 

44 

42' 

41 

39' 

42 



Oct. 1 
1946 



43-2 
39-6 
45-3 
45-5 

46-2 
39-6 
37 

43-1 
43-9 
41-6 



no. 

42-9 

42-8 

42-9 

42-5 

47-4 

40-9 

42-1 

42-8 

43-7 

43 

43 

44-1 

47 

42 

46-1 

42 

42 

41-0 

46-1 

50-0 

42 

41 

45-3 

41-0 

44 

44-3 

44-0 

46-7 

42-3 

35-7 

43-1 

44-4 

44-1 

43-5 

42-3 

44-1 

42-5 

45-1 

41-1 

42-4 

42-5 

42-9 

42-9 

450 

41-9 

40-7 

42-8 

37-0 

44-1 

43-6 

42-7 



Nov.l 
1945 



43-7 
40-9 
45-5 
45-3 

46-6 
40-1 
38 2 

42-7 
43-5 
41-2 



no. 

44 

45' 

44' 

46- 

48-9 

45-2 

43 

44-3 

44 

44-1 

45-2 

44. 

46- 

43- 

46- 

41-4 

43 

42-7 

47 

50 

44-5 

42-5 

44-1 

43-2 

47-0 

47-1 

46-9 

47-7 

42-6 

39-5 

44 

45-2 

45-0 

44-9 

42-7 

45-9 

45-4 

46-0 

44-0 

45-0 

45-6 

47-3 

47-4 

47-7 

43-1 

44-4 

45-2 

42-1 

46-1 

45-9 

45-9 

45-6 

45-7 

45-3 

44-8 

45-6 

44-9 

44-6 

44-7 

42-9 

43-1 

44-0 
39-9 
46-4 



47-2 
41 2 
36-2 

43-8 
44-9 
41-7 



Average 

Hourly Earnings 

Reported at 



Nov.l Oct. 1 
1946 1946 



72-7 
79-2 
66-7 
68-2 
62-6 
72-3 
58-2 
55-4 
68-4 
71-8 
65 



59-1 

69-9 

56-1 

57 

52 

79-5 

84-4 

62-1 

81-9 

75-3 

57 

56 

55 

56 

57 

53 

61 

57 

74 

76-5 

71 

62 

71 

71 

75 

73 

77 

83-8 

85-5 

87-0 

77-7 

85-3 



88-1 
92-5 
88-3 
86-0 
81-8 
72-8 
81-4 
72-9 
78-9 
88-9 
79-8 
72-6 
86-3 
95-1 
64-9 

89-3 
98-7 
89-4 
70-9 

77-0 
85 7 
67-2 

48-3 
47-3 
50-4 



71-4 

77-8 

65-7 

66-7 

62-3 

72-2 

57-7 

54 

67 

70-8 

64 

64-1 

58 

58 

68 

55-9 

57 

52-5 

79 

84 

61 

81-3 

72-1 

56 

55-4 

54 

55-7 

55 

53-2 

60-0 

56-3 

71-6 

73-3 

70-4 

58-2 

70-6 

66-4 

76-3 

73-1 

75-7 

82-2 

81-4 

83-6 

75-9 

84-2 

88-9 

88-4 

90-5 

87-3 

84-5 

81-6 

70-9 

80-1 

72-0 

77-5 

89-2 

77-3 

70-6 

85-9 

95-4 

64-7 



Nov.l 
1945 



89-2 
70-5 

76-8 
85 3 
65-8 

48-3 
47-5 



88-3 84 
95-7 94 



Average 
WeeklyWages 



Nov.l Oct. 1 Nov.] 
1946 1946 1945 



30-82 

33 

28 

29-12 

29-05 

30-29 

24-39 

23-32 

29-55 

31-09 

28-53 

27-95 

27-68 

24-59 

31-73 

21-88 

24-34 

21-57 

36-65 

42-20 

26-64 

33-91 

28-16 

23-54 

24-48 

24-69 

23-76 

24-77 

21-68 

23-06 

23-80 

32-07 

32-74 

30-69 

26-04 

31-58 

30-27 

33-81 

30-46 

30-81 

35-36 

35-74 

36-54 

34-58 

34-72 

36-56 

38-15 

34-04 

38-94 

38-53 

35-09 

32-18 

35-08 

30-69 

34-16 

38-94 

35-19 

30-86 

36-07 

37-75 

27-26 

38-58 
39-09 
40-50 
32-26 

35-57 
33 94 
24-86 

20-82 
20-76 
20-97 



30-63 

33-30 

28-19 

28-35 

29-53 

29-53 

24-29 

23-50 

29-58 

30-94 

28-27 

28-27 

28-12 

24-95 

31 

23-93 

24-48 

21-53 

36-74 

42-45 

26-36 

33-74 

32-66 

23-29 

24-71 

24-28 

24-51 

25-97 

22-50 

21-42 

24-27 

31-79 

32-33 

30 

24-56 

31-13 

28-22 

34-41 

30-04 

32-10 

34 

34-92 

35- 

34- 

35-28 

36-18 

37-84 

33-49 

38-50 

36-84 

34-84 

31-69 

35-23 

31-25 

33-95 

39-96 

34-50 

30-29 

35-56 

37-49 

26-72 

38-59 
39-14 
40-59 
31-94 

35-79 
34 21 
25-14 

20-62 
20-66 
20-52 



30-31 

33-88 

27-03 

29-43 

28-85 

30-74 

23-35 

22-37 

27-19 

27-87 

26-40 

26-11 

25-94 

23-82 

29-73 

21-40 

23-27 

20-79 

32-99 

36-55 

25-01 

32-22 

31-62 

22-33 

23-41 

23-46 

23-36 

24-04 

20-49 

21-76 

23-61 

29 

30-33 

30-49 

24-08 

29-74 

28-19 

32-43 

30-93 

32-99 

36-30 

36-42 

37-07 

34-39 

32-15 

38-14 

39-10 

35-79 

39-92 

39-93 

35-62 

31-83 

35-10 

30-67 

32-97 

36-48 

33-32 

31-49 

35-40 

37-07 



37*31 
37-51 

39-39 
30-20 

33-23 
33 66 
22-95 

19-27 
18-68 
20-31 



Wage 
Earners 
Working 

Hours 
Shown in 

Col. 1 



•The industries classed in the durable manufactured industries are indicated by an asterisk. 



88 THE LABOUR GAZETTE [JANUARY 

TABLE 4.— AVERAGE HOURS AND EARNINGS BY PROVINCES AND CITIES 



Average Hours Worked 



Nov. 1, Oct. 1, 
1946 1946 



Nov. 1, 
1945 



Average Hourly Earnings 



Nov. 1, Oct. 1, Nov. 1, 
1946 1946 1945 



Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick. . 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British Columbia 

Montreal 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 



43-6 
45-3 
44-8 
41-0 
42-3 
43-1 
42-1 
40-1 
43-2 
40-2 
40-3 
41-8 
38-9 



42-1 
46-0 
44-9 
41-8 
42-0 
43-6 
41-5 
40-5 
42-5 
40-5 
41-8 
41-6 



45-2 
46-4 
46-8 
44-0 
44-3 
43-6 
44-1 
42-7 
45-6 
42-6 
43-6 
44-0 
42-4 



69-2 
67-3 
67-3 
74-9 
72-8 
72-1 
73-5 
88-3 
71-8 
75-1 
76-1 
72-5 
89-8 



67-3 
66-3 
66-5 
73-0 
72-9 
72-0 
73-0 
87-1 
71-1 
74-1 
72-0 
72-4 
87-4 



69-7 
61-6 
62-6 
69-0 
68-3 
67-4 
69-5 
80-6 
67-6 
70-7 
70-9 
68-2 
82-7 



The latest mean is the highest in the record 
for workers in this category; previously the 
maximum was that of 78-2 cents at May 1, 
1945, when overtime had been a factor of 
considerable weight. 

In the non-durable manufactured goods 
industries, the hourly rate reached a new 
maximum for the record, the November 1 
figure being 66-7 cents, as compared with 65-7 
cents at October 1, 1946, 60-6 cents at Novem- 
ber 1, 1945, and 60-1 cents at November 1, 
1944. 

Average Weekly Wages. — Information on 
man-hours and hourly earnings is not avail- 
able for all classes of wage-earners, but only 
for those workers for whom employers keep 
accurate records of hours worked, being mainly 
those who are paid by the hour; in general, 
this restriction also results in the exclusion of 
salaried personnel. Among the classes of wage- 
earners for whom satisfactory records of hours 
worked are frequently not available are piece- 
workers in some but not all establishments, 
route-drivers, delivery men, etc. It may be 
noted that many firms state that the earnings 
of their wage-earners paid at other than hourly 
rates exceed those of their hourly-rated per- 
sonnel ; this is particularly the case among 
piece-workers. In general, however, the wage- 
earners for whom statistics are given in the 
present bulletin form important proportions 
of the total personnel of the co-operating 
establishments. Thus at November 1, the 
wage-earners for whom data on man-hours and 
hourly earnings were available constituted 75 
per cent of the total number of persons of all 
Categories on the payrolls of the manufac- 
turers 1 furnishing monthly statistics on employ- 
ment and payrolls at the same date; in the 
heavy manufactured goods industries, the 
ratio was 78-5 per cent, and that in the 
light manufactured goods division, 72 per cent. 

The large proportions which the hourly- 
rated wage-earners constitute of the total 



employees of the co-operating establishments 1 
lend interest to the comparisons in Table II, 
which gives the average combined weekly 
salaries and wages reported by the co-operatmg 
manufacturers in the last 25 months, and the 
weekly earnings of hourly-rated wage-earners; 
the latter figures are obtained by multiplying 
the average hourly earnings in the week of 
observation by the average hours worked in 
the same week. At November 1, 1946. the 
weekly salaries-and-wages figure exceeded by 
29 cents that reported at October 1, while 
the weekly earnings of hourly-rated personnel 
rose in the same comparison by 19 cents. In 
the durable manufactured goods industries, the 
co-operating establishments indicated a rise 
of 36 cents in the salaries-and-wages figure, 
and also in the weekly earnings of the hourly- 
rated personnel. In the non-durable manufac- 
tured goods industries, the average weekly 
earnings of the persons on salaries and wages 
increased by 18 cents as compared with 
October 1, while the average sum paid the 
hourly-rated personnel rose by nine cents at 
November 1. 

In the last 12 months, the weekly earnings 
reported for salaried employees and wage- 
earners in manufacturing as a whole have 
advanced by 80 cents, and those of hourly- 
rated wage-earners, by 51 cents. In the heavy 
manufactured goods division, the indicated 
salaries and wages have risen by 19 cents, but 
the weekly wages have fallen by 22 cents. In 
the light manufactured goods industries, on 
the other hand, the combined salaries-and- 
wages figure has increased by $1.42 in 12 
months, while the weekly earnings of hourly- 
rated wage-earners have mounted by $1.25. 

Non-Manufacturing Industries 

In the non-manufacturing industries, smaller 
proportions of the employees are paid by the 



1 That is, of establishments ordinarily employing 15 
persons and over. See the monthly article on Employ- 
ment and Payrolls. 



1947] 



EMPLOYMENT. HOURS AND EARNINGS 



89 



hour, with the result that accurate records of 
the hours worked are frequently lacking; the 
representation in the non-manufacturing indus- 
tries in the monthly statistics of man-hours 
and hourly earnings is therefore smaller than 
that in manufacturing. 

The total of hours worked in mining as a 
whole in the week of November 1 was given 
as 2,740,736, a figure greater by 0-7 per cent 
than that of 2,721,368 reported for the week 
of October 1. There was also an increase in 
the wage-earners indicated, who numbered 
63,453, as compared with 62,260 in the week 
of October 1. The average hours per man 
were rather lower, falling from 43-7 in that 
week, to 43-2 in the week of November 1. 
The average a year earlier had been 44 
hours; the hourly earnings had then been 
given as 84-8 cents, as compared with the 
latest mean of 89-3 cents. The earnings 
in all three branches of the mining division 
were higher at the date under review than 
was the case a month and a year earlier. In 
the coal and the metallic ore groups, the 
hours averaged slightly lower in the latest 
report than in the week of October 1, 1946. 
In local transportation (consisting chiefly of 
street and electric railways), there was a 



decrease in the average hours worked, but the 
average hourly earnings rose slightly as com- 
pared with the preceding period of observa- 
tion; the latest rate was also higher than at 
November 1, 1945. In building construction, 
the average of hours was lower than in the 
week of October 1, but that of earnings, at 
85-7 cents, was the highest in the record, 
being greater by four cents than the mean 
indicated at the same date in 1945. The 
highway construction division also showed 
lowered hours but higher earnings in the week 
of November 1 than was the case a month 
earlier; the hours and the rate of earnings 
slightly exceeded those indicated at Novem- 
ber 1, 1945. There was no general change in 
the average hourly earnings in the service 
division, in which the hours worked were 
slightly higher than at October 1, 1946. On 
the other hand, the hours averaged less than 
at November 1, 1945, when the earnings were 
lower by 4-3 cents than at the same date in 
1946. 

Provinces and Cities 
Statistics of hours and average hourly earn- 
ings in manufacturing in the various provinces 
and in the larger cities are contained in 
Table 4. 



Operations of the National Employment Service 



P LACEMENT activities of the National 
*- Employment Service are summarized in 
the following article under the headings 



Agriculture, 'Non-Agricultural Industry, Exec- 
utive and Professional Offices, Special Place- 
ments, and Veterans. 



Agricultural activity at National Employ- 
ment Service offices experienced its usual sea- 
sonal slackening during November. Demands 
during the month were for permanent help 
which continued to be difficult to obtain. The 
arrival of Polish veterans eased the shortage 



Agriculture 

somewhat, reports from farmers indicating the 



success of the immigration scheme. Average 
weekly placements into agriculture totalled 
400 during November, representing a sharp 
drop from the number reported for October. 



Non-Agricultural Industry 



The stimulated activity of the Christmas 
season cushioned the dropping off in activity 
in the seasonal industries. Expansion of 
employment during the Christmas season was 
expected to draw workers into the employ- 
ment stream who were normally not in the 
labour market. Therefore, while the level of 
employment is boosted by the temporary 
absorption of students and married women, 
many of the unskilled workers released from 
railway maintenance and construction work 
would be unable to obtain employment. During 
November, the employment offices were faced 



with a heavy work load of these seasonal 
workers, many of whom are in the older age 
bracket and unskilled. Referral and place- 
ment activity continued at the October level 
during the month, while the backlog of 
vacancies was steadily depleted. Positions 
available at the end of November were slightly 
over the 100,000 mark with more than one- 
third of these confined to the logging industry. 
Vacancies Notified — A general slump in 
vacancy reporting was noted in all industry 
groups except logging and the Christmas-active 
trades during November. However, the rate 



90 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



JANUARY 



of slackening was less severe than at the 
comparative period in 1945. Currently, the 
most pronounced declines took place in the 
mining, construction, and transportation 
industries. Shrinkage of labour needs in the 
mining industry was largely due to the heavy 
movement of off-season agricultural help to 
the mines during the winter months. Seasonal 
slowdowns because of winter weather accounted 
for the sharp drop in work-orders in the 
construction and transportation industries. The 
shadow cast by the United States coal strike 
together with the approaching holiday season 
lessened labour needs in the manufacturing 
industries. There was an average of 38,285 
vacancies notified per week in non-agricultural 
industries during November. The dropping 
off in employment prospects was entirely con- 
fined to male workers and took place largely 
in the Maritime and Western provinces. 

The accelerated activity of the Christmas 
season resulted in a flood of orders for sales 
clerks and post office help. Employment 
offices reported that these needs were met 
without serious difficulty. The general staff 
expansion undertaken throughout industry 
since the cessation of hostilities has eased the 
pressure of intensified seasonal activity in 



many businesses. Married women, high school 
and college students, and the seasonally un- 
placed provide the main source of temporary 
aid. 

Labour needs in the logging industry- 
reported during November were almost one- 
third greater than during November, 1945. 
Despite these continued heavy labour require- 
ments logging operators reported that the num- 
ber of men available had considerably exceeded 
expectations. Migration of workers to the 
woods was expected to slacken prior to the 
Christmas shut-down but recruiting activity 
would be renewed at the beginning of the 
new year. Employment offices reported that 
the prevailing high-wage scale had made woods 
work considerably more attractive this year 
than previously. 

Vacancies on file dwindled steadily during 
November. With more applicants and fewer 
jobs reported the number of unfilled vacancies 
at the month-end was 19 per cent below that 
of four weeks earlier. 

Applicants Registering — Applications for 
work reached an average of 40,606 a week in 
November as released construction, agricul- 
tural, and transportation workers became 



OPERATIONS of the NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

ON A COMPARATIVE MONTHLY BASIS 



DATA EXCLUDE AGRICULTURE AND REPRESENT WEEKLY AVERAGES FOR EACH MONTH 



THOUSANDS 




1947] 



EMPLOYMENT, HOURS AND EARNINGS 



91 



available. In addition, there was a heavy 
influx of college and high school students 
seeking temporary Christmas work. The level 
is comparable to that attained in January, 
1946, but is approximately one-third below that 
of November, 1945. The brunt of new registra- 
tions fell most heavily on Quebec, British 
Columbia, and the Prairie Provinces. The 
jump in applications was entirely due to 
additional men seeking work while female 
applications indicated a slight downward 
movement. 

At the end of November, the number of 
applicants who had not been referred to 
specific jobs totalled 126,540. The following 
is a break-down of these workers by age group. 

(1) Age group "under 20" represents 12 per 
•cent of the unreferred applicants or approxi- 
mately 15,000 workers. These workers are 
largely unskilled although a considerable 
number are seeking clerical work. Proportion- 
ately, female applicants predominate in this 
group. 



(2) Age group "20-44", comprising 59 per 
cent, or approximately 75,000 workmen, has 
currently been enlarged by the release of 
seasonal workers. Heavy labourers, construc- 
tion help, and metalworkers are presently in 
surplus supply among the men. More than 
two J thirds of the women in the labour market 
are within this age group, with registrations 
largely in the clerical and sales field. 

(3) Age group "45-64", comprises 18 per 
cent of the unreferred, or 23,000 workers. Over 
one-quarter of the men were only qualified for 
light labour jobs while a large proportion of 
the women were seeking service work. 

(4) Age group "over 65", consisted of 13,000 
workers, or 11 per cent of the unreferred. This 
group is confined almost entirely to male 
workers with registrations largely for light 
factory or service work. 

Applications for work during November 
were filed more rapidly than positions could 
be found. Consequently, the number of 
unplaced applicants mounted steadily. At the 



TABLE I.— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND UNPLACED APPLICANTS, BY OCCUPATION AND BY SEX 

AS AT DECEMBER 19, 1946 

(Excluding Agriculture) 



Occupational Group 


Unfilled Vacancies 


Unplaced Applicants 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 




1,518 

2,700 

1,653 

1,684 

8 

36,565 

165 

854 

26,801 

180 

1,214 

2,619 

1,165 

3,567 

8,899 


623 

5,544 
2,737 
8,223 


2,141 

8,244 

4,390 

9,907 

8 

44,662 

165 

7,320 

26,801 

180 

1,214 

2,619 

1,235 

5,128 

20,930 


4,442 

9,197 

4,554 

8,601 

559 

45,071 

825 

647 

3,159 

1,298 

706 

9,387 

8,253 

20,796 

54,605 


656 
9,116 
3,843 
4,884 


5,098 




18,313 




8,397 




13,485 




559 




8,097 


4,947 


50,018 




825 




6,466 


2,252 


2,899 




3,159 








1,298 








706 








9,387 




70 

1,561 

12,031 


567 
2,128 
5,039 


8,820 




22,924 


Unskilled Workers 


59,644 






Total 


53,027 


37,255 


90,282 


127,029 


28,485 


155,514 







TABLE II.— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND UNPLACED APPLICANTS BY MONTH 

(Excluding Agriculture) 



Date 


Unfilled Vacancies 


Unplaced Applicants 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


December 22, 1944 


87, 643 
53,515 
52,717 
43,983 
43,824 
57,706 
66,327 
65,857 
63,913 
66,896 
89,241 
94,550 
78,636 
53,027 


35,776 
26,026 
30,004 
31,907 
34,362 
41,075 
44,980 
48,562 
42,408 
45,569 
46,362 
41,556 
40, 620 
37,255 


123,419 
79,541 
82,721 
75,890 
78,186 
98,781 
111,307 
114,419 
106,321 
112,465 
135,603 
136,106 
119,256 
90,282 


41,460 
150,583 
177,519 
208,822 
214,867 
201,282 
169,956 
147,594 
130,200 
113,052 
111,146 
102,596 
108,898 
127,029 


19,345 
34,691 
42,940 
47,229 
48,348 
46,469 
41,788 
38,261 
35,101 
32,489 
30,829 
31,978 
32,358 
28,485 


60, 805 


December 21, 1945 


185,274 


January 24, 1946 


220, 459 


February 21,1946... 


256,051 


March 21,1946 


263,215 


April 25, 1946 


247,751 


May 23, 1946 


211,744 


June 20, 1946 


185,855 


July 25, 1946 


165,301 


August 22, 1946 


145,541 


September 19, 1946 


141,975 


October 24, 1946 


134,574 


November 21, 1946 


141,256 


December 19, 1946 


155,514 







92 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



end of November, 146,418 persons were un- 
placed, representing a nine per cent increase 
over the number quoted four weeks earlier. 

The labour market, as depicted by vacancies 
and job-seekers available at Employment 
Service offices, changed from a surplus supply 
of jobs to an excess of unplaced workers 
during November. The change-over affected 
the Prairie Provinces most severely, where 
vacancies represented 63 per cent of applica- 



tions as compared with an overall total of 94 
per cent. Similarly, vacancies in the Maritime 
Provinces and British Columbia represented 
less than two-thirds of the number of work 
applications. The lack of industrial diversi- 
fication in these provinces accentuates the 
degree of seasonal fluctuations. 

Referrals — Referrals continued to increase 
during November, due to the large number of 
workers referred to logging camps. Non- 



TABLE III— UNFILLED VACANCIES BY INDUSTRY A.ND BY SEX, AS AT DECEMBER 19, 1946 

(Excluding Agriculture) 



Industry 


Male 


Female 


Total 


I 
A 


Change From 
\ t ovember 21, 1946 


Dsolute 


Percentage 


Logging — 


22,113 

3,675 

389 


11 
4 


22, 124 

3,679 

389 


- 


11,433 

1,813 

31 


—34-1 




—33-0 




— 7-4 








Total 


26,177 


15 


26,192 


- 


13,277 


—33-6 






Mining — 

Coal 


928 

20 

827 
228 
94 
62 
110 
29 


2 


930 

20 
832 
230 

97 

63 
113 

31 


+ 
+ 


119 

19 
149 

61 

107 

7 

122 

27 


-11-4 


Metallic ores — 


—48-7 


Gold 


5 
2 
3 
1 
3 
2 


— 15-2 




+36-1 




—52-5 




+12-5 




—51-9 




-46-6 






Total 


2,298 


18 


2,316 


- 


475 


-170 






Manufacturing — 


759 
1,648 
1,198 
962 
303 
51 
198 
275 
321 
892 
511. 
691 
154 
343 
259 


2,073 

10,510 

264 

1,188 

402 

34 

305 

777 

117 

286 

201 

1,184 

46 

41 

595 


2,832 

12,158 

1,462 

2,150 

705 
85 

503 
1,052 

438 
1,178 

712 
1,875 

200 

384 

854 


- 


1,651 
899 
994 
651 
156 

66 
149 
207 

59 
508 
198 
272 
222 
175 
229 


-36-8 




— 6-9 




-40-5 




-23-3 




-18-1 




—43-7 




-22-9 




-16-5 




—11-9 




-30-1 




-21-8 




-12-7 




-52-6 




—31-3 




-21-2 






Total 


8,565 


18,023 


26.5SS 


- 


6,436 


-19-5 








4,132 


39 


4,171 


- 


4,426 


-51-5 








1,515 


99 


1,614 


- 


893 


-35-6 








680 


696 


1,376 


- 


535 


-28-0 








929 
1,871 


674 
5,542 


1,603 
7,413 


_ 


445 

1,917 


-21-7 


Retail 


-20-6 






Total 


2,800 


6,216 


9,016 


- 


2,362 


-20-8 








1,011 


1,193 


2,204 


+ 


46 


+ 2-1 






Service — 

Public 


2,713 

57 

789 

991 

1,095 


1,239 
3,085 
3,773 
207 
2,496 


3,952 
3,142 
4,562 
1,198 
3,591 


+ 


1,013 
354 
880 

275 
270 


+34-5 




-10-1 




-16-2 




-18-7 




- 70 






Total 


5,645 


10,800 


16,445 


- 


766 


- 4-5 








52, 823 


37,099 


89, 922 


— 


29,124 


-24-5 







1947] 



93 



agricultural referrals averaged 28,382 per week 
during the month. Out of every 100 jobs 
available (the number on file at the beginning 
and those reported during the month) there 
was an average of 40 applicants referred to 
specific jobs. This represented only a slight 
decline over the October ratio. A similar ratio 
of applicants and referrals indicated that 
referrals dropped from 42 to 38 per 100 appli- 
cations during November. These ratios 
indicate that job filling has been progressing 
at practically a constant level but that the 
employment stream is unable to cope with 
the current increase in applications. 

Placements — Placement activity continued at 
the October level as winter expansion in the 
logging industry compensated for slackening 
in activity elsewhere. Average weekly non- 
agricultural placements totalled 17,591 during 
November. The percentage distribution of 
placements by main industry group was as 
follows: manufacturing, 29; service, other than 
public and professional, 16; construction, 15; 
trade, 12; logging, 11. Since the end of the 
war, manufacturing placements have comprised 
a steadily smaller proportion of all placements. 
As compared with the pre-war level, however, 
the percentage of placements in manufacturing 
has more than tripled. Within the manufac- 
turing groups, current gains in placements 
were reported in heavy manufacturing 
industries, offsetting slightly the marked 
declines in food processing and textile plants. 
The distribution by province showed little 
change during November, with Quebec and 
Ontario accounting for 61 per cent of the 
current appointments. The sex distribution, 
however, varied somewhat as a slight rise in 
female hirings counteracted the dropping in 
male placements. 

TABLE IV.— PLACEMENTS EFFECTED BY 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICES 



Year 


Placements 




Regular 


Casual 


Totals 


1936 


217,931 

275,300 

256,134 

242,962 

320,090 

316,168 

809,983 

1,890,408 

1,693,119 

1,445,692 

730,974 


113,519 
114,236 
126, 161 
141,920 
155,016 
191,595 
85,638 
53,618 
46.798 
47,889 
66,587 


331,450 


1937 


389,536 


1938 


382, 295 


1939 


384,882 


1940 


475,106 


1941 :... 


507, 763 


1942 


895,621 


1943 


1,944,026 


1944 


1,739,917 


1945 


1,493,581 


1946 (48 weeks) 


797,561 



Transfer of workers jumped from two to five 
per cent of total placements during November. 
The current rise resulted from the inclusion 
of approximately 800 Quebec woods workers 



who were transferred to United States logging 
camps. Transference of help has been largely 
confined to the primary industries although 
this service of the employment offices has 
increased in the construction field. Over two- 
thirds of the November transfers were in the 
logging industry, with the construction and 
mining industries largely responsible for the 
remainder. 

Nine per cent of all placements during 
November were for seven days duration or 
less. These were largely confined to trade 
and service establishments. Almost 80 per 
cent of the domestic servants placed were on 
a temporary basis. This large proportion is 
due to the growth of "Home-Aide" projects 
throughout the Dominion. Part-time help 
was also employed in food processing plants, 
construction work, and ship-yards. Casual 
placements may be expected to rise as indus- 
trial activity continues to slacken. 

With more workers seeking jobs, a down- 
ward trend has been evident in the number of 
referrals resulting in placements. During 
labour shortage periods the effective referral 
rate is markedly higher than when a "loose" 
labour market prevails. During August, 66 
per cent of referrals resulted in placements, 
whereas in November the percentage fell to 
62. With fewer attractive jobs available and 
more workers obtainable for employers the 
matching of labour supply and demand became 
more difficult. 

Engagements without Referral — Jobs secured 
without the aid of the Employment Service 
showed little change from the October level. 
There were 25,856 engagements without refer- 
ral made in non-agricultural industries during 
the month. The current level is 29 per cent 
higher than that reported one year ago and 
is approximately two-thirds greater than the 
number of placements effected by the Employ- 
ment Service. The pattern of engagements 
without referral generally follows that of 
placements although hiring into manufacturing 
firms is proportionately greater in the former 
group. Some variations, however, were noted 
during the current period. Engagements with- 
out referral gained markedly in the mining 
industry whereas placements fell; in contrast, 
placements of domestics maintained the Octo- 
ber level as engagements in service work sub- 
stantially declined. 

Separations — The release of seasonal workers 
gained momentum during November as con- 
struction work and railway maintenance 
activity contracted due to winter weather 
conditions. The growing separation rate in 
rubber and automobile plants probably indi- 
cates both cut-backs due to the material 
shortages and the return to a normal rate of 



94 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



turnover as employment reaches its pre-strike 
level. Logging camps continue to be hampered 
by a heavy "quit" rate. There was a moder- 
ate reduction in the number of persons leaving 
manufacturing establishments (other than 
those cited), mining camps, and service jobs. 



The decline in available job opportunities 
tends to reduce the voluntary separation rate. 
Non-agricultural separations averaged 29,766 
a week in November. Increases were entirely 
among men while female separations dropped 
sharply. 



Executive and Professional Offices 



The promotion of expansion projects has 
been constantly curbed by the shortage of 
experienced managerial personnel and skilled 
technical help. Despite the fact that this 
situation is general throughout the country, 
there has been a steady exit of this class 
of worker to the United States. Undoubtedly 
much of the migration may be attributed to 
the higher salaries offered across the border. 
However, the need for a systematic collection 
of suitable existing job opportunities in 
Canada has constantly grown. This service is 
one of the main purposes of the Executive 
and Professional offices. These offices main- 
tain a placement service on a regional level 
with many job-orders and vacancies cleared 
on a Dominion-wide basis. Since their inau- 
guration in September, 1945, there have been 
approximately 13,000 vacancies reported and 
22,000 applications for employment received. 



In addition, many visits have been made by 
persons presently employed. Approximately 
4,800 placements have been effected. The 
trend of placements has been chiefly down- 
ward following the high level reached during 
the three-month period directly after V-J Day. 
However, an upturn has been evident since 
the beginning of September. Vacancy report- 
ing moved sharply upward during November, 
bringing the average weekly number of vacan- 
cies notified to 220. Securing of additional 
vacancies of both technical and managerial 
calibre by the Montreal office accounted 
largely for the jump. During November, 276 
persons per week registered for work at execu- 
tive and professional offices. Placements con- 
tinued at the October level, averaging 57 a 
week during the current month. At the end of 
November, 1,576 positions remained unsatisfied 
while the unplaced applicants numbered 1,992. 



Special Placements 



Sixteen offices throughout Canada offer 
specialized services for first-jobbers and those 
physically or mentally handicapped. In addi- 
tion, the Toronto Youth Employment Centre, 
opened May, 1946, has specialized facilities to 
guide youths under 21 into profitable employ- 
ment channels. The success of this work is 
largely dependent upon community co-opera- 
tion. The forming of advisory committees 
under the Unemployment Insurance Act has 
proved an excellent means of co-ordinating 
activities in this field. An all-time high in 



handicap placements was attained during the 
oeriod October 15 to November 14 when 1,452 
disabled persons were placed in jobs. Despite 
this high placement level, the number seeking 
work increased during the period, and at the 
mid-November date the unplaced stood at 
6,585. Lay-offs of older men from construction 
projects and light factory work is currently 
putting a heavy work-load on special place- 
ment officers. Suitable job opportunities for 
those men are almost non-existent during the 
winter months. 



Veterans 



Applications for Employment — The number 
of ex-service personnel applying for work at 
National Employment Service offices remained 
high in November. Of the 45,706 veterans 
making application., 41,250 served in World 
War II, 3,409 in World War I, and the 
remainder in both wars. World War II 
veterans seeking work for the first time con- 
tinued to decrease in number while the number 
of those having received previous appoint- 
ments through the Employment Service rose 
sharply to constitute 60 per cent of the total 
as compared with 54 per cent in October and 
51 in September. This is due to the fact that 



ex-service personnel who took summer jobs 
now are re-appearing in the labour market. 

Placements — In spite of the efforts of 
employment officers to interest and place 
ex-servicemen in alternative positions in cases 
wherever there is no opening in the occupa- 
tion in which they have registered, placements 
dropped 2,700 for the current month to stand 
at 20.219. Of these, 18,446 served in World 
War II and 1,773 in World War I or both 
wars. Twenty-two per cent of all those 
making application during the month and 
those unplaced at the beginning of the month 
were placed as compared with 25 per crnt in 



1947 



EMPLOYMENT, HOURS AND EARNINGS 



95 



REPORT OF NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE OFFICES FOR FOUR WEEKS NOVEMBER 1 TO 

NOVEMBER 28, 1946 





Vacancies 


Applicants 


Office 


Reported 
during 
period 


Unfilled 
end of 
period 


Regis- 
tered 
during 
period 


Referred 

to 
vacancies 


Placed 


Unplaced 
end ot 
period 




Regular 


Casual 


I*rinoe Edward Island 


271 

1.82 
89 

4,372 

27 

40 

194 

68 

105 

1,523 

26 

236 

126 

765 

29 

78 

29 

17 

442 

24 

520 

123 

3,744 

68 
215 
280 
332 
102 
1,315 

45 
990 

89 
171 
137 

41,198 

54 
172 
274 
119 

83 

187 

313 

1,309 

136 

77 

4,054 

681 

85 

65 
310 
322 
270 
172 
148 
432 
3,747 
171 

83 
193 
786 
121 
583 

45 
13,625 

40 

219 

2,350 

47 
2,382 

60 

97 
557 
191 

72 

216 

4 

305 

729 


133 

117 
16 

1,867 

12 

47 

110 

75 

83 

914 

8 

216 

27 

27 

17 

24 

1 

1 

93 

4 

143 

65 

3,185 

119 
235 

96 
296 
139 
1,210 
121 
556 
231 

30 
152 

46,278 

90 
122 
212 

70 

84 

921 

556 

1,147 

107 

43 

2,658 

173 

83 

54 
244 
437 
271 

93 

107 

275 

4,211 

135 

33 

91 
638 
124 
179 

23 
18,397 

68 

345 

1,921 

56 
3,892 
2,608 
766 
347 
251 

45 
131 

33 
320 
387 


871 
547 
324 

7,112 

222 

114 
249 
126 
320 

2,186 
111 
244 
185 

1,009 
170 
142 
158 
97 
828 
121 
381 
449 

4,761 

185 
348 
160 
316 
102 

1,559 
120 

1,657 
127 
68 
119 

39,475 

88 

57 
110 
187 
196 

70 
171 
420 
949 

69 

67 
870 
140 

47 
345 
655 
404 
297 
207 
128 
117 
564 
287 
151 
107 
158 

92 

238 

18,451 

77 

116 

4,392 

72 
409 
139 

49 
573 

87 

89 
450 

61 
426 
922 


426 

251 
175 

4,782 

69 
75 

171 
12 

120 

1,376 

40 

165 

123 
1,378 
59 
87 
35 
18 

525 
39 

377 

113 

2,934 

42 

164 

127 

272 

94 

1,001 

57 

994 

72 

56 

55 

23,781 

38 
37 
75 
97 
86 
6 
8 

226 

943 
79 
25 

711 
35 
36 

154 

242 

307 
86 

114 
53 
90 
75 
87 

155 
73 
58 
82 
48 
12,037 
33 
64 
1,837 
46 

304 
23 
18 

320 
84 
47 

392 
7 

237 

791 


210 

118 

92 

2,926 

31 

18 

90 

14 

114 

767 

45 

93 

102 

743 

42 

60 

24 

10 

273 

23 

398 

79 

1,650 

16 
48 

109 

153 
77 

494 
38 

553 
50 
62 
50 

13,317 

49 

57 

72 

87 

95 

5 

5 

162 

125 

72 

34 

488 

29 

39 

115 

126 

131 

61 

93 

53 

74 

61 

72 

81 

65 

39 

75 

42 

5,696 

16 

57 

870 

32 

308 

20 

15 

156 

67 

33 

360 

8 

118 

580 


6 

6 


1,377 

1,007 
370 








149 


12,263 

382 






2 
24 


194 




232 




364 




1 

13 


803 




2,723 
259 






3 


252 




157 




25 


1 998 




243 




2 


247 




437 






183 




79 


1 966 




553 


Truro . 




156 






1 114 




221 

15 
39 


6,898 

562 
674 








137 




1 


244 




83 




85 


1,661 
707 






80 


2 509 




167 




1 


60 




94 


Q uebec 


728 
5 


35,958 

76 
61 










61 






194 






226 






181 






318 


Chicoutimi 




344 






53 


Cowansville 




35 






44 


Drummondville 




624 






78 


Farnham 




50 






200 


Hull 




1 244 






531 


Jonquiere 




358 






188 


La Malbaie 




112 






139 


Levis 




1 114 






146 


Magog 




85 






65 


Megantic 




114 






38 


Montmagny 




204 


Montreal 


676 
3 


12,547 
100 
92 


Plessisville 


Port Alfred 


Quebec 


15 

1 


7,351 
55 
117 




Rimouski 






302 


Roberval 




59 






383 


Ste. Agathe 




53 






119 


Ste. Therese 




154 






204 


St. Hyacinthe 


1 


313 
204 


St. Jean 



96 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



REPORT OF NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE OFFICES FOR FOUR WEEKS NOVEMBER 1 TO 

NOVEMBER 28, 1946— Continued 





Vacancies 


Applicants 


Office 


Reported 
during 
period 


Unfilled 
end of 
period 


Regis- 
tered 
during 
period 


Referred 

to 
vacancies 


Placed 


Unplaced 
end of 
period 




Regular 


Casual 


Quebec— Concluded 


222 
26 
299 
363 
454 
122 
509 
2,076 
693 
548 

69,404 

1,145 

382 

228 

174 

174 

907 

259 

65 

861 

73 

43 

810 

90 

63 

69 

506 

2,531 

507 

60 

74 

768 

3,374 

44 

75 

1,981 

243 

964 

687 

1,828 

199 

63 

41 

2,564 

63 

85 

53 

986 

544 

611 

46 

280 

638 

2,171 

212 

28 

134 

360 

211 

727 

44 

6,120 

140 

51 

54 

124 

1,130 

259 

381 

1,525 

739 

80 

143 

431 

109 

2,305 

258 

1,148 

20,328 


141 
16 
59 

184 
93 
58 

197 
2,314 

241 

227 

45,500 

286 

176 

115 

179 

103 

426 

74 

32 

426 

20 

33 

168 

61 

33 

33 

357 

2,263 

455 

9 

86 

394 

1,653 

47 

51 

1,845 

173 

281 

645 

1,155 

54 

31 

58 

1,463 

28 

63 

114 

685 

183 

464 

37 

150 

307 

1,103 

196 

53 

50 

510 

112 

356 

8 

1,242 

23 

30 

28 

62 

249 

642 

128 

1,103 

568 

105 

22 

256 

59 

2,489 

269 , 

996 

16,351 1 


312 

89 

664 

571 

605 

288 

1,225 

1,092 

778 

347 

54,471 

86 
285 
361 
192 
112 
547 
331 

769 
126 
166 

1,124 

92 

62 

256 

301 

914 

208 

82 

118 

719 

4,023 
309 
80 
109 
111 
969 
637 
729 
327 
118 
98 

2,302 
240 
137 
148 
774 
677 
680 
72 
365 

1,103 

3,299 
226 
35 
145 
334 
327 
855 
128 

1,402 

233 

84 

99 

131 

1,366 
767 
476 
541 
680 
51 
258 
563 
163 

1,458 
177 

1,402 
11,003 


189 
22 
319 
456 
219 
170 
395 
1,006 
437 
302 

45,699 

73 
260 
338 
154 

98 
492 
281 

36 
795 

95 

34 
836 

82 

59 
111 
300 
674 
179 

65 

86 

679 

4,186 

72 

79 
102 

34 
1,003 
569 
875 
159 

81 

88 
2,510 

75 
108 

90 
644 
603 
640 

88' 

281 

689 

2,227 

253 

32 
111 
211 
205 
929 

48 
1,131 

99 

59 

48 
158 
1,075 
798 
474 
362 
358 

46 

165 

497 

106 

1,280 

152 

1,327 

10,344 


120 
24 
249 
222 
121 
81 
163 
991 
352 
251 

27,673 

225 

214 

118 

122 

80 

301 

202 

32 

489 

75 

16 

554 

59 

40 

78 

381 

757 

117 

40 

61 

415 

1,612 

26 

58 

374 

146 

609 

361 

517 

73 

67 

53 

1,245 

46 

69 

33 

495 

393 

545 

32 

140 

394 

1,053 

150 

32 

81 

159 

137 

511 

41 

1,669 

66 

39 

43 

90 

605 

196 

289 

515 

293 

77 

92 

329 

101 

1,016 

32 

1,305 

5,039 1 




322 




1 


172 




907 




25 


346 


Sorel 


593 


Thetford Mines 




379 




1 


3,319 


Vald'Or 


154 


Valleyfield 




680 






150 


Ontario 


1,868 


45,177 




28 






159 


Belleville 




408 






133 




1 
31 


■ 49 




289 




142 






52 




24 


476 




79 






306 




10 


1,148 




74 






18 






397 






56 


Fort William 


5 


863 


Gait 


96 




16 


56 




73 






349 




247 
3 

2 


4,474 




356 




38 




72 






176 




16 
18 
2 
5 


580 




316 




258 




316 




154 






47 




186 
8 


875 


Midland 


194 




100 






213 






407 




6 

62 
4 
5 


426 




168 




45 


Orillia 


476 
1,698 


Ottawa 




3,550 






98 




1 


19 




101 




3 
15 


276 




83 




520 






89 




1 


911 




283 






53 






109 






129 




27 
9 


1,401 


St. Thomas 


594 
262 


Sault Ste. Marie 




515 




2 
2 


409 




25 




297 




61 


184 




81 




43 


1,099 




149 




34 

801 


701 




6,833 



1947 



EMPLOYMENT, HOURS AND EARNINGS 



97 



REPORT OF NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE OFFICES FOR FOUR WEEKS NOVEMBER 1 TO 

NOVEMBER 28, 1946— Concluded 



Office 



Ontario— Concluded 
Toronto Junction... 

Trenton 

W'alkerton 

Wallaceburg 

Welland 

Weston 

Windsor 

Woodstock 



Manitoba 

Brandon 

Dauphin 

Flin Flon 

Portage la Prairie. 

Selkirk 

The Pas 

Winnipeg 



Saskatchewan 

Estevan 

Moose Jaw 

North Battleford . 

Prince Albert 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

Swift Current 

Wey burn 

Yorkton 



Alberta 

Black Diamond. 

Blairmore 

Calgary 

Drumheller 

Edmonton 

Edson 

Lethbridge 

Medicine Hat.. . 
Red Deer 



British Columbia.. 

Chillivvack 

Courtenay 

Cranbrook 

Dawson Creek 

Duncan 

Fernie 

Kamloops 

Kelowna 

Nanaimo 

Nelson 

New Westminster. 
North Vancouver. 

Pentirton 

Port Alberni 

Prince George 

Prince Rupert 

Princeton 

Trail 

Vancouver 

Vernon . . 

Victoria 

Whitehorse 



Canada. 



Vac 



Reported 
during 
period 



2,03a 
73 
210 
192 
498 
453 

1,216 
362 



Males 

Females. 



8,599 

512 
196 
196 
105 
44 
46 
7,500 

4,523 

173 
538 
128 
647 
1,867 
832 
61 
88 
189 

8,174 

24 
182 

2,147 
178 

4,087 
521 
584 
201 
250 

15,268 

280 

89 

107 

281 

333 

62 

203 

86 

161 

296 

1,060 

164 

116 

280 

832 

61 

84 

426 

8,350 

256 

1,632 

109 

155,553 

109, 773 
45, 780 



Unfilled 
end of 
period 



1,926 

87 

• 159 

69 

245 

292 

236 

260 

4,689 

264 
84 

116 
79 
18 
53 
4,075 

2,118 

73 
199 

84 
594 
449 
335 
51 
03 
270 

3,151 



Applicants 



81 
708 
254 
938 
411 
406 
138 
215 

4,720 

22 

211 

29 

30 

147 

72 

39 

53 

130 

134 

451 

34 

58 

104 

234 

26 

14 

137 

2,115 

52 

547 

81 

111,641 

72,427 
39,214 



Regis- 
tered 
during 
period 



1,130 
222 
86 
394 
648 
600 

4,045 
239 

11,045 

618 
359 
228 
262 
105 
87 
9,386 

9,605 

195 

1,012 

282 

1,095 

3,266 

2,601 

253 

184 

717 



Referred 

to 
vacancies 



1,208 

162 

67 

97 

587 

456 

1,665 

259 

9,105 

535 

327 
217 
161 
65 
26 
7,774 

6,998 

164 

810 
128 
838 
2,618 
1,705 
164 
109 
462 



Placed 



Regular 



11,416 


8,080 


66 


19 


92 


67 


3,633 


2,489 


286 


190 


5,756 


4,264 


205 


177 


739 


477 


392 


194 


247 


203 


23,666 


13,494 


458 


288 


122 


26 


123 


95 


263 


242 


152 


138 


29 


25 


176 


114 


164 


74 


226 


164 


429 


296 


1,955 


1,014 


616 


233 


268 


136 


271 


226 


872 


842 


178 


44 


135 


66 


465 


376 


13, 774 


7,304 


385 


288 


2,478 


1,419 


127 


84 


162,422 


115,299 


121,816 


80, 225 


40, 606 


35,074 



522 

98 

26 

53 

312 

250 

683 

115 

3,520 

285 
149 
132 
63 
64 
17 
2,751 

2,488 

144 

286 

91 

500 

878 

386 

57 

66 



5,226 

19 
118 

1,373 
185 

2,655 
312 
247 
160 
157 

8,347 

258 

40 

93 

303 

122 

25 

147 

57 

112 

257 

603 

140 

75 

117 



57 

396 

3,697 

225 

848 

38 

65,357 

49, 125 
16,232 



Casual 



20 



191 



1,240 

11 
2 



1,219 
605 



25 

1 

23 

391 

152 

2 

11 



696 



274 



407 



1,091 

42 



745 



218 



6,604 



2, 193 
4,411 



Unplaced 
end of 
period 



827 
201 
86 
272 
823 
356 
7,064 
137 

9,358 

441 

239 

59 

353 

67 

95 

8,104 

6,637 

84 

829 

303 

1,058 

1,191 

2,123 

218 

153 

678 

7,800 

99 

38 

3,312 

140 

3,082 

70 

601 

315 

143 

21,157 

291 

143 

60 

42 

93 

13 

84 

150 

201 

289 

1,977 

766 

241 

146 

220 

351 

107 

396 

12,877 

270 

2,313 

127 

146,625 

114,891 
31,734 



98 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



October. In addition to those placed, 4,799 
veterans were referred to specific jobs but 
their placement was still unconfirmed. 

During the period October 15 to Novem- 
ber 14 there were 663 handicapped ex-service- 
men placed and 35 referred to specific jobs. 
While little difficulty is encountered in placing 
amputees, it is difficult to interest employers 
in taking ex-servicemen suffering from organic 
disabilities. At the end of the period, 2,056 
persons were registered as unplaced in this 
group. 

Reinstatements — Reinstatements, which are 
directly dependent on the rate of discharge 
from the armed forces, continued to fall off. 
During the month, 1,727 persons returned to 
their pre-war jobs and 127 had applied for 
reinstatement but had not been accepted. 
Only one per cent of all veterans applying 
for reinstatement have needed assistance to 
straighten out misunderstandings and only 
four prosecutions have been necessary. Since 
August, approximately 169,230 persons have 



been reinstated, representing 25 per cent of 
all discharges during the comparative period. 

Unplaced Applicants — While applications 
for work remained steady during November, 
the number of those unplaced at the end of 
the period rose from 44,854 for October to 
stand at 48,091. Similarly, the percentage of 
those unplaced 15 days or more registered a 
gain and during November as constituted 65 
per cent of the total compared with 62 one 
month earlier. Discharged personnel of World 
War II made up 84 per cent of all unplaced 
veterans while 12 per cent served in World 
War I and the balance in both wars. 

The occupational classification of ex-service- 
men seeking work underwent a change due to 
the current demand for workers to assist in 
the Christmas trade and the tapering off of 
workers in summer industries. At the end of 
November, 34 per cent of the jobless veterans 
were classified as skilled and semi-skilled while 
36 per cent were unskilled. 



Strikes and Lockouts 



Strikes and Lockouts in Canada During December, 1946 



STRIKE activity in Canada continued at a 
low level during December, 1946. The 
time loss declined by more than 10,000 days 
as compared with the previous month and by 
more than 237,000 days as compared with 
December, 1945. Preliminary figures show 10 
strikes in existence during December, 1946, in- 
volving 2,256 workers, with a time loss of 



23,804 man-working days, as compared with 
18 strikes in November, 1946, with 8,166 workers 
involved and a time loss of 33,890 days. In 
December, 1945, there were 13 strikes, involv- 
ing 19,511 workers, with a time loss of 261,619 
days. 

Preliminary figures for 1946 show 205 strikes, 
involving 136,377 workers, with a time loss of 



STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS IN CANADA, JANUARY-DECEMBER, 1945-1940t 





Number of Strikes 
and Lockouts 


Number of Workers 
Involved 


Time 


Loss 


Date 


Com- 
mencing 
During 
Month 


In 
Existence 


Com- 
mencing 
During 
Month 


In 

Existence 


In 

Man- 
Working 
Days 


Per 1. 000 
Available 

Work 
Days 


1946* 
January 


12} 
16 
19 
17 
28 
25 
28 
20 
13 
10 
12 
5 


12 
18 
28 
24 
35 
36 
42 
43 
33 
27 
18 
10 


2,935} 

3,377 

4,137 

4,776 

46,641 

30,354 

27,459 

5,095 

1,662 

6,881 

2,221 

839 


2,935 

3,532 

5,976 

6,907 

47,730 

70,688 

49,752 

42,407 

33,030 

32,919 

8,166 

2,256 


20,593 

12,406 

46,068 

47,116 

564,925 

935, 188 

918,285 

867,252 

657,601 

393,296 

33,890 

23,804 


0-28 


February 


0-17 


VI arch 


0-63 


April 


0-65 


May 


7-80 


June 


12-92 


July 


12-68 


August 


11-96 


September 


9-08 


October 


5-43 


November 


0-47 


December 


0-33 






Cumulative totals 


205 


136,377 


4,520,424 


5-20 


1945 

January 

February ... 


17| 
16 
22 
15 
13 
12 
25 
19 
16 
14 
21 
7 


17 
17 
23 
15 
15 
13 
27 
27 
17 
18 
24 
13 


5,452} 

5,012 

4,770 

4,622 

3,242 

2,773 

11,738 
8,509 

19,635 
6,737 

20,924 
2,654 


5,452 

5,023 

4,800 

4,622 

3,336 

2,926 

11,975 

13,190 

19,819 

25,868 

31,054 

19,511 


31,937 

6,656 

8,709 

23,533 

6,738 

5, 138 

45,497 

41,122 

184,556 

419,242 

422,673 

261,619 


0-44 
0-09 


March 


0-12 


April 


0-32 


May 

hme 


0-09 
0-07 


Julv 


0-62 




0-56 


Seotem ber 


2-52 


October 


5-73 


November 


5-78 


December 


3-58 






Cumulative totals 


197 


96,068 


1,457,420 


1-66 



* Preliminary figures. 

} Strikes unterminated at the end of the previous year are included in these totals. 

t The record of the Department includes lockouts as well as strikes but a lockout, or an industrial condi- 
tion which is undoubtedly a lockout, is not often encountered. In the statistical table, therefore, strikes and 
lockouts are recorded together. A strike or lockout included as such in the records of the Department is a 
cessation of work involving six or more employees and lasting at least one working day. Strikes of less than 
one day's duration and strikes involving les3 than six employees are not included in the published record unless 
ten days or more time loss is caused but a separate record of such strikes is maintained in the Department and 
these figures are given in the annual review. The records include all strikes and lockouts which come to the 
knowledge of the Department and the methods taken to obtain information preclude the probability of 
omissions of strikes of importance. Information as to a strike involving a small number of employees or for 
a short period of time is frequently not received until some time after its commencement. 



99 



100 THE LABOUR GAZETTE [JANUARY 

STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS IN CANADA DURING DECEMBER, 1946(0 



Industry, Occupation 
and Locality 



Number Involved 



Establish- Workers 
ments 



Time Loss 
in Man- 
Working 
Days 



Particulars ( 2 ) 



Strikes and Lockouts in Progress Prior to December, 1946 



Mining — 
Metal miners, 
British Columbia 



Gold and copper miners 
and smelter workers, 
Noranda, P.Q. 

Manufacturing — 

Printing and Publishing — 
Compositors, etc. 

Ottawa, Hamilton, Ont. 
Edmonton, Alta., and 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Miscellaneous Wood Products- 
Wood products 
factory workers, 
Prince Albert, Sask. 

Service — 
Public Administration — 
Ammunition depot 
workers, 
Renous, N.B. 



250 



( 3 )943 



70 



30 



124 



1,000 



20,000 



500 



500 



120 



Commenced July 3; for increased wages, 
reduced hours and other conditions; ter- 
minated December 10; IDI Commissioner; 
compromise. 

Commenced November 22; for a new agree- 
ment providing for increased wages, check- 
off, shift differential, etc; unterminated. 



Commenced May 30 ;in sympathy with strike 
of compositors at Winnipeg, Man., com- 
mencing November 8, 1945; unterminated. 



Commenced November 13; for a new agree- 
ment providing for increased wages and 
reduced hours; terminated December 21; 
conciliation, provincial; compromise. 



Commenced November 7; for the same wage 
rates as paid at Bedford Basin, Halifax; 
terminated December 2; return of workers 
pending reference to an IDI Commissioner; 
indefinite. 



Strikes and Lockouts Commencing During December, 1946 



Fishing and Trapping- 
Fishermen, 
Nova Scotia. 

Manufacturing — 
Textiles, Clothing, etc- 
Textile factory 
workers, 
Cornwall, Ont. 



Construction — 
Buildings and Structures — 
Carpenters and labourers, 
Windsor Mills, P.Q. 

Transportation— 

Electric Railways and Local 
Bus Lines — 

Bus drivers and mechanics, 
Chatham, Ont. 



Miscellaneous — 

Warehousemen and 
truckers, 

Calgary, Alta. 



500 



230 



76 



IS 



( 4 ) 18 



1,000 



230 



300 



99 



Commenced December 30; for a union agree- 
ment providing for increased percentage of 
proceeds of catch; unterminated. 



Commenced December 3; protest against 

proposed operating time, pay for lunch 
periods, etc., in new agreement under 
negotiations; terminated December 4; 
return of workers; in favour of employer. 



Commenced December 10; for increased 
wages; terminated December 14; return of 
workers; in favour of employer. 



Commenced December 



for increased 
overtime, 
);iyraeni ior suituuury holidays and im- 
proved working conditions; unterminated. 



wages, time and one-half for 
payment for statutory hoildaya and i 
nmvnrl workinf conditions: 111 



Commenced December 13; for a union agree- 
ment providing for increased wages, union 
security, etc; terminated December 19; 
return of workers; in favour of employer. 



(0 Preliminary data based where possible on direct reports from parties concerned; in some cases 
incomplete; subject to revision for the annual review. 

( 2 ) In this table the date of commencement is that on which time loss first occurred and the date of 
termination is the last day on which time was lost to an appreciable extent. 

( 3 ) 204 indirectly affected; ( 4 ) 16 indirectly affected. 



1947] 



STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS 



101 



4,520,424 man-working days. In 1945 there 
were 197 strikes, with 96,068 workers involved 
and a time loss of 1,457,420 days. 

Of the 10 strikes recorded for December, 
1946, three were settled in favour of the 
employer, two were compromise settlements 
and one was indefinite in result, work being 
resumed pending final settlement. At the end 
of the month four strikes were recorded as 
unterminated, namely : gold and copper miners 
and smelter workers at Noranda, P.Q., com- 
positors, etc., at Ottawa, Hamilton, Ont., 
Edmonton, Alta., and Vancouver, B.C., fisher- 



men in Nova Scotia, and bus drivers at Chat- 
ham, Ont. 

The record does not include minor strikes 
such as are defined in another paragraph nor 
does it include strikes as to which information 
has been received indicating that employment 
conditions are no longer affected but which the 
unions concerned have not declared terminated. 
A strike of bakery workers at Halifax, N.S., 
which commenced on February 11, 1946, has 
not been declared terminated, and a strike of 
compositors, etc., at Winnipeg, Man., which 
began on November 8, 1945, is sti'll continuing. 



Strikes and Lockouts in Great Britain and Other Countries 



THE latest available information as to 
strikes and lockouts in various countries 
is given in the Labour Gazette from month 
to month, bringing up to date that given in 
the March, 1946, issue in the review Strikes 
and Lockouts in Canada and Other Countries". 
The latter includes a table summarizing the 
principal statistics as to strikes and lockouts 
since 1919 in the various countries for which 
such figures are available. Statistics given in 
the annual review and in this article are taken 
as far as possible from the government publi- 
cations of the various countries concerned. 

Great Britain and Northern Ireland 

The British Ministry of Labour Gazette 
publishes statistics dealing with disputes 
involving stoppages of work and gives some 
details of the more important ones. 

The number of work stoppages beginning in 
October, 1946, was 203, and 22 were still in 
progress from the previous month, making a 
total of 225 during the month. There were 
68,200 workers involved and a time loss of 
285,000 working-days was caused. 



Of the 203 stoppages which began during 
October, 24 arose out of demands for advance 
in wages; 66 over other wage questions; seven 
on questions as to working hours; 26 on 
questions respecting the employment of 
particular classes or persons; 66 on other 
questions respecting working arrangements; 11 
were over questions of trade union principle; 
and three were in support of workers involved 
in other disputes. 

India 

Revised figures for June, 1946, show 157 
work stoppages, involving 169,589 workers with 
a time loss of 872,931 man-days. 

Preliminary statistics for July, 1946, record 
168 work stoppages with 199,259 workers 
involved and a time loss of 997,268 man-days. 

United States 

Preliminary figures for November, 1946, 
show 310 strikes and lockouts beginning in the 
month, in which 450,000 workers were involved. 
The time loss for all strikes and lockouts in 
progress during the month was 4,750,000 man- 
days. Corresponding figures for October, 1946. 
are 450 strikes and lockouts, involving 290,000 
workers, with a time loss of 4,500,000 man-days. 



Prices 



Prices in Canada and United States 



"P RICE control in the United States was dis- 
*- rupted at the end of June, 1946, when the 
wartime powers of the Office of Price Adminis- 
tration were not extended by Congress. The 
final relinquishment of control occurred on 
November 8 when a presidential order officially 
removed ceilings on all items except rents, 
sugar and rice. What has happened to prices 
in the United States since de-control began? 
The record is of concern in Canada for two 
reasons: as an indication of what might have 
happened were our controls non-existent, and 
as an approximate measure of how much more 
we are now having to pay for our large volume 
of imports from the United States (now run- 
ning at an annual rate of approximately 400 
million dollars per year). 

Until June, 1946, Canadian and United 
States prices ran a close parallel. The cost-of- 
living index in Canada rose 24 per cent above 
pre-war, while the United States cost-of-living 
index rose 33 per cent. Foods were up 42 per 
cent here, 46 per cent there; clothing 24 per 
cent here, 57 per cent there; rent 13 per cent 
here, 9 per cent there. In the field of whole- 
sale prices, the Canadian index was 34 per cent 
above 1939, the United States index 46 per 
cent above 1939. 

Since June, 1946, however, United States 
prices have increased rapidly, while Canadian 
prices have only slightly accelerated their 
previous rate of climb. The cost-of-living 
series are as follows: 

June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. 
Canada .. 123-6 125-1 125-6 125-5 126-8 127-1 
U.S.A. .. 133-3 141-2 144-1 145-9 148-4 151-7 

The United States cost-of-living index rose 
14 per cent during the five months June to 
November, while the Canadian index rose only 
3 per cent. Increases from June to November 
among individual groups in the two cost-of- 
living series were as follows: 



Canada United States 

Food +3 p.c. +29 p.c. 

Clothing -f6 p.c. + 7 p.c. 

Rent +1 p.c. _ 

Fuel and Elec. ... +1 p.c. + 4 p. c . 
Homefurnishings 

and Services ... +6 p.c. -f 8 p.c. 

Increases in wholesale price groups from 
June, 1946, to November, 1946, were as follows: 

Canada United 
States 

General Index 2 21 

Farm Products l 19 

Textile Products 19 

Metal and Metal Products 1 4 

Building Materials 4 8 

Chemical and Allied Products . 1 26 

Raw Materials 3 20 

Semi-Manufactured Articles . . 3 21 

Manufactured Products 3 21 

The point of the two comparisons above is 
that while wholesale price groups moved in a 
parallel manner until June, 1946, there has 
been a considerable divergence since that 
date, with United States' prices out-stripping 
their approximate counterparts in the Cana- 
dian scene. Canadian food imports from the 
United States are only a small portion of the 
total imports from this source, so that pressure 
on our own food price ceilings in this par- 
ticular respect is not excessive. But our im- 
ports of manufactured articles, as well as cer- 
tain industrial raw or semi-processed products 
of iron, coal, cotton and petroleum, are very 
large. The increasing cost of these items 
places additional pressure upon our own price 
structure. An indirect pressure is offered by 
the greater disappearance of our own produce 
now in short supply that is sold in the United 
States at high prices rather than in Canada at 
controlled prices. 



102 



PRICES 



103? 



Prices, Retail and Wholesale, in Canada, December, 1946 

Cost of Living, Prices of Staple Articles, and Index Numbers, 
as Reported by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 



THERE was no change in the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics cost-of-living index 
between November 1 and December 2, 1946. 
It remained at 127-1. Lower prices for foods, 
down 0-2 to 146-4 due to decreases in eggs 
and vegetables, were balanced by increases in 
certain other groups. Fuel and light rose 0-6 
to 109-2 supported by gains in western coal 
prices while clothing advanced 0-1 to 131-2 
and house furnishings and services 0-2 to 129-4 
Two groups continued unchanged, miscel- 
laneous items at 114-1 and rentals at 113-4. 
Over the past year there has been an increase 
of 5-8 per cent in the cost-of-living index 
This has largely reflected an average gain of 
9-0 per cent in foods followed by increases of 
8-3 per cent for house furnishings and services 
and 7-1 per cent for clothing. 

Cost of Living in Eight Cities 

On the base August, 1939 = 100 eight regional 
city cost-of-living indexes recorded very small 
changes between November and December, 



1946. Saskatoon and Vancouver went 0-3 
higher to 128-2 and 126-6 respectively. In- 
creases of 0-1 left Halifax at 125-1, Winnipeg 
at 123-2 and Edmonton at 124-8. Declines 
of 0-1 each were noted for Saint John at 125-1, 
Montreal at 129-1 and Toronto at 125-0. 
Changes in food and clothing prices were 
mainly responsible for movements in city 
indexes although housefurnishings and services 
indexes registered occasional fluctuations at 
certain centres. 

Retail Prices 

The accompanying table on retail prices of 
staple foods, coal and rentals (Table IV) is 
prepared each month by the Dominion Bureau 
of Statistics. It shows the prices of these 
commodities in 64 cities across Canada at the 
date under review. 

The prices of the staple food items included 
in the table are all used in the calculation of 
the index of the food group in the official cost- 
of-living index, and give a reasonably complete 

(Continuel on Page 114) 



1 



COST OF LIVING IN CANADA, WAR AND POST-WAR COMPARISON 

BASE: PRICES IN JULY, 1914 AND AUGUST, 1939 - 100 



190 
100 
170 
160 
150 
140 
130 
120 
1 10 
100 
90 


































































\ 










WORLD 


WAR 1914- 


^^^ 
































SLPTEM8IB 1, 1945 
















JULY 1,1914 












x AUGUST 


1, 1939 










TMAMJJASOND 































































^\^ 


POST- WA 


R 1918 


















-^ V 0ECEM3EB I, 1913 












- POST - WAR 


























^SCPTEMSER 1, IS45 

































_^ 









130 

120 





!90 
I 80 
170 
160 
150 
140 
130 
120 
i 10 
100 
90 



79014—8 



104 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



TABLE L-INDEX NUMBERS OF THE COST OF LIVING IN CANADA 
Prices as at the Beginning of each Month 








Adjusted 
to base 

100-0 for 

August 

1939 







n base of average prices in 1935-39 as 100 







Total 


Food 


Rent 


Fuel and 
Light 


Clothing 


Home 
Furnish- 
ings and 
Services 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Retail 
Prices 
Index 
(Com- 
modities 
only)* 


1914 




79-7 
80-7 
87-0 
102-4 
115-6 
126-5 
145-4 
129-9 
120-4 
121-8 
119-9 
120-5 
121-7 
95-6 
96-2 
98-1 
101-2 
102-2 

100-8 
100-8 
103-5 
103-8 
101-5 

103-8 
104-6 
105-6 
107-0 
105-6 

108-3 
108-6 
111-9 
115-5 
115-8 
111-7 

115-4 
115-9 
117-9 
117-8 
117-0 

117-1 
117-6 
118-8 
119-3 
118-4 

119-0 
119-1 
119-0 
118-6 
118-9 

118-6 
118-7 
120-3 
119-7 
119-9 
120-1 
119-5 

119-9 
119-9 
120-1 
120-8 
122-0 
123-6 
125-1 
125-6 
125-5 
126-8 
127-1 
127-1 


92-2 
93-7 
103-9 
134-3 
154-2 
164-8 
189-5 
145-5 
123-3 
133-3 
130-8 
131-5 
134-7 
92-7 
94-6 
97-8 
103-2 
103-8 

99-3 
99-4 
106-3 
104-7 
100-6 

104-5 
104-8 
105-3 
106-1 
105-6 

109-7 
110-1 
116-6 
123-2 
123-8 
116-1 

122-3 

123-7 
130-3 
129-8 
127-2 

127-3 

128-7 
131-8 
132-9 
130-7 

131-5 
131-5 
132-0 
130-8 
131-3 

130-2 
131-0 
135-6 
133-3 
134-0 
134-3 
133-0 

132-8 
132-5 
133-1 
135-1 
137-7 
142-1 
144-2 
144-7 
143-2 
146-5 
146 
146-4 


72-1 
69-8 
70-6 
75-8 
80-0 
87-3 
100-1 
109-4 
114-0 
115-9 
114-5 
117-3 
119-7 
93-1 
940 
96-1 
99-7 
103-1 

103-8 
103-8 
104-4 
104-4 
103-8 

104-4 
104-4 
106-9 
107-7 
106-3 

107-7 
107-7 
109-7 
111-2 
111-2 
109-4 

111-2 
111-2 
111-3 
111-3 
111-3 

111-3 
111-3 
111-5 
111-9 
111-5 

111-9 
111-9 
111-9 
1120 
111-9 

112-0 
112-0 
112-1 
112-3 
112-3 
112-3 
112-1 

112-3 
112-3 
112-3 
112-3 
112-6 
112-6 
112-6 
112-6 
112-6 
113-4 
113-4 
113-4 


75-1 
73-8 
75-4 
83-8 
92-6 
100-7 
120-2 
128-1 
122-7 
116-8 
114-4 
113-2 
112-6 
102-1 
100-9 
101-5 
98-9 
97-7 

99-0 
98-9 
104-4 
105-4 
101-2 

105-5 
105-9 
107-9 
108-0 
107-1 

108-6 
108-9 
110-5 
112-1 
112-7 
110-3 

112-9 
112-9 
112-5 
112-8 
112-8 

112-8 
112-7 
113-4 
113-3 
112-9 

112-7 
113-0 
108-9 
108-7 
110-6 

109-1 
106-7 
106-5 
106-7 
106-6 
107-1 
107-0 

107-1 

107-1 
107-2 
107-2 
107-2 
107-2 
107-2 
107-2 
107-2 
107-3 
108-6 
109-2 


88-3 

96-4 

109-8 

129-1 

151-0 

173-6 

211-9 

172-0 

145-7 

139-1 

135-6 

135-5 

134-8 

97-1 

97-6 

99-3 

101-4 

100-9 

100-1 
99-6 
99-6 
103-3 
100-7 

103-3 
107-8 
109-1 
113-5 
109-2 

113-7 
114-3 
1151 
119-6 
119-9 
116-1 

119-9 
119-8 
120-0 
120-1 
120-0 

120-2 
120-2 
120-5 
121-1 
120-5 

121-1 
121-4 
121-5 
121-6 
121-5 

121-8 
121-8 
122-2 
122-4 
122-5 
122-5 
122-1 

122-6 
122-7 
123-1 
123-2 
123-7 
124-3 
126-4 
127-6 
129-6 
130-2 
131-1 
131-2 


69-6 

70-0 

74-1 

80-7 

90-3 

100-0 

109-3 

111-4 

111-4 

106-1 

105-1 

104-8 

105-0 

97-8 




1915 






1916 






1917 






1918 






1919 






1920 






1921 






1922 






1926 






1927 






1928 






1929 






1934 






1935 




95-4 
97-2 
101-5 
102-4 

100-9 
100-8 
101-0 
104-1 
101-4 

104-3 
106-1 
106-9 
109-7 
107-2 

110-8 
111-7 
113-0 
117-3 
117-9 
113-8 

118-0 
118-1 
117-9 
117-8 
117-9 

117-8 
117-8 
117-8 
118-2 
118-0 

118-4 
118-4 
118-3 
118-4 
118-4 

118-3 
118-5 
119-2 
119-4 
119-4 
119-5 
119-0 

119-5 
120-1 
120-4 
120-7 
1221 
122-4 
125-1 
127-0 
128-4 
128-8 
129-2 
129-4 


98-7 
99-1 
100-1 
101-2 

101-3 
101-3 
101-7 
102-0 
101-4 

101-8 
101-8 
102-2 
102-8 
102-3 

103-1 
102-9 
105-6 
106-5 
106-7 
105-1 

106-8 
107-1 
107-1 
107-1 
107-1 

107-5 
107-7 
108-2 
108-3 
108-0 

108-9 
109-0 
109-0 
108-9 
108-9 

109-2 
109-2 
109-4 
109-6 
109-6 
109-6 
109-4 

110-9 
110-9 
110-9 
111-0 
111-5 
1121 
113-7 
113-8 
113-9 
113-9 
1141 
114-1 


95-9 


1936 




98-1 


1937 




102-0 


1938 




102-8 


1939 


100 
100 
102-7 
103-0 
100-7 

103-0 
103-8 
104 8 
106 2 

104 8 

107-4 
1110 

114 9 

114-5 

115 
1170 

116 9 
11G-1 

116-7 
118 4 

118 1 
118-2 
118 1 

117 7 

118 

117-7 
117-8 

119 3 

118-8 

118 9 

119 1 

118 6 

118-9 
118-9 

119 1 
119-8 

121 

122 6 
124 1 
124 6 
124-5 
125-8 
126-1 
126-1 


100-0 




100-0 


October 2 


103-8 




104-3 


Year 


101-0 


1940 


104-2 




105-5 


July 2 


106-4 




108-4 


Year 


106-6 


1941 


110-4 


Aprill 


110-7 


July 2 


114-9 




120-1 




120-6 


Year 


114-9 


1942 


119-9 




120-6 


July 2 


123-9 




123-7 


Year 


122-4 


1943 


122-5 


Aprill 


123-2 


July 2 


125-1 




125-8 


Year 


124-5 


1944 


125-3 


Aprill 


125-4 


July 3 


125-6 


October 2 


124-9 


Year 


125-2 


1945 


124-6 


April 2 


1251 


July 3 


127-6 




126-5 




126-8 




127-0 


Year 


126-2 


1946 


126-3 




126-2 




126-7 


Aprill 


127-8 


May 1 


129-5 




132-1 




134-4 




135-1 

135-0 




136-9 




137-3 


December 2 


137-2 



t Commodities in the cost-of-living excluding rents and services. 



1947] 



PRICES 



105 



TABLE II— DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS INDEX NUMBERS OF THE COST OF LIVING FOR EIGHT 
CITIES OF CANADA AT THE BEGINNING OF DECEMBER, 1946 

(Base:— August, 1939 = 100) 






— 


Total 


Food 


Rent 


Fuel 


Clothing 


Home 
Furnish- 
ings and 
Services 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Halifax 


125-1 
125-1 
129-1 
125-0 
123-2 
128-2 
124-8 
126-6 


151-3 
143-4 
154-6 
142-4 
144-5 
151-4 
149-6 
147-8 


105-7 
107-8 
108-8 
111-1 

106 
115-1 
105-0 

107 


107-9 
115-7 
109 7 
116-3 
113-6 
117-9 
105-3 
126-0 


132-0 
132-3 
130-8 
132-8 
124-4 
127-5 
131-4 
132-4 


122-0 
121-4 
128-5 
125-6 
123-0 
127-5 
125-5 
126-5 


113-9 




113-7 




111-2 




114-3 




111-9 




112-4 




112-7 




112-4 







TABLE III— INDEX NUMBERS OF STAPLE FOOD ITEMS. 

(Basis: August, 1939=100) 

Dominion Average Retail Price Relations With Dominion Averages of Actual Retail Prices for Latest Month. 



Commodities* 



Per 



Aug. 
1939 



Dec. 
1941 



May 

1945 



Aug. 
1945 



Nov. 
1945 



Feb. 

1946 



May 
1946 



Aug. 
1946 



Oct. 
1946 



Nov. 



Dec. 



Price 
Dec. 
1946 



Beef, sirloin steak 

Beef, round steak 

Beef, rib roast 

Beef, shoulder 

Beef, stewing, boneless 

Veal, front roll, boneless 

Lamb, leg roast 

Pork, fresh loins, centre cut 

Pork, fresh shoulder, hock-off 

Bacon, side, fancy, sliced, rind-on . 

Lard, pure 

Shortening, vegetable 

Eggs, grade ' A", large 

Milk 

Butter, creamery, prints 

Cheese, Canadian, mild 

Bread, white 

Flour, first grade 

Rolled oats, bulk 

Corn Hakes, 8 oz 

Tomatoes, canned, 2J's 

Peas, canned, 2's 

Corn, canned, 2's 

Beans, dry 

Onions 

Potatoes 

Prunes, bulk 

Raisins, seedless, bulk 

Oranges 

Lemons 

Jam, strawberry, 16 oz 

Peaches, 20 oz 

Marmalade, orange, 16 oz 

Corn syrup, 2 lb 

Sugar, granulated 

Sugar, yellow 

Coffee 

Tea, black, J lb 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

doz. 

It 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

lb. 
pkg. 
tin 
tin 
tin 
lb. 

lb. 
151b. 

lb. 

lb. 
doz. 
doz. 

jar 
tin 
jar 
tin 
lb. 
lb. 

lb. 

pkg. 



100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 

100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 

100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 

100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 

100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 

100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 
100-0 

100-0 
100-0 



120' 
125 
125> 
132' 
136- 
139 



109-9 
125-3 
127-0 
132-3 
151-3 
134-7 

156-4 
111-0 
140-5 
174-6 
106-5 
127-3 

112-0 
101-1 
129-9 
117-5 
128-3 
129-4 

108-2 
89-9 
115-8 
104-0 
132-5 
111-3 

111-3 
101-5 
118-3 
138-0 
132-3 
131-3 

141-6 
145-2 



154-1 
167-1 
173-9 
161-0 
168-3 
173-4 

150-4 
142-3 
142-3 
141-2 
157-0 
136-8 

137-2 
95-4 
145-4 
163-9 
106-3 
124-2 

114-0 
100-0 
136-8 
121-7 
132-7 
133-3 

106-1 
143-9 
121-1 
109-3 
151-5 
141-2 

115-1 

104-1 
128-9 
158-2 
132-3 
134-9 

131-4 
131-6 



131-4 
131-6 



154-8 
167-9 
174-3 
162-3 
168-3 
174-6 

153-2 
143-8 
142-9 
142-5 
159-6 
137-5 

180-9 
95-4 
146-9 
164-9 
106-3 
124-2 

114-0 
100-0 
137-7 
121-7 
132-7 
133-3 

126-5 
147-6 
120-2 
108-6 
153-9 
147-4 

115-1 
107-1 
128-9 
157-7 
132-3 
134-9 

131-7 
131-6 



154-8 
167-9 
175-2 
162-3 
168-3 
174-6 

152-8 
144-2 
143-9 
142-5 
160-5 
137-5 

144-1 
95-4 

148-7 
166-3 
106-3 
124-2 

114-0 
100-0 
137-7 
121-7 
132-7 
135-3 

134-7 
154-0 
130-7 
117-2 
147-8 
150-5 

115-7 
105-1 
128-9 
157-7 
132-3 
134-9 

131-7 
131-6 



155-6 
168-8 
176-1 
162-3 
169-0 
174-6 

152-8 
158-1 
159-7 
157-2 
172-8 
138-9 

143-1 
96-3 
164-1 
167-3 
106-3 
124-2 

114-0 
100-0 
137-7 
121-7 
132-7 
137-3 

155-1 
160-4 
136-8 
127-8 
153-9 
145-5 

122-4 
105-6 
131-1 
157-7 
132-3 
134-9 

132-0 
131-6 



163-1 
177-2 
185-7 
168-6 
173-5 
1740 

171-1 
162-6 
164-8 
162-4 
178-1 
140-3 

176-3 
114-7 
164-1 
168-3 
106-3 
124-2 

114-0 
100-0 
139-6 
124-2 
133-6 
137-3 

153-1 
180-8 
142-1 
126-5 
151-9 
144-3 

132-1 
107-1 
132-6 
168-8 
132-3 
134-9 

132-8 
131-6 



163-8 

178-1 

186-1 

169 

173-5 

174-6 

157-7 
163-3 
164-3 
162-7 
178-1 
141-0 

178-9 
139-4 
164-8 
169-7 
106-3 
124-2 

114-0 
100-0 
152-8 
128-3 
139-8 
139-2 

138-8 
134-1 
143-0 
125-2 
153-2 
141-5 

137-6 
119-8 
134-0 
175-8 
132-3 
134-9 

133-4 
131-6 



164-2 
177- 

186-1 
169-2 
173-5 
175-7 

156-7 

163-7 

165 

162-7 

178-1 

141-0 

179-9 
139-4 
164-8 
170-2 
106-3 
124-2 

114-0 
100-0 
161-3 
130-0 
142-5 
154-9 

134-7 
128-0 
143-0 
125-8 
153-9 
145-2 

140-0 
123-9 
134-0 
176-9 
132-3 
134-9 

133-4 
131-6 



163-8 
177-6 
186-1 
169-2 
173-5 
175-7 

156-0 
163-3 
165-4 
162-7 
178-1 
141-0 

175-1 
139-4 
164-8 
170-7 
107-9 
124-2 

114-0 
100-0 
166-0 
130-8 
145-1 
162-7 

130-6 
126-8 
144-7 
125-2 
154-6 
149-5 

140-0 
125-4 
134-0 
178-7 
132-3 
134-9 

133-7 
131-6 



45-7 
42-1 
42-8 
26-9 
23-7 
29-7 

44-3 
44-4 
31-5 
51-9 
20-3 
20-3 

54-5 
15-2 
45-0 
35-5 



7-2 
9-2 
17-6 
15-7 
16-4 



6-4 
41-6 
16-5 
18-9 
45-3 
48-6 



45-2 
38-7 



Descriptions and units of sale apply to December 1946 prices. 



79014— 8i 



106 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE [JANUARY 

TABLE IV —RETAIL PRICES OF STAPLE FOODS. 





Beef 


I 

o 

o 

=3 

2 

e 

> 


1 

s 

M 

JJ 


Pork 


-6 
8 




1 

C 

Hi 


© 

1 

<D © 

Mm 

c o, 

is 


©" 

1 

< 

© c 
"S ■ 

H 


■1 

a 

il 


a 
ft 

© 

a 

93 
U 
© . 

Il 
a ft 

CQ 


2 
1 
a 
.2 
•3 

03 

3 
as 

o 

is 

_c ft 
O 


S 
2 
* 

•i 

CQ 


g 

E 

£ ft 


s 

M 

I 
h 




Locality 


f • 


J4 

I 1 


S .a 

ftfc 

O 4) 


1 

cq 


0> 

c 
o 

Is 

0Q 




u 

h 
ii 




"3 

«o3"u 

. S3 

© Q. 
TJ . 

«? 

II 


Ii 

e° 

O 




cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


Ct8. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


Ct8. 


cts. 


cts. 


Ct8. 


Ct8. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


P.E.I. 

1— Charlottetown 


45-5 


42-0 


38-7 


28-3 






44-1 


43-1 


34-2 


49 


7 


21- 


20-8 


57-6 


13-0 


47-0 


35-6 


7-3 


4-6 


6-1 


10-0 


Nota Scotia— 

2— Halifax 


47-8 
49-0 
49-9 
48-3 

48-7 


44-3 
45-3 
44-8 
45-3 

44-7 


41-7 
44-7 
36-0 
43-6 

47-0 


27-4 
28-8 
29-9 

28-4 

28-5 


24-2 
24-3 
24-5 
26-0 

25-1 


24-3 
29-7 


46-5 
47-7 
46-1 
45-6 

46-8 


46-6 
47-1 
45-5 

46-6 

43-5 


31-9 
32-6 
34-4 
34-7 

30-7 


53 
53 

53 
53 

53 


1 
3 
6 



3 


21 -r 

22v 

21-( 

21-" 


20-5 
J 20-5 

)20-0 
20-6 

r 19-9 


58-9 
58-2 
58-9 
58-6 

57-1 


15-0 
14-0 
16-0 
14-0 

14-0 


47-0 
47-1 
47-1 
46-8 

46-8 


36-6 
37-5 
37-7 
39-3 

34-7 


8-0 
7-3 

7-3 

6-7 

7-3 


4-5 
4-9 
4-6 
4-9 

4-8 


S-2 
71 

7-S 

7-f 

6-t 


10-0 


3 — New Glasgow 


10-0 


4 — Sydney 


9-9 


5 — Truro 


9-9 


New Brunswick— 

6— Fredericton 


9-5 


7 — Moncton 


47-2 
47-4 

45-7 


44-2 
44-9 

42-6 


46-4 
40-3 

42-7 


27-7 
27-1 

27-4 


25-1 
24-0 

22-5 


30-0 


47-0 
46-5 


45-9 
47-5 

43-7 


32-1 
32-4 

33 6 


54 
51 

54 


5 
3 

5 


20 -r 
20-' 

2K 


20-2 
'20-1 


58-3 
58-6 

58-5 


14-0 
150 

15-0 


47-0 
47-0 

45-0 


35-7 
34-6 

33-7 


8-0 
7-3 

6-7 


4-5 
4-2 

4-3 


7-1 
7-1 


10-0 


8 — Saint John 


9-7 


Quebec— 

9 — Chicoutimi 


9-9 


10— Hull 


42-3 
44-2 
45-0 
41-5 


40-4 
41-2 

41-8 
37-3 


40-1 
43-8 
43-1 

38-8 


28-0 
26-0 
27-8 
26-8 


22-4 
24-2 
22-7 
22-0 


30-4 
29-4 
29-7 
32-3 


44-2 
44-1 
43-5 
41-7 


43-6 
42-6 
39-6 
41-2 
43-0 


31-8 

31-7 
31-8 
30-c 


52 

53 
50 
51 
55 


5 

3 

9 

7 


19-' 
19-< 
20-1 

20- 
21-. 


'20-1 
» 19-8 

5 20-6 
1 19-0 
5 20-7 


57-3 
58-1 
56-4 
56-0 
55-3 


15-0 
15-5 
15-0 
14-0 
14-0 


44-2 
45-4 
45-6 
45-0 
45-0 


32-3 
35-2 
35-0 
33-4 
36-0 


5-3 
6-0 
5-5 
5-3 
5-3 


3-8 
3-8 
3-6 

4-1 
4-1 


7-f 

:■: 

8-C 

s-c 

8-C 


9-4 


11 — Montreal 


9-2 


12 — Quebec 


9-5 


13— St. Hyacinth* 


9-8 


14— St. Johna 


9-7 


16 — Sherbrooke 


45-7 


41-4 


41-4 


27-8 


22-8 


33-9 


46-5 


42-1 


30-1 


50 


3 


20- 


5 20-0 


56-7 


15-0 


44-4 


35-8 


6-0 


4-2 


:■{ 


9-7 


16 — Sorel 


43-7 
39-0 


39-6 
38-1 


42-0 


26-7 
28-3 


23-4 
20-9 






39-6 
39-4 


30-1 
29-1 


52 
45 







21- 


120-3 
19-7 


55-7 

56-0 


14-0 
14-0 


45-3 
44-6 


32-7 
34-3 


5-3 
5-3 


4-1 
4-0 


7-S 


10-0 


17— Thetford Mines 


9-6 


18— Three Rivera 


43-1 


40-3 


38-9 


28-7 


24-0 


30-7 


41-0 


39-1 


30-J 


53 


7 


20- 


3 19-8 


56-9 


15-0 


45-0 


34-8 


6-0 


3-9 


7-i 


9-6 


Ontario— 

19— Belleville 


47-0 


42-6 


44-2 


26-6 


24-0 


27-7 


44-5 


46-2 


31-4 


52 


6 


20- 


319-7 


52-3 


15-0 


45-4 


33-7 


6-7 


4-2 


7( 


8-6 


20— Brantford 


47-3 


43-9 


44-1 


27-7 


23-8 


30-8 


45-0 


45-7 


31-4 


52 


7 


20- 


J 20-0 


50-5 


15-0 


45-4 


35-2 


6-7 


4-2 


7-4 


9-1 


21— Brockville 


48-4 


44-4 


46-3 


27-7 


23-9 




45-7 


43-1 


30-' 


54 


2 


20- 


5 19-3 


51-3 


15-0 


44-3 


33-8 


6-3 


4-0 


7-1 


8-8 


22— Chatham 


46-0 


42-1 


43-2 


26-7 


25-4 


32-3 


44-5 


46-3 


33-2 


52 


1 


20- 


\ 19-9 


47-7 


15-0 


45-0 




5-3 


4-1 


6-- 


8-7 


23— Cornwall 


47-5 


44-5 


45-6 


28-0 


27-1 




45-3 


45-1 


32-f 


51 


9 


20- 


3 19-6 


52-6 


15-0 


45-1 


33-3 


6-0 


3-9 


:•: 


9-1 


24— Fort William 


44-9 


41-6 


43-8 


25-6 


24-1 


29-3 


45-8 






50 


3 


19- 


3 19-5 


55-8 


16-0 


44-8 




6-0 


3-9 


6-i 


8-7 


25— Gait 


46-3 


42-4 


43-2 


26-6 


23-5 


29-7 


44-0 


46-0 




54 


1 


20- 


• 19-8 


52-8 


15-0 


45-1 


36-7 


6-7 


4-0 


7-S 


8-9 


26— Guelph 


46-8 


43-5 


43-6 


27-7 


24-7 


33-2 


45-0 


46-1 


32-e 


51 


8 


20- 


3 19-8 


51-1 


15-0 


45-5 


37-5 


6-0 


4-1 


7-J 


8-7 


27— Hamilton 


46-0 


42-9 


44-4 


27-3 


24-2 


30-2 


44-8 


46-1 


31-C 


52 


8 


20- 


\ 19-3 


53-4 


16-0 


45-6 


36-0 


6-0 


4-2 


7-4 


8-8 


28— Kingston 


47-3 


42-6 


45-2 


27-6 


24-0 




45-1 


44-9 


31-( 


52 





20 


I 19-3 


54-8 


15-0 


44-6 


34-8 


6-0 


4-3 


7-1 


9-1 


29— Kitchener 


45-2 


42-5 


44-5 


26-9 


23-9 


30-5 


44-8 


45-4 


ai-i 


52 


5 


20- 


3 20-2 


50-4 


15-0 


45-3 


35-2 


6-7 


4-0 


7-4 


8-9 


30 — London 


46-5 


43-1 


44-1 


27-4 


24-1 


31-7 


44-8 


45-S 


30-f 


51 


8 


20 < 


5 19-8 


51-8 


15-0 


45-4 


34-7 


6-0 


4-0 


71 


8-8 


31— Niagara Falls 


46-2 


42-3 


44-4 


26-7 


23-2 




44-7 


44-6 


31-S 


52 


6 


20- 


3 19-7 


55-8 


15-5 


45-2 




6-0 


4-1 


6-i 


8-9 


32— North Bay 


45-0 


42-1 


44-3 


26-6 


24-7 


31-0 


45-1 


45-8 


29-' 


52 


6 


21- 


) 19-7 


57-7 


16-0 


45-5 




6-7 


4-2 


8-1 


9-7 


33— Oahawa 


45-7 


43-3 


45-6 


27-4 


23-5 




43-7 


46-2 


30-J 


52 


3 


20- 


1 19-6 


53-2 


15-0 


45-7 


35-7 


6-0 


4-0 


7-1 


9-0 


34— Ottawa 


46-3 


43-0 


44-3 


26-9 


23-9 


30-2 


45-7 


44-9 


31-4 


53 


6 


20- 


3 19-4 


56-5 


15-0 


44-6 


33-2 


6-7 


3-8 


7-1 


8-9 



1947] prices 

coal and rentals by cities, december, 1946 



107 



v 


Canned 
egetables 


•3 

I* 

I-* 

m 


| 
M 

o 

8 . 

li 

o 


II 

Pi 




J4 

1 

£ 

CO 

Is 


e 
B 

1! 

IS 

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§ 

i! 
is 

h5 


S 03 
03 O 

IS 


IS 

a 9 


be 

© • 
■S3 

h 


a*! 

o 


Sugar 


a 

3 

-3 

e 

a . 

9 M 

ia §5 
o a 
O 


h 

is 

as 

03— < 

«l 


Coal 






-o 
a 
-u . 

IS 

o 


as 






II 
il 

aj cn 

J* 


.3 
8 - 

■- N 

o o 

-Co 

fi 


u 

§s 

o 


3* 


S 

1* 

.IS. 
pq 


Rent (a) 


eta. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


s 


1 


$ 


17-9 


16-3 


16-9 


8-7 


7-2 


33-0 


16-8 


20-8 


49-8 


65-4 


46-4 


25-8 


40-1 


32-2 


8-6 


8-1 


54-9 


38-0 




11-90 


24 -00-28 -00(b) 1 


18-3 


15-6 


16-8 


9-2 


6-1 


37-1 


16-6 


18-0 


49-4 


56-8 




25-0 


39-9 


34-0 


8-6 


8-5 


50-3 


38-0 




12-63 


27-50-31-50 2 


18-8 


15-0 


17-5 


8-3 


6-6 


42-9 


17-4 


191 


45-3 


54-2 




25-0 


38-6 


33-1 


8-3 


8-3 


53-9 


38-0 






16-00-20-00 3 


18-2 


16-4 


16-8 


9-0 


6-2 


38-7 


17-8 


19-4 


51-8 


58-9 


46-6 


25-1 


39-1 


32-7 


8-6 


8-6 


50-5 


37-8 




7-08 


18-00-2200(b) 4 


18-5 


16-0 


17-2 


8-8 


5-6 


39-0 


18-9 


19-0 


47-3 


60-5 




25-6 


38-4 


34-3 


8-7 


8-7 


51-6 


38-0 




11-75 


26-50-30-50 5 


17-9 


16-4 


17-3 


8-4 


6-4 


41-5 


17-3 


21*1 


45-9 


57-3 




24-5 


39-9 


33-0 


8-5 


8-3 


51-4 


37-9 




12-41 


21 -00-25 -00(b) 6 


18-4 


15-9 




8-6 


6-9 


38-8 


17-2 


19-7 


46-4 


56-8 




24-4 


39-0 


34-1 


9-0 


8-9 


51-0 


38-0 




12-28 


26 -00-30 -00(b) 7 


17-7 


15-7 


15-9 


8-6 


6-1 


36-5 


16-7 


19-3 


51-4 


55-8 


45-7 


25-0 


38-4 


33-9 


8-5 


8-3 


48-6 


38-0 




130-3 


20 -50-24 -50(b) 8 


16-3 


15-1 
14-6 


15-7 
16-2 


8-2 
8-3 


8-3 
6-9 


42-4 
41-0 


15-7 
15-1 


17-5 


42-7 
40-0 


55-0 
45-9 


45-0 
42-0 




40-0 
35-8 


33-3 
30-6 


8-6 
8-3 


8-2 
8-1 


53-7 
45-7 


40-0 
3S-9 


18-00 
16-75 




.. 9 


16-9 




15-50-19-50 10 


16-2 


14-7 


15-1 


8-7 


6-8 


38-4 


15-6 


19-4 


42-4 


44-3 


44-0 


25-3 


36-0 


30-9 


8-0 


8-0 


46-8 


39-5 


16-75 




23 -00-27 -00(b) 11 


17-4 


15-6 


16-1 


9-2 


7-2 


37-9 


15-8 


19-3 


47-1 


51-9 


45-0 


25-0 


38-0 


32-3 


8-1 


7-9 


44-3 


40-0 


16-00 




27 -50-31 -50(b) 12 


15-2 


151 


15-4 


8-9 


7-8 


43-7 


16-3 


18-5 


44-7 


45-8 


46-4 


23-4 


37-1 


32-3 


8-0 


7-9 


43-3 


40-1 


15-75 




16 -00-20 -00(b) 13 


16-3 


15-5 
14-9 


15-7 
16-3 


8-2 

8-7 


8-4 
7-2 


44-3 
40-7 


15-7 
16-0 


19-3 


49-9 
43-1 


47-2 
46-4 


44-0 
46-0 


25-4 


38-5 
39-2 


31-7 
33-4 


8-0 
8-0 


7-9 
8-0 


42-3 
41-6 


39-7 
39-5 


15-50 

17-50 




14 


17-3 




20-00-24-00 (b)15 


16-5 


14-8 
150 


15-7 
16-1 


18-7 

8-8 


7-2 

7-7 


45-6 
40-0 


16-3 
17-9 


19-2 
19-0 


49-3 
49-2 


49-5 
50-5 


45-0 
45-7 


26-5 
25-7 


38-5 
38-5 


31-8 
32-6 


7-9 
8-1 


7-7 
7-6 


48-7 
48-0 


39-4 
39-5 


16-25 
19-00 




16 


17-6 




1400-1800(b) 17 


16-8 


14-9 


15-5 


8-7 


7-8 


39-8 


16-9 


20-4 


45-7 


47-5 


43-3 




37-8 




8-4 


8-0 


48-2 


39-9 


16-00 




20 -00-24 -00(b) 18 


15-9 


14-8 


15-6 


6-7 


6-1 


40-4 


16-4 


18-4 


47-4 


46-0 




24-4 


35-6 


31-2 


8-4 


8-3 


4-49 


39-0 


16-00 




19 


16-5 


15-5 


16-0 


8-6 


6-6 


39-0 




18-4 


42-6 


41-2 


39-5 


24-7 


34-5 


29-6 


8-3 


8-3 


45-6 


39-2 


16-00 




22-00-25-00 20 


16-9 


14-9 


15-8 


7-8 


6-9 


41-4 


16-7 


18-7 


43-7 


47-3 




25-5 


36-1 


30-0 


8-3 


8-1 


45-5 


38-4 


16-00 




20-00-2400 12 


16-9 


15-7 


16-2 


7-8 


6-4 


40-0 






42-8 


43-0 


43-3 


25-4 


34-3 


30-4 


8-6 


8-6 


43-2 


28-1 


16-00 




21-50-25-50 22 


17-4 


16-5 


16-2 


7-9 


6-6 


42-7 


15-0 




43-0 


43-4 






35-7 


31-0 


8-1 


8-1 


45-6 


38-6 


16-50 




23 -00-27 -00(b) 23 


16-8 


15-2 


15-8 


6-8 


6-2 


41-4 


16-2 




44-9 


49-7 


45-8 


24-2 


40-0 


28-0 


8-6 


8-6 


42-1 


38-1 


16-80 




25-50-29-50 24 


17-3 


15-4 


15-5 


8-2 


6-2 


36-4 


16-8 


17-7 


42-5 


45-9 


44-7 


24-4 


33-6 


29-2 


8-5 


8-3 


44-6 


39-6 


16-00 




22-00-26-00 25 


18-0 


16-0 


16-2 


7-3 


6-2 


37-6 


16-8 


18-7 


39-0 


42-4 


42-0 


24-6 


34-6 


30-2 


8-5 


8-4 


43-7 


38-6 


16-00 




22-50-26-50 26 


17-1 


15-0 


15-6 


7-8 


6-3 


39-9 


17-1 


18-0 


46-2 


42-4 


43-0 


24-1 


34-3 


30-2 


8-1 


8-1 


43-4 


39-4 


15-50 




26-50-30-50 27 


16-6 


15-1 


15-7 


7-9 


6-7 


43-6 


18-0 


18-7 


43-1 


45-9 


43-3 


25-0 


35-9 


29-3 


8-1 


8-0 


13-9 


38-8 


16-00 




29-50-33-50 28 


16-8 


15-5 


15-2 


7-5 


6-6 


38-0 


16-3 


18-8 


43-7 


45-9 


42-1 


24-5 


34-9 


30-3 


8-6 


8-4 


42-4 


39-4 


16-00 




27-50-31-50 29 


17-3 


15-4 


16-2 


7-5 


6-1 


39-5 


18-0 


17-9 


42-4 


43-5 


42-8 


25-3 


34-3 


29-1 


8-6 


8-4 


44-2 


39-2 


16-50 




27-00-31-00 30 


17-3 


14-9 
16-1 


15-3 
16-4 


7-2 
7-9 


5-1 
5-3 


38-1 
43-6 






41-3 
40-3 


43-8 
51-5 




24-2 
25-3 


35-8 
36-9 


29-3 


8-5 
9-0 


8-6 
8-9 


44-3 
50-5 


39-5 
39-5 


14-63 
17-25 




25-00-29-00 31 


17-9 


16-5 




23-00-27-00 32 


16-9 


15-2 


15-6 


8-1 


5-1 


36-1 


18-3 




44-0 


42-7 




24-6 


36-0 


29-4 


8-5 


8-2 


46-5 


39-5 


16-00 




26-00-300-00 33 


16-9 


15-2 


16-6 


8-3 


7-0 


40-3 


18-3 


19-3 


47-4 


48-1 


45-0 


23-6 


37-8 


31-0 


8-3 


8-1 


44-0 


39-0 


16-75 




.. 31-50-35-50 34 









108 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



TABLE IV— RETAIL PRICES OF STAPLE FOODS, 





Beef 






1 
2 

« . 
It 

►3 


Pork 


(O 

■6 
© 

u 
To 

$ 

Jx 

©* © 

-a a 

"?' 

PQ 


03 
O 

&x 


x 

i§ 
**> 

M 


(O 
©* 

I 

< 

as n 
t* 

as 




1 

© 

H 

3 ft 

PQ 


a 

I 
f 



h 




$ 
x 
* 

i 

^x5 

n 

PQ 


©* 

-0 

6 

■— 
E . 

.2 ft 


(c) 

©* 

3f 

-a 

I 

i 

ii 
1* 




Locality 


i. 

if 

02 


1 


■6 

3 

1 

of 

a 
I 

+»■ 

h 

s 


i 

©T 

PQ 


(c) 

1 

"© 

a 
o 
X 

%2 

S ft 


n 

a 
o 
X 

1 

c 

■§•=' 

si 

> 


(c) 

Si 

§ -l 
jg 

XI& 

Si 


(c) 

xi 

|J 

ote 
-a 

m X 

x 


.1 

A 

E° 





cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


Ct8. 


cts 


eta. 


cts. 


cts. 


eta. 


Ct8. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


35 — Owen Sound 


45-1 
47-9 
46-0 
46-1 
46-5 
47-2 
46-6 
44-4 
45-2 


42-6 
44-1 
42-1 
42-5 
42-9 
43-8 
42-6 
41-8 
41-3 


44-0 


26-7 
27-7 
26-0 
27-6 
27-2 
28-6 
27-6 
27-2 
26-7 


23-4 
24-8 
23-8 
24-1 
24-0 
24-7 
24-5 
24-0 
24-2 




44-3 
44-5 
44-6 
44-7 
44-7 
43-8 
43-3 
45-0 
43-4 


46-1 
45-2 
46-2 
46-6 
45-5 
46-0 
43-6 
45-6 
43-9 


31-3 
31-0 
32-5 
31-7 
32-9 
31-6 
32-0 
30-4 
33-8 


53-2 
51-8 
53-4 
51-6 
51-7 
51-4 
50-2 
52-1 
50-3 


20-5 
20-5 
19-4 
20-8 
20-9 
20-6 
20-1 
20-6 
20-8 


20-0 
19-4 
19-4 
19-4 
20-2 
20-6 
19-4 
20-7 
20-2 


49-3 
52-5 
56-3 
55-1 
50-6 
52-6 
57-6 
49-9 
57-8 


15-0 
15-0 
16-0 
15-5 
15-0 
15-0 
16-0 
15-0 
16-0 


45-3 
45-3 
45-0 
45-7 
45-6 
45-7 
44-8 
45-4 
44-5 


35-8 
35-6 
34-5 
36-5 
34-7 
35-5 
34-7 
36-6 
35-2 


6-0 
6-0 
6-3 
6-0 
6-0 
6-0 
6-7 
5-3 
6-7 


4-2 
4-3 
4-1 
4-1 
4-2 
4-0 
4-0 
3-9 
4-1 


6-7 
7-6 
6-3 
7-1 
7-3 
7-1 
7-3 
7-6 
7-5 


9-1 




45 
43 
43 
43 

43 
43 

43 
41 


2 
3 
5 
8 
9 
3 
2 
7 


32 
29 
30 
30 

2s 





4 
6 

4 


8-5 


37— Port Arthur 


8-9 


38— St. Catharines 


8-9 


39— St. Thomas 


9-2 




9-1 


41— Sault Ste. Marie 


8-7 


42— Stratford 


9-1 


43— Sudbury 


8-9 




47-0 
46-9 
45-4 
46-0 
46-7 

44-2 


42-6 
43-3 
42-2 
42-2 
43-7 

40-0 


44 
46 
43 
41 
43 

41 


5 
3 
1 
3 

7 

5 


27-3 
28-0 
26-5 
27-0 
29-0 

25-2 


24-0 
23-7 
23-6 
24-1 
25-2 

23-4 


29 

30 
29 
32 


4 
5 
6 
3 


43-7 
44-5 
44-0 

44-6 


45-5 
46-9 
44-3 
46-7 
45-3 

44-6 


31-1 

31-7 
32-2 
32-5 

31-4 


51-6 
52-7 
51-8 
51-6 
50-7 

51-4 


20-8 
20-2 
20-9 
20-5 
20-5 

19-1 


20-1 
19-3 
20-2 
19-7 
19-7 

21-3 


58-5 
54-G 
54-1 
52-9 
51-4 

53-3 


17-0 
16-0 
16-0 
16-0 
15-0 

13-0 


44-8 
45-3 
45-4 
45-0 
45-0 

42-7 


34-6 
38-0 
37-0 
36-3 
36-3 

34-7 


6-7 
6-7 
6-7 
6-0 
6-0 

7-1 


4-2 
4-2 
4-1 
4-1 
3-8 

3-8 


7-7 
7-2 
7-2 
7-2 
7-0 

5-4 


9-5 


45— Toronto 


8-7 


46— Welland 


8-9 




8-8 


48— Woodstock 


8-8 


Manitoba— 
49 — Brandon 






43-3 


9-0 


60— Winnipeg 


44-3 


39-6 


36 


5 


24-7 


22-2 


27 


8 


42-4 


43-6 


31-4 


49-4 


18-7 


19-8 


54-8 


14-0 


42-4 


35-0 


8-0 


3-6 


6-5 


8-7 


Saskatchewan— 

51— Moose Jaw 


41-8 


37-7 


38 


6 


24-0 


21-0 






41-8 


39-4 


28-7 


50-0 


18-4 


21-9 




150 


42-4 




7-2 


3-8 


6-5 


8-7 


52— Prince Albert 


40-3 


37-8 






23-6 




27 





40-5 






49-2 


18-8 


22-1 


53-7 


14-0 


43-3 




6-0 


4-1 


6-3 


8-5 


53— Regina 


42-7 


39-3 


39 


7 


24-1 


21-7 


27 


7 


42-8 


41-0 


28-1 


50-0 


19-0 


22-3 


53-9 


14-0 


42-4 




6-8 


3-8 


5-6 


91 


54 — Saskatoon 


43-3 


39-5 


39 





24-5 


21-5 


28 





40-5 


41-7 


28-7 


49-4 


18-5 


21-2 


52-9 


14-0 


42-3 




7-2 


3-7 


61 


8-9 


Alberta— 

65— Calgary 


44-9 


40-4 


40 


2 


24-9 


22-1 


27 


5 


41-8 






51-1 


18-6 


20-7 


53-1 


14-0 


43-0 


36-5 


7-2 


3-8 


5-7 


8-7 


56 — Drumheller 


43-0 
44-7 


39-6 
39-7 


38 

4(1 


7 
4 


24-2 
24-0 


21-4 
22-8 








41-0 
41-3 


29-7 
26-7 


51-1 
50-4 


19-5 
18-9 


22-3 
21-5 


520 
51-5 


14-0 
14-0 


44-3 
43-1 


36-4 


8-0 
7-2 


4-3 
3-8 


7-6 
6-3 


90 


67 — Edmonton 


20 


2 


40-4 


8-7 


68— Lethbridge 


44-8 


39-8 


38 


2 


24-4 


22-0 


27 


3 


41-5 


44-3 


29-0 


49-1 


19-2 


22-2 


54-0 


14-0 


43-0 




8-0 


3-9 


6-1 


8-7 


British Columbia— 

59 — Nanaimo 


49-2 


43-9 


46 


8 


27-6 


24-6 






43-7 






52-5 






52-0 


16-0 


450 




9-0 


4-3 


7-3 


9-6 


60 — New Westminster 


46-9 


42-3 


12 


3 


26-0 


23-8 


29 


5 


43-6 


446- 


32-0 


52-0 


20-4 


20-5 


49-5 


14-0 


44-8 




8-5 


4-1 


7-4 


9-2 


61— Prince Rupert 


46-7 


43-0 


15 


5 


26-0 








45-5 






53-0 


20-7 


22-0 


57-0 


19-0 


45-0 




10-0 


4-9 


8-3 


9-7 


62— Trail 


46-5 


42-2 


44 


6 


25-8 


24-5 


29 





45-0 






52-8 


20-2 


22-8 


56-3 


17-0 


45-2 




9-0 


4-0 


7-2 


9-3 


63— Vancouver 


47-8 


43-3 


44 


1 


27-1 


24-4 


28 


7 


44-0 


46-1 


32-9 


52-6 


20-5 


20-3 


49-4 


14-0 


44-7 


36-0 


9-6 


4-1 


7-0 


8-9 


64 — Victoria 


47-3 


43-4 


44 


8 


26-8 


24-0 


29 


3 


45-0 


46-5 


33-1 


53-5 


21-1 


20-9 


53-8 


15-0 


44-8 


38-4 


9-0 


4.3 


7-3 


90 



1947] prices 

coal and rentals by cities, december, 1946 



109 



( 


?annec 
sgetabl 


es 


£ 

u 

•v 

a 

o 

a 
a 

?* 

PQ 






03 

Sua 


I 1 


^4 

m 

8 

0) 

<u 
go 

e— • 

cs a 






ll 


4> S3 

ja"i 

* i 
& ° 

.fcje* 

I 1 










a*! 

o » 

O 


Sugar 


a 

3 

'■3 

IV 

a . 
o 


.2 M 
T3 03 

!I 

29 i. 

H 


Coal 


Rent (a) 






M 
.S 

M 
a 

o 

ll 

o 


I 

o 


.f.S 

1? 
1* 

Ph 


® » 

"3 8 

"Sea 

I* 


13 

IS. 




=3 8. 


is 

a a 
< 


If 

~a 
pq 




•1 
Is 

« CO 

1" 


e 

ll 

o o 

Jo 
on 

I 1 


o a 
O 




cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


$ 


S 


S 




17-2 


15-3 


16-0 


8-3 


54 


7 


38-7 


17-4 


18-2 


47 


4 


47-3 




24 


2 


35 


3 


31-2 


8-6 


8 


5 


47-8 


39-2 


16-50 




16-00-200-00 


35 


16-7 


14-7 


15-8 


7-7 


5 


6 


38-9 


16-3 


18-4 


47 


3 


43-4 


43-2 


24 


9 


35 


4 


30-9 


8-7 


8 


6 


43-1 


39-1 


16-75 




24-00-28-00 


36 


17-5 


15-8 


16-5 


7-5 


6 


5 


43-8 


16-5 




44 


8 


50-6 


46-6 


25 


5 


39 


6 


29-1 


8-6 


8 


5 


42-6 


38-4 


16-80 




23-00-2700 


37 


16-8 


15-0 


15-6 


7-7 


5 


7 


39-0 






40 


9 


43-8 


45-4 


24 


5 


33 


9 


30-8 


8-4 


8 


3 


43-4 


39-3 


15-75 




27-00-31-00 


38 


17-3 


15-7 


16-3 


7-5 


6 


4 


37-5 






47 


8 


47-4 




24 


9 


37 


8 


29-8 


8-7 


8 





47-0 


40-0 


16-00 




21-00-25-00 


39 


17-2 


16-4 
15-4 


16-7 
16-4 


8-1 
7-3 


7 
5 



8 


44-9 
43-6 


16-8 
15-5 




45 

42 


5 

7 


44-0 
46-9 




25 
25 


2 
2 


35 
30 


6 
4 


30-5 

30-0 


8-8 
8-5 


8 
8 


7 
5 


45-6 
42-0 


39-2 
39-0 


16-50 
17-00 






40 


17-6 




23-00-27-00 


41 


17-1 


15-9 


16-9 


7-6 


6 


1 


39-2 


17-3 


18-5 


44 


6 


45-8 


43-0 


24 


6 


34 


6 


31-5 


8-8 


8 


6 


45-7 


38-7 


16-00 




22-00-26-00 


42 


18-1 


15-9 


17-2 


8-1 


6 


1 


38-1 


15-8 


19-7 


43 


3 


49-5 


45-3 


24 


9 


30 


8 


30-9 


8-8 


8 


5 


44-9 


38-6 


17-75 




28-50-32-50 


43 


17-9 


16-1 


16-9 


7-3 


5 


9 


45-8 


16-9 


18-3 


48 


6 


50-4 


48-0 


25 


4 


37 


4 


33-4 


8-8 


8 


8 


43-5 


39-1 


19-50 




27-50-31-50 


44 


16-7 


15-2 


15-5 


7-6 


4 


9 


39-0 


17-4 


18-7 


42 


5 


42-2 


43-3 


24 


2 


35 


2 


30-2 


8-2 


8 





45-1 


38-7 


15-50 




32-50-36-50 


45 


16-7 


14-7 
15-7 


14-9 
16-2 


6-7 

7-7 


5 
5 


3 
7 


38-3 
40-7 


16-4 


18-0 
18-4 


40 
42 


9 

7 


43-5 
42-5 




23 
24 


3 

7 


24 
34 



1 


28-9 
29-0 


8-3 
8-2 


8 
8 


3 




41-7 
43-5 


39-2 
38-7 


15-50 
16-00 






46 


16-8 




25-00-29-00 


47 


16-6 


15-6 


16-3 


7-4 


6 





36-3 




17-7 


40 


8 


42-9 




24 


8 


34 


5 


29-5 


8-6 


8 


5 


45-3 


39-2 


16-00 





22-50-26-50 


48 


18-7 


17-3 


17-3 


7-9 


5 


8 


38-3 


16-3 


18-8 


46 


3 


49-4 


49-0 


20 


1 


39 


9 


28-9 


9-2 


9 





45-9 


38-0 




9-30 


21-50-25-50 


49 


18-7 


16-9 


17-8 


9-1 


6 


6 


43-5 


15-9 


18-1 


42 


9 


47-5 


48-3 


25 


8 


37 


5 


28-4 


9-0 


9 





37-7 


37-8 




14-20 


26-50-30-50 


50 


19-7 


15-6 


17-0 


9-0 


6 


1 


43-5 






45 


6 


47-6 




25 


5 


30 


8 


29-8 


9-7 


9 


7 


44-0 


37-8 




11-40 


22-50-26-50 


51 


18-3 


16-3 


17-6 


7-7 


7 


6 


48-5 


17-2 


20-3 


49 





53-3 


43-0 


24 


1 


38 


4 


30-4 


9-9 


9 


6 


42-9 


38-4 




11-60 


19-50-23-50 


52 


19-9 


16-4 


17-2 


9-1 


6 


3 


41-0 


16-0 


20-0 


50 


2 


43-7 


43-8 


25 


7 


37 


7 


30-3 


9-4 


9 


7 


44-0 


38-1 




12-60 


28-50-32-50 


5a 


21-0 


17-3 


17-8 


9-4 


6 


9 


45-0 


16-9 


20-2 


47 


2 


58-6 


47-1 


24 


1 


30 


9 


29-9 


9-7 


9 


9 


45-3 


37-9 




11-20 


22-50.26-50 


54 


19-0 


15-8 


16-5 


9-9 


6 


2 


47-2 


16-6 


19-6 


4G 


2 


55-1 


47-9 


24 


9 


34 


7 


29-8 


9-0 


9 


5 


42-3 


37-7 




9-60 


26-00-30-00 


55 


19-6 


16-6 
15-7 


17-2 
16-6 


9-7 
9-5 


6 

6 


3 
9 


50-7 
41-5 


16-3 
16-5 


21-1 
19-0 


43 

48 


4 
1 


54-8 
46-1 


48-5 
53-9 


24 
23 




2 


37 
20 


2 



31- 4 
28-4 


9-6 
9-2 


9 
9 


7 
5 


42-7 
43-6 


38-0. 
37-5 






21 -00-25 00 
25-50-29-50 


56 


18-4 




6-80 


57 


19-4 


15-3 


15-7 


9-1 


6 





40-3 


15-8 




40 


9 


54-7 




23 


8 


34 


2 


29-4 


9-2 


9 


3 


43-8 


37-6 




6-50 


22-00-26-00 


58 


18-7 


16-3 
15-9 


16-7 
17-3 


9-3 
9-5 


6 
6 


4 

5 


49-5 
45-7 




18-5 


42 
44 


3 

7 


43-0 
44-0 


56-3 


24 

23 


6 
7 


32 
33 


2 
4 


27-6 
28-2 


8-9 
8-0 


8 

7 


9 

9 


41-6 
37-6 


38-4 
37-9 






17-00-21-00 
20-50-24-50 


50 


18-0 




14-70 


60 


19-7 


17-1 


18-9 


9-6 


7 





57-9 




18-8 


51 


3 


51-8 


51-6 


24 


2 


34 


7 


29-5 


8-9 


8 


7 


44-1 


38-3 




15-50 


20-00-24-00 


61 




16-5 


17-6 


10-8 


6 


7 


51-6 


13-9 


19-0 


44 


3 


60-7 


59-0 


23 


4 


34 


5 


28-9 


8-9 


8 


S 


40-5 


37-7 




13-00 


23-00-27-00 


62 


18-1 


15-4 


16-8 


9-7 


6 


4 


48-4 


14-6 


17-4 


46 


4 


44-8 


52-7 


23 


8 


31 


6 


27-1 


8-0 


8 


1 


40-1 


37-8 




14-70 


25-00-29-00 


63 


18-0 


16-1 


16-5 


9-0 


6 


4 


48-1 


14-3 


18-0 


44 


7 


45-6 


49-0 


23 





32 


5 


26-8 


8-9 


8 


4 


4-45 


38-3 




14-95 


21-00-25-00 


64 



(a) The basis of these figures is the record of rents collected in the 1941 census of housing. The movement since then has 
been determined from reports from real estate agents, the census averages being adjusted in accordance with the changes 
indicated by these reports. 

(b) Rents marked (b) are for apartments or flats. Other rent figures are for single houses. Apartment or flat rents hare 
been shown where this type of dwelling is more common than single houses, (c) Revised. 



110 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



JANUARY 



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112 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



picture of prices throughout Canada as used 
in the calculation of the index of this particular 
group. They are the averages of prices of 
goods reported to the Bureau by independent 
stores. They do not include prices from chain 
stores. As the movement of chain store prices 
agrees closely with the movement of indepen- 
dent store prices it was considered that the 
extra work and cost involved in compiling and 
printing a separate table for chain store prices 
were not warranted, although chain store prices 
are used in the calculation of the index. 

The coal and rental figures given are also 
used in the official cost-of-living index. Quota- 
tions are shown for anthracite coal in the 
provinces of Ontario and Quebec, and for 
bituminous coal in the rest of Canada, where 
this type of coal is more generally used. 

Rental figures given in the table are typical 
of rents being paid by tenant households in 
each city. In some cities, flats and apart- 
ments are more numerous than single houses; 
in such cases rents for flats and apartments 
are shown while figures for other cities repre- 
sent single-house rentals. In all cases figures 
represent rents being paid, not the rent asked 
for vacant dwellings. The basis of these 
figures is the record of rents for every tenth 
tenant-occupied dwelling collected in the 1941 
census of housing. The movement of rents 
since that time has been determined from 
reports submitted by real estate agents. The 
1941 census averages have been adjsuted in 
accordance with the change indicated by 
these reports, and the printed figures show a 
$4 spread centred around each city average. 

Table III is designed to show the variation 
in the retail prices of commodities since the 
beginning of the war. Taking the Dominion 
average retail price of each of the commodi- 
ties at August, 1939, as 100, the table shows 
the percentage changes in prices since that 



date; also the actual price on the first of the 
current month. 

The Dominion Bureau of Statistics issues 
an index number of retail prices of commodi- 
ties included in the cost-of-living index 
excluding rents and services. This index is 
now being included in Table I. 

Explanatory Note as to Cost-of-Living Index 

The index number of the cost of living 
was constructed on the basis of a survey of 
expenditure by 1,439 families of wage-earners 
and salaried workers with earnings between 
$600 and $2 ; 800 m 1938. The average expendi- 
ture was $1,413.90 divided as follows: food 
(31-3 per cent), $443; shelter (19-1 per cent), 
$269.50; fuel and light (6-4 per cent), $90.59; 
clothing (11-7 per cent), $165.80; home- 
furnishings (8-9 per cent), $125.70; miscel- 
laneous (22-6 per cent), $319.40. 

The last-named group includes health (4-3 
per cent), $60.80; personal care (1-7 per cent). 
$23.90; transportation (5-6 per cent), $79.30; 
recreation (5-8 per cent), $82.10; life insur- 
ance (5-2 per cent), $73.30. Other expendi- 
ture not directly represented in the index 
brought the total family living expenditure to 
$1,453.80. 

The control of prices under an Order in 
Council of November 1, 1941, P.C. 8527 
became effective on December 1. 1941 (L.G.. 
1941, page 1371). The order provided that 
no person should sell any goods or supply 
services at prices higher than during the 
period September 15 to October 11. 1941. 
except under the regulations of the Wartime 
Prices and Trade Board. The activities of the 
Board in the operation of the price control 
policy are summarized from time to time in 
the Labour Gazette under the title Price 
Control in Canada. 



Wholesale Prices, November, 1946 



The average level of wholesale prices rose 
a further 0-6 points to 111-4 between October 
and November, supported by increases in a 
wide variety of commodities. Six groups were 
higher, led by a gain of 2-6 points to 140-9 
for the wood, wood products and paper series 
where strength was noted for cedar shingles 
and wood pulp. Higher prices for oranges, 
lemons, rye, hay, rice and turpentine out- 
weighed weakness for potatoes and onions to 
advance the vegetable products group 0-3 to 
97-4 while animal products rose 0-2 to 119-8 
due to increases in livestock and fluid milk 
overbalancing lower quotations for eggs. An 
advance in manila rope was responsible for a 
gain of 0-2 to 98-4 for the textile group index 



while non-metallics moved up the same amount 
to 104-0 following a rise in western bituminous 
coal. Shellac produced a gain of 0-6 to 95-3 
in the chemical group while iron and steel at 
128-6 and non-ferrous metals at 89-7 wore 
unchanged. 

Strength in both field and animal product 
prices moved the composite index of Canadian 
farm product prices at wholesale up 0-6 to 
113-4 between October and November. Up- 
ward adjustments for livestock, fluid milk and 
eggs advanced animal products 1-3 points to 
137-1 while field products registered an upturn 
of 0-1 to 99-2 due to strength in rye and hay 
Potatoes and onions were lower in this section. 



Publications Received in Library of Department of Labour, 
Ottawa, Quarter Ending December, 1946* 



Apprenticeship : 

1. Apprenticeship Practice in the United 

States; as revealed by an analysis of 
workable apprenticeship programs in 
American industry; by Eugene Danaher. 
California, Stanford University, 1945. 
60p. Free. 
Biography : 

2. Bevin of Britain; by Trevor Evans. New- 

York, W. H. Norton and Company, 
1946. 282p. $3. 

3. Citizen 13660; drawings and text by Mine 

Okubo. New York, Columbia Univer- 
sity Press, 1946. 209p. $2.75. 

4. William Sylvis, Pioneer of American La- 

bour; by Jonathan Grossman. New 
York, Columbia University Press, 1945. 
302p. $3.50. 
Collective Bargaining: 

5. Collective Bargaining; text of radio in- 

terview with Charles M. White; by 
Harold Fleming. New York, American 
Iron and Steel Institute, 1945. Free. 
Co-operative Commonwealth Federation: 

6. Report of the Ninth National Convention, 

Aug. 7, 8, 9, 1946. Co-operative Com- 
monwealth Federation. Regina, C.C.F., 
1946. 60p. 
Employment : 

7. Employee Relations in the Public Service. 

Civil Service Assembly of the United 
States and Canada. Chicago, 1942. 246p. 
$3. 

8. Employment, Rehabilitation, and Veteran 

Adjustment; a bibliography 1940-45. 
Compiled by Paul S. Burnham. Chicago, 
Public Administration Series, 1946. 27p. 
$1. 

9. Supply and Demand in the Professions in 

Canada. Ottawa, 1945. 67p. 

10. Women and Work; by Gertrude Wil- 
liams. London, 1945. 128p. $2.50. 

Employment Management: 

11. The Psychology of Personnel; by Henry 
Beaumont. New York, Longmans, Green 
and Co., 1945. 306p. $3.75. 

12. Teamwork in Action. The Story of Joint 
Consultation at the Howard Smith 
Paper Mills, Cornwall, Ont.; by Harry 
J. Waisglass. Ottawa, Industrial Pro- 
duction Co-operation Board, 1946. 23p. 

13. Training for Industrial Employment ; by 
Institute of Labour Management. Lon- 

don, 1946. 65p. 

*Any of the publications in the above catalogue may 
be obtained on loan, free of charge, upon application 
to the Librarian, Department of Labour, Ottawa. 



Housing : 

14. Housing in Canada. A Factual Summary, 
October, 1946. Ottawa, Central Mort- 
gage and Housing Corporation; Eco- 
nomic Research Division, 1946. 58p. 

15. Principles of Planning Small Houses; by 
National Housing Agency. Washington, 
G.P.O., 1946. 44p. 

Industrial Relations: 

16. Addresses on Industrial Relations 1945; 
by Bureau of Industrial Relations, Uni- 
versity of Michigan. Ann Arbor, 1945. 
132p. $2. 

17. Controversy Between General Motors 
and the United Automobile Workers; by 
Hon. James Murray and Hon. Glen H. 
Taylor. Washington, 1945. 32p. Free. 

18. How To Win Workers. Cessna Aircraft 
Company, Personnel Department. Wich- 
ita, Kansas, 1944. 31p. 25c. 

19. Industrial Conflict; a Study of Some 
Fundamentals and of Some Remedies; 
by W. C. Good. Toronto, 1946. 51p. 25c. 

20. Management Techniques for Increasing 
Labor Productivity. Economic Trends. 
Technological Advances. What Is a Fair 
Day's Work? American Management 
Association. New York, 1946. 51p. Pro- 
duction Series No. 163. 75c. 

21. Premier Congres des Relations Indust- 
rielles de Laval. Department des Rela- 
tions Industrielles de la Faculte des 
Sciences Sociales de l'Universite Laval. 
Quebec, 1946. 92p. 

22. A Selected Bibliography on Industrial 
Relations. Kingston, Ont.; Queen's Uni- 
versity. Dept. of Industrial Relations. 
Bulletin No. 11. Kingston, 1946. 77p. 

23. Why Men Strike. Harpers Magazine, 
Nov. 1946. First of three articles to 
appear in Harpers Magazine. 

Industry : 

24. Australian Textile Mills; a Guide to 
Good Working Conditions. Australia. 
Dept. of Labour and National Service; 
Industrial Welfare Division. Bulletin 
No. 7. Melbourne, 1946. 54p. 

25. General Leathercraft; by Raymond 
Cherry. Bloomington, 111., McKnight 
and McKnight, 1946. lllp. $1.20. 

26. Modern Stores; National Retail Furni- 
ture Association. Chicago, 1946. 168p. 
$2.50. The modernizing manual of the 
National Retail Furniture Association. 



113 



114 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



JANUARY 



Industry — Cone. 

27. Our Paper Mills; by Arthur A. Schmon. 
Address to newsdealers representing 35 
States at The Chicago Tribune Circu- 
lation Department Centennial Preview. 
Chicago, 1946. 14p. 

28. Welding and Brazing Alcoa Aluminum. 
Aluminum Company of America. Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., 1945. 121p. Free. 

Insurance, Social: 

29. Simpson's Retirement Security Plan. 
Robert Simpson Company Ltd., Toronto, 
1946. 34p. 

30. Retirement Plans for Public Employees. 
Municipal Finance Officers Association 
of The United States and Canada. Chi- 
cago, 1946. 36p. $1. Contains an outline 
of the basic principles governing retire- 
ment planning for public employees. 

31. Retirement System for Employees of 
R. H. Macy and Co., Inc. R. H. Macy 
and Co., Inc. New York, 1945. 90p. 
Free. 

Job Analysis: 

32. Job Evaluation and Employee Rating; 
by R. C. Smyth and M. J. Murphy. New 
York, McGraw-Hill Book Co. Inc., 1946. 
255p. $2. Presents a concise but compre- 
hensive guide to the practical application 
of job evaluation and merit rating. 

33. Job Evaluation Methods and Pro- 
cedures. Dartnell Corporation. Chi- 
cago, 1946. 88p. $5. A Dartnell survey 
of plans and methods used by plants 
and business establishments to place the 
wage structure on a more equitable 
basis. 

Labour — Unions, Politics, Etc.: 

34. American Workers Need a Labor Party; 
by Joseph Hansen. New York, Pioneer 
Publishers, 1944. 48p. 15c 

35. Education Unlimited ; a Handbook on 
Union Education in the South; by Mary 
Lawrance. Monteagle, Tenn., 1945. 45p. 
50c. 

36. How To Build Your Union. An Officers, 
Committeemen, and Stewards' Hand- 
book. Congress of Industrial Organiza- 
tions. New Orleans, 1942. 32p. 15c. 

37. A Labor Policy for America. A National 
Labor Code; by Ludwig Feller. New 
York, 1945. 334p. $3.75. 

38. Operating the Unionized Office. Office 
Management Association. New York, 
1945. 28p. 50c. 

39. Soviet Workers and Their Unions. A 
Reply to the Iron and Steel Trades' 
Confederation; by Ernest Thornton. 
London, Russia Today Society, 1946. 



Labour — Unions, Politics, Etc. — Cone. 

19p. 25c. Ernest Thornton is National 
Secretary of the Federated Ironwork- 
ers Association of Australia. 

40. Trade Union Problems; by Farrell 
Dobbs. New York, Pioneer Publishers, 
1942. 44p. 10c. 

41. World Federation. of Trade Unions; by 
J. B. S. Hardman and Joseph Paull. 
New York, Inter-Union Institute, 1945. 
16p. 25c. Report of organization, back- 
grounds, present set-up and ideological 
content based on official documents. 

42. You Voted Left; You Did Right. The 
Labour Party; Gt. Brit. London, 1946. 
14p. A record of what the Labour Party 
has done in home policy. 

Occupations: 

43. Establishing and Operating a Dry Clean- 
ing Business. U.S. Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce. Washington, 1946. 
210p. 

44. Establishing and Operating a Variety and 
General Merchandise Store; by Nelson 
A. Miller. U.S. Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce. Industrial Series 
No. 35. Washington, 1946. 256p. 

45. Establishing and Operating an Apparel 
Store; by Zelma Bondure. U.S. Bureau 
of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. 
Business Series No. 32. Washington, 1946. 
269p. 

46. Establishing and Operating an Electrical 
Appliance and Radio Shop. Prepared by 
Donald S. Parris and Associates. U.S. 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce. Industrial Series No. 28. Wash- 
ington, 1946. 199p. 

47. If You Are Considenng a Career in the 
Electrical Field; by Earle M. Morecock. 
Rochester, Rochester Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1946. ISp. 10c. 

48. Job Placement of the Physically Handi- 
capped; by Clarke D. Bridges. New 
York, 1946. 329p. S3.50. 

49. Occupations. A Selected List of Pamph- 
lets; by Gertrude Forrester. New York, 
H. W. Wilson, 1946. 240p. $2.25. 

50. Opportunities in Public Relations; by 
Shepard Henkin. New York, Vocational 
Guidance Manuals Inc., 1946. 76p. 

51. Opportunities in Radio; by Jo Ranson 
and Richard Pack. New York, Voca- 
tional Manuals, Inc., 1946. 104p. $1.50. 

52. Record Keeping for a Small Business. 
State of New York, Department of 
Commerce. Albany, 1945. 22p. Free. 

53. There's a Future for You in Air Trans- 
portation. American Airlines Inc. New 
York, 1944. 16p. Free. 



1947] 



LIBRARY OF DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



115 



Occupations — Cone. 

54. Women in Industry, Their Health and 
Efficiency; by Anna M. Buetjer. Phila- 
delphia and London, 1946. 344p. $4. 

55. Your Career in Transportation; Em- 
ployment Opportunities in Rail, High- 
way, Water and Air Transport ; by Nor- 
man V. Carlisle. New York, Dutton, 
1942. 188p. $2. 

Office Management: 

56. Planning and Preparing Office Manuals. 
Dartnell Corporation. Chicago, 111., 1946. 
73p. $5. 

57. Techniques in Developing Office Talent. 
Attitude surveys, merit rating, training, 
development of supervisors. American 
Management Association. New York, 

1945. 39p. 75c. 

58. Work Simplification. Public Administra- 
tion Service. Chicago, 1945. 49p. $1. 

Profit Sharing: 

59. Aldens Employees Profit Sharing Plan. 
Aldens, Inc. Chicago, 1946. 26p. Free. 

60. Lincoln's Incentive System; by James 
F. Lincoln. Covering the basic prin- 
ciples of the incentive system in manu- 
facturing. New York, London, McGraw- 
Hill Book Company, Inc., 1946. 192p. 
$2.75. This is more than a discussion of 
incentive plans, it is a practical manual 
on industrial management and labour 
relations. 

61. Over-Hauling Pension and Profit-Shar- 
ing Plans. American Management As- 
sociation. New York, 1946. 32p. 

Unemployment : 

62. Full Employment, How to Attain it; by 
Michael Hudson, The Christopher Pub- 
lishing House. Boston, 1946. 83p. $1.75. 
In this book Mr. Hudson offers practical 
suggestions for a current and world- 
wide problem. 

63. Full Employment in Practice; by 
J. H. G. Pierson. New York, New York 
University. Institute on Postwar Re- 
construction, 1946. 26p. 25c. 

64. Jobs, a Bulwark of Democracy ; by 
Arthur MacNamara. Ottawa, Depart- 
ment of Labour, 1946. 9p. 

United Nations: 

65. Report of the Secretary-General on the 
Work of the U.N. Organization. United 
Nations. Document No. A-65, 30 June, 

1946. New York, 1946. 66p. 

66. United Nations; by Freda White. First 
Assembly. London, United Nations As- 
sociation of Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland, 1946. London, 1946. 93p. 



United Nations — Cone. 

67. What is Unesco? United Nations Edu- 
cational, Scientific and Cultural Organi- 
zation. Ottawa, Canadian Council of 
Education for Citizenship, 1946. 15p. 

Wages : 

68. Annual Wage Plans and Some of Their 
Practical Problems; by Herman Feld- 
man. New York, 1945. 104-112p. 10c. 
Reprinted from "Advanced Manage- 
ment." 

69. The C.I.O. Case for Substantial Pay In- 
creases; by Philip Murray. Washington, 

1945. 20p. 5c. 

70. Report of the Royal Commission on 
Equal Pay, 1944-1946. Presented to Par- 
liament by Command of His Majesty. 
October, 1946. London, H.M.S.O., 1946. 
219p. 

71. Time Rates of Wages and Hours of 
Labour. Great Britain, Ministry of 
Labour and National Service. London, 

1946. 133p. Free. 

72. Incentives for Management and Work- 
ers. American Management Association, 
New York, 1945. 28p. 50c. 

73. The Wages of Farm and Factory Labor- 
ers 1914-1944; by J. D. Ahern. New 
York, Columbia University Press, 1945. 
245p. $3. 

74. Will the Guaranteed Annual Wage 
Work? National Industrial Conference 
Board Inc. New York, 1946. 44p. An 
evening with the economists. 

Miscellaneous : 

75. A Bibliography for the Recreation Lib- 
rary. Leisure and its Significance. Na- 
tional Recreation Association. New 
York, 1946. 13p. 15c. 

76. Cartels; a Study of Pros and Coris as 
They Impinge on Canada; by J. W. 
Hansen. Fort Erie, Ont., Review Com- 
pany, 1946. 32p. 

77. Community Centres; by John P. Kidd, 
Ottawa, Canadian Council of Education 
for Citizenship, 1946. 116p. Foreword 
by the Honurable Brooke Claxton. 

78. Credit Unions in Canada, 1945 ; by J. E. 
O'Meara. Canada Dept. of Agriculture. 
Economics Division. Marketing Service. 
Ottawa, 1946. 9p. 

79. Director's Report. First Item on the 
Agenda. Montreal, I.L.O., 1946. 113p. 
At head of title: Report 1. Int. Labour 
Conference. Twenty-ninth Session, 
Montreal, 1946. 



116 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[JANUARY 



Miscellaneous — Con. 
SO. The Foreman — The Job and the Alan. 
Present Status of Foremen. Labor Re- 
lations Tooles for Foremen. Incentives 
for Foremen. American Management 
Association. Production Series No. 166. 
New York, 1946. 31p. 50c. 

81. Handbook for Commission Employees. 
Washington, G.P.O., 1945. 62p. Free. 

82. The Millionnaire Press; with a Fore- 
word by Gordon Schaffer. Labour Re- 
search Department. London, 1946. 20p. 

83. The Relation between Farm Manage- 
ment Factors, Milk Cost and Operator 
Labour Earnings; by P. H. Casselman. 
Ottawa, New Era Publications, 1946. 
80p. 

84. Training Supervisors in Human Rela- 
tions. Metropolitan Life Insurance Com- 



MlSCELLANEOUS — Cone. 

pany. Policyholders Service Bureau. 
New York, 1946. 53p. Free. 

85. United States Government Manual, 
1946. First Edition (revised to May 1). 
U.S. Bureau of the Budget. Washington, 
1946. 708p. The Manual contains sec- 
tions dealing with every agency of the 
government in the legislative, executive 
and judicial branches. 

86. The Way is Forward. Twenty-Sixth An- 
nual Report of The Canadian Welfare 
Council. Canadian Welfare Council. 
Ottawa, 1946. 25p. 

87. Youth Organization in Canada. A Re- 
ference Manual by George Tuttle. Pre- 
pared for the Canadian Youth Commis- 
sion. Toronto, Ryerson Press, 1946. 
HOp. SI. 50. 



Labour and Industry in Quebec 



r F v HE annual report of the Quebec Depart- 
■*■ ment of Labour for the fiscal year 
ending March 31, 1945 summarizes the 
activities of the different Services and Com- 
missions coming under its jurisdiction, and 
gives the report of the Superior Labour 
Council and of its permanent committee. 

Industrial relations. — The labour code has 
yielded excellent results in the field of union 
recognition. The report states it has preven- 
ted a good many disputes due to the refusal 
of certain employers to bargain collectively, 
and also due to rivalry between unions. 

In all, 1.111 applications for certification 
were presented to the Industrial Relations 
Board during this first year of its existence; 
923 of these applications were approved, 
involving 79,590 employees. 

Collective Agreement Act. — There were 284 
Orders in Council passed under this Act during 
the year; 19 of these had as their object the 
ratification of orders, and 74 made amend- 
ments to orders already in force, while 25 
others prolonged specifically the original term 
of certain orders; only 4 orders were intended 
to repeal existing orders. Of the 19 new orders 
ratified during the year, 18 contained an 
automatic renewal clause, which formed part 
of the original order or was added by means 
of an amending order. 

The oldest of the 107 orders in force during 
the year under consideration was ratified on 
July 25, 1935; this order governs the hat- 
making industry for women and children. 
Pursuant to representations by the contracting 



parties, repeals were made with respect to the 
aluminum industry (Arvida, La Tuque and 
Shawinigan) and the municipal employees of 
Joliette. (Agreements under the Collective 
Agreement Act are reviewed monthly in the 
Labour Gazette). 

The report of the activities during the year 
of the inspector of the parity committees is 
also given under this heading. 

Minimum Wage Commission. — The chief 
duties of the Minimum Wage Commission 
under the Act consist of fixing minimum wage 
rates and other working conditions through 
orders, supervising the observance of the Act 
and of the orders, and attending to the 
recovery of wages when the employer does 
not pay them in full. 

The Commission upheld its orders, and in 
certain cases was able to amend them to the 
advantage of the employees. The report gives 
a list of the thirty-one orders in force in 1945, 
covering employees who did not benefit by 
collective agreements. 

The enforcement of the orders and regula- 
tions called for 6,153 inspections in the district 
of Quebec and 6,395 in the district of Montreal. 
The inspection service also co-operated with 
the Industrial Relations Board and the 
Regional War Labour Board. 

Wage claims paid to employees through the 
Minimum Wage Commission amounted to 
$21,552.08 in the district of Quebec where 
478 employers and 1.90S employees were 
involved, and to §108,177.47 in the district of 
Montreal (231 employers and 3,255 employees). 



1947 



LABOUR AND INDUSTRY IN QUEBEC 



117 



In connection with the enforcement of the 
Act and Regulations during the year ended 
March 31, 1945, legal proceedings were insti- 
tuted in one case in the district of Quebec and 
in four cases in the district of Montreal. 

The report gives also a summary of the 
activities during the fiscal year of the Fair 
Wages Officer. 

Conciliation and Arbitration. — The Con- 
ciliation and Arbitration Service attended to 
or co-operated in the enforcement during the 
year of Public Services and their Employees 
Act; the Industrial Disputes Act; the 
Industrial Relations Act; the Dominion Order 
in Council P.C. 9384, under the direction of 
the Regional War Labour Board; and the 
Dominion Order in Council P.C. 1003, under 
the direction of the Wartime Labour Relations 
Board. 

The Service intervened on twenty-three 
occasions to prevent labour disputes in public 
services, mostly between school boards and 
their employees. The Act was instrumental in 
the settlement of the disputes without strikes 
and in accordance with the principles of justice 
guaranteed by the arbitration boards. 

Eleven arbitration boards were instituted 
under the Industrial Disputes Act for the 
settlement of ordinary industrial disputes. The 
Conciliation Service prevented twenty-seven 
strikes by its intervention. 

Forty-six strikes commenced during the year, 
of which six came under Federal jurisdiction 
and forty under Provincial jurisdiction. These 
work stoppages involved 12,381 persons and 
caused a loss of 60,851 working days. Sixteen 
disputes were settled in favour of the 
employees concerned, nine in favour of the 
employers, and twelve were indefinite in 
result. 

The Service intervened in numerous cases 
referred by the Labour Relations Board 
following certifications, in order to help the 
parties negotiate a collective agreement. 

The conciliation officers have helped greatly 
in the adjustment of difficulties and in con- 
nection with the inquiries resulting from the 
enforcement of Dominion Orders in Council 
P.C. 9384 and P.C. 1003. To sum up: five 
interventions on behalf of the Regional Board 
and thirty-six inquiries on behalf of the 
Wartime Labour Relations Board concluded. 

Safety and Inspection Service. — There were 
23,451 inspections made by the inspectors in 
factories during the year, 2,675 in com- 
mercial establishments and 15,456 in public 
buildings. Of 6,215 improvements asked for in 
the industry, 4,821 were carried out. There 
were 548 improvements in the commercial 
establishments, and 4,842 of the 6,041 improve- 



ments recommended for the public buildings 
were carried out. During the year the Service 
received 544 plans for public buildings, over- 
hauling or repairing public buildings, fire- 
escapes, etc. 

The war necessitated the granting of 1,378 
overtime permits. It is estimated that these 
permits will decrease in number with the 
return of peace. The Service also inspected 
the work of boys and girls from 14 to 16: 
22,917 age and schooling certificates were 
issued in this connection, in accordance with 
the provisions of the Industrial and Com- 
mercial Establishments Act. 

The Board of Examiners of Stationary 
Enginemen issued 11,506 qualifications certi- 
ficates during the year. It also gave out 
5,942 pressure vessels' inspection certificates of 
all types. The total number of inspections 
was 11,230. 

The enforcement of the Electricians' Act 
shows that 9,856 licences of all types were 
issued during the year to electrical contractors 
and journeymen. The number of apprentices 
registered amounted to 1,689 and the total 
number of inspections of electrical equipment 
was 107,150. 

For pipe mechanics, the report points out 
that 790 licences were issued to contractors 
and 3,459 to journeymen. The inspectors have 
8,675 inspections of all types to their credit. 

Employment Service. — The 35th annual 
report of the Employment Service of the 
Province of Quebec shows a total of 106,857 
applications for work and 100,889 placements 
during the fiscal year ending March 31, 1945. 
This Service worked in close co-operation with 
National Selective Service and the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Commission. The placing of 
farm labour was the object of particular 
attention. 

Pensions and Mothers' Allowances. — The 
report reproduces the general report of the 
Old Age and Blind Pensions Commission, and 
of the Mothers' Allowances Commission, giving 
statistics, and exidence of the services rendered 
the labour and farm population by the 
Provincial system of social insurance and 
welfare work. 

Workmen's Compensation Commission. — 
The report of the Workmen's Compensation 
Commission for 1944 shows a total of 84,308 
accidents reported, which represented a reduc- 
tion of more than 6,000 from the preceding 
year. It emphasizes the fact that "the work of 
the Accident Prevention Associations and the 
co-operation they have received from the 
employers have brought about the excellent 
result obtained." 



Ottawa: Printed by Edmond Cloutier, C.M.G., B.A., L.Ph., Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty, 1947. 



in 



The Labour Gazette 

PREPARED AND EDITED BY 

The Department of Labour, Ottawa, Canada 

Minister— Hon. Humphrey Mitchell 

Deputy Minister — Arthur MacNamara, C.M.G., LL.D. 

Editor — Harry J. Walker 

Assistant Editor — John Mainwaring Circulation Manager — C. E. St. George 



Volume XLVII] 



FEBRUARY, 1947 



[Number 2 



Notes of Current Interest 



The Department of Labour 
Department and the Mining Industry 

of Labour was the subject of an 

and mining address delivered by Mr. 

industry Arthur MacNamara, Deputy 

Minister of Labour, to 
delegates attending the annual convention of 
the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metal- 
lurgy, held in Ottawa during the week of 
January 20. In it the present activities of 
the Labour Department, as they affected the 
coal mining industry, were briefly reviewed, 
with particular reference to labour relations, 
manpower and immigration. 

Mr. MacNamara stated that the lapse of 
Dominion Government controls in the field of 
labour relations and the return of jurisdiction 
to the provinces, as provided for under the 
provisions of the British North America Act, 
posed the problem of joint action by the 
Dominion and the Provinces in bringing about 
legislative conditions which will best further 
the interests of employers, workers and the 
general public. He reported that discussions 
between Dominion and provincial authorities 
had produced a substantial measure of agree- 
ment on the provisions which should be con- 
tained in any new legislation and that close 
co-operation was assured. 

Mr. MacNamara referred to the assistance 
provided employers by the Employment 
Service, which, he said, "has been developed 
into a chain of over 300 branch offices located 
at over 200 points in every province in 
Canada, linked together under a clearance 
system. 



"These offices are giving service to thou- 
sands of employers, and gave service to over 
'one million individuals in the last nine 
months. 

"Employers do not have to use the offices 
(as was the case during the war) — they could 
employ people, if they wished, direct. How- 
ever, they do use the offices because they 
find them satisfactory and because they do 
get service which they could duplicate only 
if they could establish a similar chain of 
offices." He pointed out that selection of 
suitable workers through the Service reduced 
labour costs. 

Continuing, Mr. MacNamara reported that 
requests for admittance to Canada of Poles 
and other European workers had been 
received from nearly every industry in 
Canada. "It is recognized that notwithstand- 
ing modern mechanization, there is still in the 
mining of ore an unavoidable minimum of 
work which requires hard manual labour and 
no special skill. It is also true that most 
Canadians do not lend themselves readily to 
this work. They prefer to attain skill in the 
operation of mechanical equipment. 

"In the past, the manual work has been 
ably done by men from Central Europe, 
Finland, and Poland. No doubt there are 
many more of these people who would 
welcome an opportunity to come to Canada 
and engage in this underground labour. 
Indeed, those countries could supply willing- 
workers for most of our industries." 

The whole question of immigration was 
being given a great deal of attention by the.- 



119 



80682— H 



120 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



FEBRUARY 



Government and- every consideration was 
being extended to representations of indi- 
viduals and organizations in devising "a 
sound and lasting policy on immigration 
which will 'be humanitarian and economic, and 
at the same time consistent with our inter- 
national obligations/* Mr. MacNamara told 
the convention. 

During 1946, the National 
Employment Employment Service dis- 

Service finds covered, through its more 

training-on-job than 250 local offices across 
opportunities Canada, 2,290 training-on- 

the-job opportunities in 135 
different occupations. These were turned over 
to the Canadian Vocational Training Branch 
of the Department of Labour for allocation 
to veterans who selected that form of training 
upon their return to civilian life. In cases 
where the pay did not provide a living wage, 
the Department of Veterans Affairs made 
supplementary allowances to the veterans. 

The training-on-the-j ob opportunities 
revealed by the National Employment Ser- 
vice ranged over a wide field and included 
vacancies for accountants, automobile mech- 
anics, building tradesmen, miners, machinists, 
jewellers and watch-makers, milliners, printers, 
photo-engrave,rs, salesmen and textile workers. 
Of more, unusual occupations, openings were 
found for arteraft workers, drapery makers, 
dental technicians, egg graders, embalmers, 
hammersmiths, lens grinders and silk finishers. 

The National Employment Service is con- 
tinuing to co-operate with Canadian Voca- 
tional Training and the Department of 
Veterans Affairs in bringing new training-on- 
the-j ob opportunities to the attention of 
unemployed veterans. 

The accompanying table 
Employment contains the latest statistics 

and industrial available reflecting indus- 

statistics trial conditions in Canada. 

Figures are shown for the 
three months ending January, 1947, as com- 
pared with the corresponding period ending 
in January, 1946. 

Employment and Earnings — Both industrial 
employment and payrolls showed further 
important advances at the beginning of 
December over the previous month according 
to the monthly report on employment and 
payrolls issued by the Dominion Bureau of 
Statistics. The payroll gain reflected wage 
increases as well as a higher level of 
employment. 

The genera] index of employment (base 
1926=100) at December 1, 1946, stood at 
185-4 as compared with 182-7 in the 
preceding month, and with 173-2 of December 
1, 1945. A comparison of the indexes at the 



beginning of December in 1946 and 1945, 

shows an advance of 7 per cent. 

Reports from 16,441 establishments indicated 
combined staffs of 1,899,008 at December 1, an 
increase of 27,942 from the level of the 
previous month. Payrolls for the last week 
in November totalled $64,448,019, an increase 
of 3-3 per cent from $62,367,510 for the last 
week of October. The weekly average per 
employee was $33.94 at December 1, as com- 
pared with $33.33 at November 1. Per capita 
figures at the beginning of December in 
previous years were: 1945, $31.63; 1944, 
$32.19; 1943, $31.61; 1942, $30.06 and 1941, 
$27.32. Increased wage rates in a number of 
industries and establishments together with 
greater activity in certain divisions in which 
earnings are generally above average, con- 
tributed to the increase at December 1. In 
the last twelve months, indicated payrolls 
have advanced by 14-4 per cent. 

The greatest increase in employment at the 
beginning of December was in logging, which 
provided work for an additional 13,465 persons, 
and in trade, in which there was an advance 
of 11,808. Smaller gains were noted in manu- 
facturing, mining, communications, transporta- 
tions and services but activity in con- 
struction declined. In manufacturing, the 
advance was partly due to the resumption of 
work in plants previously strike-bound. The 
most pronounced gains were in the iron and 
steel, rubber, non-ferrous metal, electrical 
apparatus and textile industries. The increases 
ranged from approximately 1,400 in the textile 
group to nearly 4,400 in the iron and steel 
group. 

Prices — The general index of wholesale 
prices, based on the 1926 average as 100, was 
111-8 in December as compared with 111-4 
in November and 103-9 in December, 1945. 
The index for vegetable products decreased 
from 97-4 in November, 1$46 to 97-2 in 
December, while an increase of 0-4 points, 
from 119-8 to 120-2, was noted in the index 
of animal products. An increase of 2-1 points 
occurred in the wood products index which 
rose from 140-9 to 143-0 due to an increase 
in the price of wood pulp. The indes of 
non-metallic minerals moved from 104-0 to 
104-7 while the index of non-ferrous metals 
declined from 89-7 to 89-3. No changes were 
noted in the indexes for textile products at 
98-4, iron products at 128-6, and chemical 
products at 95-3. The index of producers' 
goods rose from 107-9 to 108-6 while the index 
of consumers' goods declined slightly from 
103-2 to 103-1. The index of Canadian farm 
products moved from 113-4 to 113-5. 

The cost-of-living index, based on prices in 
the years 1935 to 1939 as 100, declined from 



1947] 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



121 



STATISTICS REFLECTING INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS IN CANADA 

Note. — Official statistics except where noted. Much of the statistical data in this table, with an analysis, are included 
in the Monthly Review of Business Statistics issued by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 



Classification 


1947 


1946 


1945 


January 


December 


November 


January 


December 


November 


Employment — 

Index* 




185-4 
5,628 
4,596 
2,209 

52,479 


182-7 
7,062 
6,763 
3,129 

37,111 


168-2 
7,184 
4,979 
2,254 

71,932 
3-0 

127-6 

29-92 

67-9 

38-1 

104-0 
119-9 

195-4 
193-9 
119-7 
202-8 
250-1 
151-8 
198-7 
156-3 
191-0 
203-9 
227-9 
160-0 
196-1 
217-1 

123-5 
152-1 
90-0 

331,653,000 
140,309,000 
189,090,000 

5,990,656,000 

966,100,000 

2,962,942,000 

1,173,828,000 

254,517 

27,318,000 
25,227,000 

23,309,000 
22,091,000 

4,643,721,000 

15,287,000 
27,396,000 

143,685 

244,623 

10,878 

238,450 

1,817,000 

32,021,000 

13,823,000 

34,069,000 

41,734,000 

175,883,000 
2,240,000 
3,839,000 

3,428,773,000 

81,948,000 

328,414 


173-2 
7,220 
4,795 
3,067 

57,612 


171-2 






10,083 


Vacancies notified 2 No. 




6,897 






4,725 


Unemployment insurance claims 
No. 




53,325 




1-5 




Earnings and Hours- 
Index, aggregate weekly payrolls 3 . 


159-6 

33-94 

74-5 

43-2 

111-8 
127-1 

1S6-7 
180-2 
141-6 
192-2 
183-0 
158-3 
200-2 
155-5 
176-8 
236-0 
195-5 
281-9 
212-4 
220-0 

106-4 
153-5 

85-0 

396,237,000 
181,913,000 
211,903,000 

5,935,179,000 
i,030, 762, 000 
3,469,322,000 
1,453,801,000 

274,656 


154-4 

33-33 

72-9 

42-4 

111-4 
127-1 

181-3 
180-2 
138-7 
191-5 
197-7 
154-0 
183-6 
150-0 
161-5 
204-9 
197-3 
245-4 
223-1 
256-9 

102-5 
154-7 
85-0 

433,302,000 
198,164,000 
232,219,000 

6,211,495,000 
1,042,421,000 
3,460,146,000 
1,430,543,000 

321,264 

32,495,000 
27,567,000 

26,264,000 
22,518,000 

5,267,351,000 

24,225,000 
48,004,000 

135,269 

222,644 

9,370 

231,204 

1,577,000 

35,415,000 

17,468,000 

22,679,000 

37,012,000 

288,015,000 
2,519,000 
3,566,000 

3,566,742,000 

109,679,000 

364,304 


139-5 

31-63 

67-0 

44-8 

103-3 

120-1 

193-0 
194-5 
114-0 
206-3 
235-4 
141-8 
189-8 
143-2 
167-4 
170-0 
232-8 
256-1 
187-4 
195-9 

112-5 
146-6 
92-2 

357,595,000 
121,192,000 
234,826,000 

6,084,752,000 

992,000,000 

2,865,329,000 

1,227,065,000 

249,571 

31,959,000 
26,317,000 

25,019,000 
21,802,000 

4,802,570,000 

13,541,000 
25,787,000 

135,225 

219,281 

15,456 

239,749 

1,551,000 

34,931,000 

15,276,000 

34,476,000 

40,213,000 

223,248,000 
2,169,000 
3,061,000 

3,228,710,000 

64,942,000 

276,930 


139-3 






31-95 






67-5 






44-9 


Prices- 
Wholesale index 1 




103-1 




127-0 


119-9 


Physical Volume of Business- 


189-9 






197-7 






130-6 






211-0 






201-2 






139-7 






173-7 






138-2 






156-2 






158-8 






218-2 






213-3 






200-9 






221-5 


Other Business Indicators- 


tl06-7 


107-2 




145-0 


Bond yields, Dominion, index 4 

Trade, external, excluding gold. $ 


184-7 


93-9 
383,669,000 


Imports, excluding gold $ 




142,409,000 


Exports, excluding gold $ 




238,637,000 


Bank debits to individual 




8,580,689,000 






998,600,000 






2,816,218,000 






1,314,321,000 


Railways — 
Car loadings, rev. freight cars 7 . . 
Canadian National Railways 


264,070 


295,336 
30,278,000 








25,559,000 


Canadian Pacific Railway 

traffic earnings $ 

operating expenses, all lines. $ 

Steam railways, revenue freight 




24,948,000 
21,827,000 


25,764,000 




22,439,000 




5,298,098,000 


Building permits $ 


15,396,000 


23,761,000 
36,535,000 

161,464 

237,300 

11,766 

227,469 

1,575,000 

30,328,000 

16,988,000 

26,557,000 

37,071,000 

208,286,000 
2,350,000 
3,144,000 

3,672,116,000 

96,992,000 

341,951 


18,116,000 
44,998,000 


Mineral production — 




134,651 


Steel ingots and castings. . . .tons 




207,981 




13,360 






220, 755 






1,768,000 






32,240,000 


Nickel .. lb 




15,484,000 


Lead lb 




35,000,000 


Zinc lb 




40,609,000 


Timber scaled in B.C F.B.M . 




242,891,000 
2,285,000 






3,655,000 


Output of central electric 




3,236,986,000 
76,137,000 






299, 160 









t Week ended January 30, 1947. 

i Base 1926 = 100. 2 Daily averages. 3 Base June, 1941 = 100. * Base, 1935-1939 = 100. 

necessary, for seasonal variation. 6 Notes in the hands of the public at the end of the month, 

ended January 25, 1947, and corresponding previous periods. 



5 Adjusted, where 
Figures for four weeks 



122 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[FEBRUARY 



127-1 at December 2, 1946, to 127-0 for 
January 2, 1947. Substantial declines in eggs 
and citrus fruits were mainly responsible for 
this small decrease in the general index. 
Other foods showed a little change in price 
and the food index fell from 146-4 to 145-5. 
A reduction in the fuel gas index caused the 
fuel and light series to drop from 109-2 to 
109-0. Other changes were all upward by 
small amounts. Clothing advanced from 
131-2 to 131-5, home furnishings and services 
from 129-4 to 129-8, and miscellaneous items 
from 114-1 to 114-7. Rents remained at 
113-4. The advance in the general index 
since August, 1939, was 26-0 per cent. 

The Prime Minister on 
Statement on January 24, 1947, issued a 

Japanese statement on Japanese 

policy policy. He recalled his 

statement of August 4, 
1944, on this matter and explained how it had 
been put into effect in the last two and a 
half years. 

Nearly 4,000 persons of Japanese origin 
had gone to Japan voluntarily with Govern- 
ment assistance, including those who might 
have required deportation. As a result, the 
Government had decided to repeal the Orders 
in Council authorizing deportation, revocation 
of naturalization, and establishment of a 
Commission to investigate loyalty. Continued 
Government assistance will, however, be given 
to those Japanese wishing to go to Japan of 
their own free will. 

While the Government considers that prop- 
erty of the evacuated Japanese in the coastal 
protected zone was sold by the Custodian at 
a fair price, it is prepared to review cases 
where it can be shown that there may have 
been injustice. 

Although 22,096 persons of Japanese origin 
resided in British Columbia in 1941, only 6,776 
or less than one-third, remained there in 
January, 1947; 13,782 were living in other 
provinces on a widely distributed basis. This 
resettlement has been accomplished under the 
supervision of the Japanese Division of the 
Department of Labour, and with Government 
assistance toward transportation and resettle- 
ment costs. 

To ensure the success of the re-establish- 
ment of the Japanese from British Columbia, 
the Government is continuing certain restric- 
tions on movement and on issuance of fishing 
licences, and controls necessary to complete 
the administration of assets already vested in 
the Custodian. All other controls, including 
registration of Japanese and licensing of prop- 
erty purchases, have been revoked. 



Immigrant arrivals in 
Increase in Canada during the six 

immigration months ending September 

to Canada 30, 1946, totalled 46,254, 

according to the Depart- 
ment of Mines and Resources. While the 
number was greatly in excess of the figure 
for any year since 1930 (e.g., 1938, 17,244; 
1942, 7,576; 1945, 22,722), the increase is 
largely accounted for by the movement to 
Canada of dependents of service men. This 
is borne out by the fact that the number 
included 27,477 adult females and 14,100 
children under 18. 

A total of 34,578 immigrants came from 
the British Isles; 6,677 were from the United 
States; 3,732 were from the Northern 
European races; and 1,277 were from other 
races. 

Classified by occupation, the immigrants 
were grouped as follows: — 

Males Females Children 

Farming 576 225 283 

Labouring 590 173 123 

Mechanics 1,231 336 221 

Trading 1,154 750 • 366 

Mining 27 6 3 

Female Domestic 

Servants — 282 42 

Other Classes ... 1,099 25,705 13,062 

Hon. James Glen, Minister 
Immigration of Mines and Resources, 

regulations recently announced in the 

broadened House of Commons that 

the regulations governing 
immigration, amended in May, 1946 (L.G., 
June, 1946, p. 716), have been further broad- 
ened to include four new admissible classes. 
The Minister explained that these changes 
would have the major effect of permitting 
the admission for farm settlement of agricul- 
tural people with very limited, capital and 
with relatives in Canada who were in a 
position to establish them on farms, and 
would also allow the entry of labour for 
farms and basic industries such as lumbering, 
logging and mining. 
The new classes are as follows: — 

1. The widowed daughter or sister (with or 
without unmarried children under 18 years of 
age) of a legal resident of Canada who is 
in a position to receive and care for such 
relatives. 

2. An agriculturist entering Canada to farm 
when destined to a father, father-in-law, son, 
son-in-law, brother, brother-in-law, uncle or 
nephew engaged in agriculture as his principal 
occupation, who is in a position to receive 
such immigrant and establish him on a farm. 



1947] 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



123 



3. A farm labourer entering Canada to 
engage in assured farm employment. 

4. A person experienced in mining, lumber- 
ing or logging entering Canada to engage in 
assured employment in any one of such 
industries. 

The Annual Report of 
Administration Proceedings under the 
of Combines Combines Investigation Act 

Investigation for the fiscal year ended 

Act in 1946 March 31, 1946, was tabled 

in the House of Commons 
by the Minister of Justice on January 31, 
1947. The report contains a summary of the 
findings, conclusions and recommendations of 
"Canada and International Cartels", an inquiry 
into the nature and effects of international 
cartels and other trade combinations which 
was undertaken by the Commissioner of 
Combines on instructions from the Minister 
of Labour given in May, 1944, and trans- 
mitted to the Minister of Justice on October 
10, 1945 (L.G., Nov., 1945, p. 1614). Respon- 
sibility for the administration of the Combines 
Investigation Act was transferred, as of 
October 1, 1945, from the Minister of Labour 
to the Minister of Justice. 

The annual report also gives a brief review 
of the work of the Commission during the 
fiscal year in connection with the administra- 
tion of the Combines Investigation Act. 
Inquiries carried on during the year related to 
a number of different trades and industries 
and involved activities of organized groups as 
well as practices engaged in by individual 
firms. 

In this connection the report states: "The 
imminent or actual withdrawal of many 
governmental wartime restrictions led trade 
associations in a number of instances to con- 
sider the introduction of various forms of 
co-operative activity on a voluntary basis. In 
several cases where possible conflict with 
combines legislation might have arisen repre- 
sentatives of trade associations have discussed 
their tentative plans with the Commission 
and have avoided the adoption of restrictive 

I policies which might have been questioned. 
"Organized groups in several distributive 
trades were found to have in active prepara- 
tion programs of joint activity which included 
objectives such as the adoption of uniform 
selling prices and other restrictions on com- 
petition. Inquiries which were undertaken in 
regard to the nature and possible effect of 
such arrangements were still in progress at 
the end of the year. In dealing with such 
matters and those referred to in the para- 
graph immediately preceding, much may be 
accomplished in a preventive way where the 
organizations concerned are prepared to discuss 



their tentative programs in the light of the 
need for the maintenance of competitive con- 
ditions and to see that the public interest 
therein is not likely to be prejudiced by the 
policies which may be adopted." 

The report refers also to the dismissal of 
an appeal to the Judicial Committee of the 
Privy Council by the City of Toronto claim- 
ing fines of $176,000 paid by convicted 
members of combines in the manufacture and 
sale of corrugated shipping containers and 
related products. 

Implementation of the recommendations 
made in "Canada and International Cartels" 
in regard to organization of staff was pro- 
ceeded with during the year and consideration 
given to determine what other steps should 
be taken to provide for the most effective 
application of the legislation. The report 
comments as follows on this matter: "It 
became increasingly evident during the inquiry 
which was made into private business agree- 
ments that serious restraints on trade may 
develop out of arrangements which, in so far 
as they become apparent to the public, may 
bear an appearance of innocent protection of 
private interests but which when fully dis- 
closed are found to be restrictive to an 
injurious degree. The protection of the public 
interest in the maintenance of competition in 
those fields where it must remain an essential 
element if private enterprise is to function 
effectively will require closer and more 
critical examination of trade practices and 
conditions than was applied in the pre-war 
period." 

"A recent sample survey shows 
Results of that the physically handicapped 

survey of worker in Canadian industry 

handicapped is proving himself as efficient 
workers as those with no physical 

handicaps," it was stated by 
Hon. Humphrey Mitchell, Minister of Labour, 
in announcing the results of a survey of phys- 
ically handicapped workers, carried out by the 
National Employment Service in late 1946. 
The sample covered 467 Canadian firms em- 
ploying 2,315 workers classified as "handi- 
capped personnel." 

The Minister added that the evidence se- 
cured in the survey bore out the contention 
of the officers of the National Employment 
Service concerned with the placement of dis- 
abled workers, that physical handicaps are not 
necessarily vocational handicaps. 

The survey was made during 1946 when 
physically fit workers were available for many 
types of work. The fact that firms had not 
only retained their physically handicapped 
employees, but in many instances had engaged 
other workers with disabilities, was the best 



124 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[FEBRUARY 



testimony to their work ability,, the Minister 
said. 

The firms which were covered by the survey 
are located in 48 centres across Canada, and 
employ a total of 2.315 handicapped persons, 
either male or female, of whom about one- 
half are handicapped veterans. 

The work records of these 2.315 physically 
handicapped persons show that the great ma- 
jority of them do as much work as, or more, 
than the average normal employee on the 
same type of job. A total of 313, or 13-5 per 
cent, are reported to have a lower output than 
the physically fit workers. However, 1,783, 
or 77 per cent of them, are said to turn out 
the same amount of work, as the fit person, 
while 219, or 9-5 per cent of the surveyed, do 
more work than the fit worker. 

The attendance records reveal that only a 
small percentage of the handicapped have a 
higher absentee rate than the usual worker, 
and this group actualfy has fewer unexcused 
absences than the fit worker. Those who were 
absent more often than the physically fit 
totalled 192 or 8-3 per cent; f .olo, or 65-4 
per cent, had equally as favourable an attend- 
ance record as the physically fit; and 60S. or 
26-3 per cent, had lower absentee rates than 
the physically fit. 

On the evidence of the survey, it would seem 
that these 2.315 handicapped emplo}*ees were, 
on the whole, less likely to be involved in 
occupational accidents. Experience showed 
that only 42, or 1-8 per cent, of them had a 
higher accident rate; 1.356, or 58-6 per cent, 
had an accident record equal to that of the 
prrysically fit; while 917, or 39-6 per cent, had 
fewer accidents than the physically fit. 

The survey also showed that there was a 
considerably lower turnover of labour among 
handicapped workers. 

All the various disability tj-pes (hearing, 
heart, orthopaedic, chest, visual, multiple 
handicaps, stomach, etc.) were represented in 
the survey which indicates that the physically 
disabled from a performance standpoint, gen- 
erally speaking, are: efficient from the em- 
ployer's viewpoint; have a sound attitude to- 
wards their job; have a good morale; have on 
the whole an excellent record in such matters 
as output, attendance and accidents; and are 
highly regarded by their employers. 

The Special Placements Division of the 
National Employment Service is developing 
its facilities to give specialized attention to 
fitting the physically handicapped into jobs, 
and is now functioning through all Local Em- 
ployment Offices of National Employment 
Service. 



The Industrial Production 
Quarterly report Co-operation Board report- 
of Industrial ing on its activities for the 

Production quarter ending December 

Co-operation 31, 1946, announced the 

Board establishment of 53 new 

labour-management produc- 
tion committees during the period under 
review. It was also reported that 20 commit- 
tees had ceased to function during the period. 
Of the 53 additions 33 were Canadian National 
Railways Maintenance of Wa}' Committees 
and of the deletions 15 were coal mine com- 
mittees in the Nova Scotia and New Bruns- 
wick territories. These changes brought the 
total number of committees of which the 
Board had record to 500. 

It was stated in the report that arrange- 
ments had been made for active collaboration 
with the United Aline Workers of America, 
District 50, in promoting labour-management 
production committees in plants with which 
the union had collective agreements. Favour- 
able results were also reported in discussions 
with management and union representatives 
over the possibility of setting up a committee 
in the Ford Motor Company plant in 
Windsor. 

The appointment of Mr. F. B. 
Appointment Kilbourn as controller of the 
of steel business, undertaking, affairs 

controller and operations of the three 

terminated companies involved in the 

steel strike of last summer has 
been terminated by Order in Council P.C. 401 
of February 3, 1947. 

The Wartime Labour Rela- 
Applications for tions Board (National) re- 
certification to ceived 128 applications for 
Wartime Labour certification of bargaining 
Relations Board representatives during 1946. 
Certification was granted in 
75 of the cases while 19 applications were 
rejected. In addition one was referred to a 
Provincial Board for disposition and 31 were 
withdrawn or were placed in abeyance at the 
request of the applicants as of December 31, 
1946. 

During the period 30 representation votes 
were ordered. 

Action upon appeals from decisions of Pro- 
vincial Labour Relations Boards resulted in 
30 appeals being upheld by the National 
Board and 73 being denied. 

Provincial Boards received 1.621 applications 
for certification during the year, granted 1.174 
and rejected 215. Representation votes were 
ordered in 145 cases. British Columbia re- 
ceived the greatest number of applications 
S68. of which 608 were granted and 96 re- 



1947] 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



125 



jected. Ontario had 448 applications of which 
322 were granted and 89 were rejected. Of 
the other provinces Manitoba received 147 
applications, Quebec 73, Nova Scotia 51, New 
Brunswick 29 and Saskatchewan 5. 

One million and a half Cana- 
Family dian families received family 

allowance allowance payments during 

payments in December, 1946, in respect of 
December three and a half million chil- 

dren. The average allowance 
per family was $13.79, and the total amount 
paid was $20,651,154. The average number of 
children per family was 2-31. 

With a view to drawing the 
Annual attention of all Canadians to 

Health Week the importance of maintaining 
observed and improving the nation's 

health, the Health League of 
Canada sponsors National Health Week. This 
year it was observed February 2 to 8 and 
the special National Social Hygiene Day on 
February 5. 

Official Departments of Education and 
Health co-operated and much useful informa- 
tion was made available by radio and through 
the newspapers and magazines. 

A guaranteed annual wage 
Guaranteed wage plan which permits (the 
established in company to offset pay- 

U.S. packing ments for itime not worked 

company with employee earnings 

for overtime has been 
established in two divisions of the Tobin 
Packing Company Inc. of Iowa. It covers 
800 workers of the United Packinghouse 
Workers (CIO). 

The provision for offsetting payments for 
time not worked is intended to reduce the 
company's liability which may occur in view 
of the highly seasonal nature of the meat 
packing industry. 

The plan guarantees employees who have 
worked either 44 weeks or 250 days since 
January 1, 1945, 52 weeks of employment a 
year at 40 hours a week. Each employee 
receives straight time weekly pay for 40 
hours. Time worked in excess of 40 hours 
during any week is credited at time and a 
half to a separate account set up for each 
employee. Straight time for those hours below 
40 a week not worked is debited to the account. 
Every 13 weeks the account is balanced and 
if credits exceed debits the employee receives 
the difference. If debits exceed credits he 
receives nothing. Previous balances do not 
Carry over to succeeding periods. 
80682—2 



In line with a recommenda- 
Conciliation tion of the Labour-manage- 

panel established ment Advisory Committee 
in U.S. of the United States Con- 

ciliation Service, (L.G. 
Jan., 1947, p. 10') Edgar L. Warren, director 
of the Service, recently announced the 
appointment of a panel of 25 labour-relations 
experts, drawn from public, private and 
academic fields, to serve as special conciliators 
in industrial disputes. 

It is expected that the panel members, 
who will leave their regular work when 
required for mediation work, will be assigned 
to disputes on the basis of their background 
and experience in handling problems of specific 
industries or areas in which the dispute has 
arisen. 

In efforts to' further expand its effective- 
ness, the Conciliation Service has convened 
a labour-management assembly for the mid- 
Atlantic states. It is an experiment aimed 
at improving labour relations on an area 
basis. The assembly is composed of ten mem- 
bers representing labour, chosen equally from 
the CIO and the AFL, and ten representing 
management. Their function is to hold regu- 
lar meetings to review the work of federal 
conciliators in the area and assist in the 
mediation of disputes. In disputes which 
occur in vital industries the assembly may 
recommend that the parties submit their dif- 
ferences to a special emergency board author- 
ized to make recommendations. 

In Pennsylvania the rejec- 
Unemployment tion of a job offered in an 
benefits denied openshop rendered an em- 
when open shop ployee ineligible for unem- 
em ploy ment ployment benefit, the Penn- 

refused sylvania Supreme Court 

recently ruled. This re- 
vised an earlier decision of a lower court which 
sanctioned payment of unemployment benefits 
under such conditions. 

Under the state compensation law an em- 
ployee is ineligible for benefit if he refuses 
to accept suitable work when offered. How- 
ever, work is deemed unsuitable when "as 
a condition of employment" the employee 
would have to join a company union or 
resign from or refrain from joining a bona 
fide labour organization. The contention of 
the employee in the case under review had 
been that his union rules forbade acceptance 
of the employment. 

The question before the Court was whether 
the possibility of expulsion from the union in 
this case constituted a condition of employ- 
ment such that the worker might be permitted 



126 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[FEBRUARY 



to reject the job without suffering loss of 
benefit. 

The Court construed the law as applicable 
only to situations in which the "condition" 
as the union membership is imposed by the 
employer when the offer of employment is 
made. It held that "great violence" would 
be done "to the clear and unequivocal word- 
ing of the statute to hold that a labour or 
any other organization can control payments 
of unemployment benefits to its members 
by merely forbidding them to work at wages 
less than those set by it, or with certain 
persons, or at certain places, or under certain 
conditions". 

During the year October, 
Employment 1945 — October, 1946, when 

statistics demobilization was taking 

in U.S.A. place in the United States, 

the civilian labour force 
increased from 53 million to 59 million per- 
sons, according to the Bureau of the Census 
sample monthly report on the labour force. 
Over the same period unemployment increased 
from li million to a peak of 2,710,000 in 
March, 1948, and subsequently declined to 
slightly le9s than 2 million in October, at 
which date one out of every two unemployed 
men was a veteran. Civilian employment 
rose from 52 to 57 million during the year, 
and the total labour force (military and 
civilian) declined from 64 to 61 million. 

Unemployment insurance statistics compiled 
by the Social Security Administration at 
Washington indicate that the peak of idle- 
ness caused by the shift from a war to a 
peace economy was reached in January, 1946, 
when 1,624,300 workers drew $133,246,000 in 
unemployment insurance. By September, the 
number of unemployed had fallen to 839.000 
and insurance payments amounted to $63,- 
215,000. November payments were given as 
approximately $56,500,000. 

A survey has recently been 
Placement of made by the Bureau of 

handicapped Labour Statistics at Wash- 

workers in ington, on "the output, 

United States injury frequency, absentee- 

ism and labour turnover of 
the impaired worker as compared to the able- 
bodied worker". 

Of the 88,600 impaired workers employed 
in 450 establishments surveyed by the Bureau, 
83 per cent were reported to be as efficient as 
the unimpaired doing similar work, seven per 
cent were reported as more efficient and ten 
per cent were reported as less efficient. 

Of the 450 establishments studied, 61 per 
cent reported that job applicants were given 
pre-employment physical examinations, but 
that they were not placed on the basis of 



job analysis, and fifteen per cent reported job 
analysis programs. 

In the opinion of the Bureau's investigators 
it was not necessary for small concerns to 
employ a full-time medical examiner and a 
special placement officer for physically im- 
paired workers: "A fair examination made by 
a competent industrial physician should give 
the employer the information necessary to 
place the impaired worker satisfactorily". But 
it was considered important that the physician 
should examine the disabled veteran with an 
eye to selective placement rather than rejec- 
tion for a job, due regard being had for the 
applicant's training, experience and abilities. 

Large plants that maintain full-time medi- 
cal departments are naturally in a more 
favourable position in carrying out selective 
placements. It is stated that many of the 
larger employers of labour co-operate with 
the United States Veterans Administration 
in the rehabilitation of disabled veterans 
through training-on-the-job and in suggesting 
suitable courses at trade or vocational schools. 

It was the opinion of the investigators that, 
given carefully supervised selective place- 
ments, based on the impaired workers' abil- 
ities rather than their disabilities, the pro- 
duction efficiency record of impaired workers 
was slightly superior to that of unimpaired 
workers. The efficiency relative for impaired 
workers was 102 compared with 100 for un- 
impaired. Bureau of Labour officials in Wash- 
ington stated that the high productivity 
record of the disabled might be due to more 
careful placements, more earnest attitudes on 
their part, or a combination of both. 

The accident frequency rate for impaired 
workers was placed at 8-3 injuries per 1,000,000 
man-hours worked, compared with 11*8 injuries 
for unimpaired workers. However, non- 
disabling injury rates were slightly higher for 
impaired than for unimpaired workers. 

Awareness of the import- 
Brochure on ance of personnel factors 
industrial in labour-management rela- 
personnel tions has become increas- 
relations ingly evident in recent 

years. 
A study of some of the varied and often 
complex problems involved in industrial per- 
sonnel relations, designed to aid manage- 
ment, particularly in the reconversion period 
has recently been published by Industrial Rela- 
tions Counsellors Inc., R.K.O. Building. Rocke- 
feller Centre, New York. The 70-page 
brochure, "Reconversion in Industrial Rela- 
tions", highlights the probable developments 
in industrial relations during the next few years 
in relation to present economic trends and 



1947] 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



127 



the policies of government, labour and 
management. It thus affords perspective of 
the entire field, rather than exhaustive treat- 
ment of particular areas. 

It is pointed out that reconversion in 
management policy and in the procedures 
affecting relations with employees has only 
begun. Also, that it is a more difficult under- 
taking than physical reconversion, since it is 
concerned with people, not machines and 
materials. The task involves coping with new 
habits and attitudes, confused motives and 
divided loyalties acquired during the war. 

A study on eyestrain in in- 
New Zealand dustry, conducted recently by 
study on the Industrial Psychology Di- 

eyestrain vision of the New Zealand 

in industry Department of Scientific and 

Industrial Research, indicated 
that a high percentage of factory workers 
suffered from eyestrain. 

The report of the study, published in the 
Division's quarterly bulletin, states that the 
results were roughly in line with those ob- 
tained in similar studies in the United States. 
Of 241 girls examined, 37 per cent in one 
factory and 46 per cent in the other com- 
plained of some degree of eyestrain. The in- 
vestigators did not study the relationship 
between eyestrain and productive efficiency, 
but stated their belief that eye fatigue dimin- 
ished productive efficiency and also had ad- 
verse effects on the worker. 

The following tentative recommendations 
were made: — 

"1. A standardized examination, both for 
candidates for employment and for those 
already engaged in trades involving close 
visual work, is theoretically desirable. By 
this means it is possible to eliminate those 
whose vision is not up to the required standard 
for close work, and who would be better 
employed in some other capacity (both to 
their own and the employer's advantage), to 
detect defects which require lens assistance 
before they develop to a serious degree, and 
to check the spectacles of those who already 
have them. These measures need not be 
expensive (in Great Britain under a scheme 



devised by the British Joint Council of Quali- 
fied Opticians, employees are given a complete 
routine examination for a standard fee of 5/.), 
and would be more than offset by the savings 
in absenteeism through the ill-effects of eye- 
strain, spoiled work, labour turnover, etc. 

"For the best results examinations should 
be made: 

"(a) Before the candidate for employment 
is engaged. 

"(b) At regular intervals (as a check against 
defects which may develop, and as a check 
for correct adjustment of spectacles where 
these are worn). 

"(c) By an optician who is familiar with 
the conditions obtaining in the factory, and 
preferably in the factory itself where the con- 
ditions may be vastly different from those of 
the optician's consulting room. 

"2. The importance of providing adequate 
lighting for operations involving fine work 
cannot be over-emphasized. 

"Adequate lighting involves a consideration 
of the amount of illumination at the work 
point, as well as the general illumination. 
Factors such as colour of reflecting surfaces; 
glare; colour contrasts of materials, machin- 
ery, walls; reflections from moving parts, etc., 
all play a large part in the efficiency of the 
lighting system. 

"3. In view of the part played by psycho- 
logical factors in fatigue and eyestrain, atten- 
tion should be paid to all matters which may 
affect the morale of employees, and their 
interest in, and adjustment to, their work." 

Erratum 

The fraternal delegates from the Trades and 
Labour Congress of Canada and the American 
Federation of Labour to the 1946 Convention 
of the British Trades Union Congress were 
erroneously reported in the December issue 
of the Labour Gazette (p. 1712) as being 
Messrs. John Noble and George Meany 
respectively. 

The TLC was actually represented by Mr. 
William McGruther, President of the Civil 
Service Association of Alberta, and the AFL 
by Messrs. Kennedy and Brown. 



80682— 2 1 



Timing of Public Investment in Construction 
National Reserve of Public Projects as a Factor in Stabilizing Employment 



IN a paper presented to the Peterboro 
Branch of the Engineering Institute of 
Canada on January 23, Mr. H. W. Lea, Co- 
ordinator of Public Projects, Department of 
Reconstruction and Supply, described an im- 
portant aspect of government employment 
planning under the title Timing of Public 
Investment in Construction. The text of Mr. 
Lea's paper follows. 



In common with other nations of the world, 
Canada has, in the past, experienced a recur- 
rent series of expansions and contractions in 
national activity. To most individuals this 
has meant there have been times when 
employment opportunities at relatively good 
wages were plentiful, followed by periods of 
job scarcity, and of low wage levels. 

For many years general opinion held that 
development of these alternate peaks and 
depressions in national production was 
extremely difficult to control, and no serious 
and wide-spread attempt was made to cope 
with the situation. However, by reason of 
gradual change of viewpoint it has now come 
to be widely held that means are available at 
least to limit in degree variations in national 
activity, and that actions can be taken to 
smooth out in some measure those fluctuations 
not susceptible to control. 

This discussion is concerned with description 
of a method designed to assist in stabilization 
of national production, which takes the form 
of the timing of public investment in con- 
struction. Specific reference will be made to 
the process of assembling a national reserve 
of fully planned public projects, all items of 
which can be made available at short notice 
for immediate execution should conditions 
make this desirable. Particular attention is 
directed to the fact that operation of a policy 
of timing the execution of public projects is 
not expected by itself to arrest a sharp drop 
in national production with consequent low 
employment and income, but is merely one 
of a number of remedial actions available for 
use. 

Methods of Maintaining Employment 

There are many factors affecting national 
employment and income which have a direct 
bearing on our national wellbeing, and are 
therefore of importance and interest to every 



member of the engineering profession. A com- 
prehensive outline of the problem will be 
found in a statement made in the House of 
Commons in April 1945 by the Right Honour- 
able C. D. Howe, Minister of Reconstruction 
and Supply, which was later published under 
the title "Employment and Income" 1 . 
Although those points in the statement which 
related to the early period of reconversion 
are no longer a matter of future concern, 
attention is drawn to the sections dealing 
with sources of employment and income and 
the means of safeguarding the continuation 
of "full employment", which are timely and 
informative. 

It will be useful to refer here to two pas- 
sages from this statement on "Employment 
and Income". The definitions contained in 
these passages indicate the part to be played 
by the timing of public investment in con- 
struction, in relation to other policies designed 
to maintain "full emplo3 r ment". The first 
quotation, which follows, classifies the four 
broad types of national expenditure. 

"Remunerative employment and income in 
any economy are provided by the expenditures 
which are made. These expenditures are best 
classified according to the channels through 
which the expenditures flow, viz., (a) export 
trade, in which the decision to spend is made 
outside the country; (&) private investment 
in plant, equipment and other durable goods 
and goods in stock, in which the decision is 
governed largely by prospective earnings in 
relation to cost; (c) consumption expendi- 
tures, the level of which is mainly depend- 
ent on the level of incomes; (d) public 
investment in useful works for improving the 
productiveness of resources, and the wel- 
fare and opportunities of the people. Public 
expenditures for current goods and services 
also provide employment, but cannot to any 
large degree be determined with reference to 
the needs of employment, except in terms of 
reasonable stability. In maintaining a high 
and stable level of employment and income, 
the Government proposes to use appropriate 
means to influence expenditures in all these 
channels with particular emphasis on those 
which are most susceptible of encouragement 
and control". 

The second quotation, which follows, pro- 
vides a breakdown into its constituent parts 
of the fourth general classification of expendi- 
tures; that on public investment in useful 
works. 

"In relation to employment and income, 
government expenditures are of three sorts: 
(1) current expenditures for goods and 

1L.G., 1945, p. 616. 



128 



PUBLIC INVESTMENT IN CONSTRUCTION 



129 



services, whose amount has to be determined 
by the current need for government services 
and operations rather than varied according 
to the need for employment; (2) transfer 
payments, such as pensions, allowances and 
similar payments, which have their effect 
on employment as they re-appear as private 
expenditures; (3) public capital or invest- 
ment expenditures for buildings, equipment, 
roads, airfields and other durable develop- 
ments and improvements. The last are, to a 
degree, capable of being timed so as to 
contribute to employment as needed and 
supplement private expenditures and com- 
pensate for their fluctuations". 

Our specific interest is here restricted to 
consideration of the third classification 
mentioned. 



Requisites for a Timing Program 

Effective application of a policy of timing 
of public investment requires a means of 
ascertaining when public investment needs to 
be increased or decreased, and of insuring 
that it can be expanded when necessary. 
Three Branches of the Department of Recon- 
struction and Supply, known respectively as 
Economic Research, Resources Development, 
and Public Projects, are directly concerned 
with these matters. 

The functions of the Economic Research 
Branch are to collect and interpret statistical 
and economic material needed for reconstruc- 
tion purposes; to assist other branches of this 
and other departments in matters of economic 
policy relative to reconstruction problems, 
and to develop information in order to pre- 
pare forecasts of economic conditions in 
Canada. 

The functions of the Resources Develop- 
ment Branch are to advise in all matters con- 
nected with the development and conservation 
of natural resources; as the representative of 
the department to consult with the basic 
resources industries, and to co-ordinate the 
efforts of the Department of Reconstruction 
and Supply and other government departments 
and agencies responsible for the direction and 
supervision of such projects required during 
the reconstruction period. 

The functions of the Public Projects Branch 
are to collect and register a reserve of public 
projects, to administer the operations of the 
reserve, and in cases where public authorities 
are unable to secure engineering advice, to 
prepare* plans and specifications enabling pub- 
lic projects to be registered. 

Assembling a Reserve of Public Projects 

The national reserve of public projects is 
made up of a register of proposed construction 
for which detail plans, specifications and esti- 



mates have been prepared, and for which sites 
are available. Among the responsibilities of 
the Public Projects Branch are those of scrut- 
inizing or "screening" each item put forward 
for registration in the reserve, in order to 
advise whether execution of the item will be of 
national benefit, and is susceptible to timing, 
and in such case, to compile an estimate of the 
employment opportunities which it will 
provide. 

The general procedure being followed in 
assembling the reserve of Dominion public 
projects is that detail plans and specifications 
fof each one, together with any other pertinent 
information, are sent forward by the sponsor- 
ing department to the Department of Recon- 
struction and Supply, and referred to the 
Public Projects Branch of the Department. A 
senior officer of the Branch then inspects the 
material for the purpose of establishing 
whether the project is appropriate for incor- 
poration in the reserve. Members of the 
engineering staff of the Branch having been 
assigned, some time ago, to provide liaison 
with all sponsoring departments of the Federal 
Government, it has been found that this inspec- 
tion need be only a check, since eligibility of 
the project for consideration has been carefully 
examined beforehand with appropriate depart- 
mental officers. The project is then referred to 
the estimating division of the Branch, where 
quantities are checked, and a list of the major 
items of raw and manufactured materials of 
construction is prepared. An estimate is then 
made of both the on-site and off-site man 
hours of labour required for the completion of 
the undertaking, including labour required for 
transportation. 

The results are then reported by the Depart- 
ment of Reconstruction and Supply to the 
Cabinet Committee on Reconstruction for 
decision with respect to registration of the 
undertaking. The Cabinet Committee on 
Reconstruction consists of a group of Ministers 
of the Crown to which the Government has 
assigned general policy supervision of recon- 
struction and reconversion matters, including, 
naturally, that of the public projects reserve. 
On receipt of approval of this Cabinet Com- 
mittee, the project is formally registered in 
the reserve of public projects, attaching thereto 
a set of the detail plans and specifications, as 
well as a copy of the information prepared by 
the Public Projects Branch with respect to 
materials and labour. 

It is the responsibility of the sponsoring 
department, should any major change be made 
in plans or specifications while the project 
remains in the reserve, to advise the Depart- 
ment of Reconstruction and Supply, without 
delay, so that the Public Projects Branch may 



130 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



FEBRUARY 



amend the record as required. This procedure 
assures that the reserve shall at all times 
consist of items on which construction may be 
begun immediately a decision to do so is 
reached. A sponsoring department may request 
the removal of an item from the reserve when 
established departmental policy makes this 
action desirable. If such request were to 
enable the item to be included in annual esti- 
mates, this could be done only upon recom- 
mendation of the Cabinet Committee on 
Reconstruction, followed by approval of the 
Treasury Board and of Parliament. 

The forecasting procedures being developed 
by the Economic Research Branch will provide 
advance information regarding an impending 
recession in employment and will enable an 
estimate to be made of the increase in public 
investment in construction deemed necessary 
over a specified period of time in order to 
relieve the situation. Thus, it will then be 
possible to refer to the reserve of public pro- 
jects and to select such items as will be most 
effective in meeting the situation, from the 
point of view of regional distribution, of types 
of labour required, and of materials of 
construction. 

Continuing shortages of various types of 
materials of construction and, in most areas, of 
labour, have required retention of wartime 
restriction on public construction by federal 
departments to projects of immediate urgency. 
The Public Projects Branch has therefore been 
delegated to assess each construction item in 
annual departmental estimates from the point 
jf view of materials and labour requirements 
currently in short supply. Thus, in giving 
consideration to construction items in the 
annual estimates, the government has informa- 
tion not only with respect to the urgency of 
each proposal, but also with respect to the 
degree of interference with the national high 
priority housing and industrial program result- 
ant upon construction of each project, since in 
examination of the proposals the Branch pre- 
pares an estimate of the materials and labour 
needs of each project. The Priorities and 
Economic Research Branches of the Depart- 
ment augment this with current information 
on national and local supply positions. 

Much preparatory work had to be under- 
taken leading to development of suitable and 
practical procedures, and consequently the 
actual assembly of reserve projects was 
started less than six months ago. The reserve, 
including items now in process of screening by 
the Branch, consists of 96 projects, estimated 
to cost approximately thirty-five million 
dollars. The potential reserve may be said to 
consist of those projects which have been 
considered by sponsoring departments, and on 



which there is agreement that future construc- 
tion would be in the national interest and 
would be a Dominion responsibility. There are 
more than 1,000 such projects roughly esti- 
mated to cost at least seven hundred million 
dollars. 

Acute national shortage of technical per- 
sonnel is a serious obstacle to growth of the 
reserve to proportions necessary to bolster 
employment if a depression should occur. All 
government departments responsible for plan- 
ning are short of engineering staff, and since 
private industry is still seeking engineers with 
similar training and experience, it does not 
appear that the situation will be soon relieved. 
The Wartime Bureau of Technical Personnel 
has done, and is doing, most effective work in 
keeping government departments advised of 
potential employees, but there are obviously 
not nearly enough of these. Nevertheless, 
tangible progress is being made with assembly 
of a reserve, and it is felt that it will have 
reached significant proportions before heavy 
withdrawals become necessary. 

Provincial and Municipal Investment 

Up to this point, consideration has been 
given to public investment in Dominion 
Government construction exclusively. Records 
indicate that in the past, provincial and muni- 
cipal investment in construction combined 
have been, on the average, more than double 
that of federal investment. Obviously much 
of this non-federal investment is also suscep- 
tible to timing along the lines adopted by the 
Dominion authorities. While it is impossible 
to predict the degree to which provincial and 
municipal public projects may be used to 
stabilize national employment and income, it 
will be of some interest to review the sugges- 
tions put forward some time ago by the 
Dominion Government with this object in 
view. 

In his statement on "Employment and 
Income" the Right Honourable Mr. Howe 
referred to deliberate use of public investment 
expenditures as a permanent instrument in 
employment policy, and went on to say that 
"since in the inter-war years the public invest- 
ment expenditures of provincial and municipal 
governments have been much greater than 
those of the Dominion Government, it will be 
an essential part of such a policy that advance 
planning on the part of these governments 
should be encouraged, and, without interfering 
with provincial or municipal decisions in 
respect of the direction of their own expendi- 
tures, co-operation should be sought on the 
timing of such expenditures". 



1947] 



PUBLIC INVESTMENT IN CONSTRUCTION 



131 



In subsequent discussions with the provinces, 
the Dominion Government put forward pro- 
posals designed towards implementation of 
the policy outlined above 1 . It will be recalled 
that these proposals included encouragement 
towards complete advance planning of pro- 
vincial and municipal public projects by 
means of dominion planning grants; assist- 
ance in securing the services of experienced 
designers in cases where advance planning was 
means of Dominion planning grants; assistr- 
and encouragement towards timing of public 
investment in construction by payment of 
Dominion timing grants as defrayment of a 
portion of the construction costs of public 
projects initiated when requested by the 
Dominion Government. 

National Resources Projects 

Although a detailed description of the 
subject is not within the scope of this discus- 
sion, brief reference may be made to the 
timing aspects of Dominion Government 
expenditures on the development and conser- 
vation of natural resources. It is realized that 
as this program assumes a definite form it will 
be found that expenditures on some of the 
resources projects must be continuous, but, on 
the other hand, a substantial portion may be 
varied according to conditions of employment, 
and thus play an appropriate part in stabiliza- 
tion of national production. 



iL.G. 1945, p. 1280. 



Conclusion 

It cannot be too strongly emphasized that 
any national employment problem which 
develops is not to be solved by huge expendi- 
tures on "public works". This procedure can 
be of specific assistance toward the solution of 
the problem if all individual undertakings 
which can provide effective remedial action are 
put in hand, but other highly significant actions 
along the lines referred to in the statement 
on "Employment and Income" must also be 
taken if best results are to be achieved. 

As is very often the case with respect to 
problems not purely technical, engineers will 
play a very important role in the effective 
application of the policy of timing public 
investment in relation to national production 
levels. The existing national shortage of tech- 
nical persons includes an acute national short- 
age of personnel required for advance planning 
of construction, and adequate reserves of 
completely planned projects can be assembled 
only by making the best use of the services of 
those available. Decisions to defer construc- 
tion items are in many instances dependent 
upon sound engineering advice to those respon- 
sible for decisions on policy, themselves 
engineers, in many cases. Undoubtedly the 
engineering profession will be responsible for 
most of the detailed planning of actions 
designed to make use of public projects to 
maintain and improve national production, 
and, as in the past, the profession will be 
equal to the task. 



Wartime Labour Relations Regulations Amended 



AMENDMENTS to the Wartime Labour 
Relations Regulations, P.C. 1003, went 
into effect on February 15. Promulgated 
under Order in Council P.C. 302 on January 
30, the amendments: (1) formally returned 
wages to the ambit of collective bargaining; 
(2) incorporated in P.C. 1003 the provisions 
of Order in Council P.C. 4020 governing the 
appointment of inquiry commissions to 
investigate labour disputes; and (3) prepared 
the way for the return to provincial juris- 
diction of industries which during the war 
were specifically subjected to Dominion con- 
trol as war industries. 

In a statement accompanying the tabling 
of the amending order in the House of 
Commons, the Minister explained its objec- 
tives as follows: — 

"The first objective is to meet a situation 
brought about by the termination of control 
of wages by the Dominion. While wage 
control was in effect, the subject of wages 
was not one that was open to the usual 
collective bargaining procedures between 
workers and management. Since wage rates 
had to be fixed by the appropriate war labour 
board up to November 30 last, P.C. 1003, the 
Wartime Labour- Relations Regulations, pro- 
viding for compulsory collective bargaining 
within Dominion jurisdiction exempted the 
whole field of wage rates from the collective 
bargaining contemplated by the Regulations. 
The present Order in Council now amends 
P.C. 1003 in such manner as to include the 
subject of wages among the other subjects 
open to free collective bargaining between 
employer and employees. The new Order in 
Council makes the changes in P.C. 1003 
needed to meet this changed situation, 

"The second objective of the present order 
is to consolidate P.C. 4020 into P.C. 1003. 
P.C. 4020, passed June 6, 1941, was the Order 
in Council providing for the appointment of 
Industrial Disputes Inquiry Commissions to 
investigate disputes or differences between 
employers and employees, and also complaints 
of discrimination for union activity, and to 
report to the Minister of Labour. It is felt 
that at this time it is advantageous to con- 
solidate where possible all existing procedures 
in relation to the investigation and concilia- 
tion of industrial disputes into a single instru- 
ment, namely, P.C. 1003. 

"The order also provides for the repeal 
effective March 31 next of Schedule A to 
the Regulations. This has the effect of 



returning to the provinces as of that date 
jurisdiction over certain industries enumer- 
ated in the schedule and described as war 
industry." 

The 14 industrial classifications designated 
as war industries under the Regulations are 
presented below: — 

Schedule A 

1 . A work or undertaking engaged in mining 
or smelting operations; 

2. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in manufacturing or assembling aircraft 
parts; 

3. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in manufacturing or assembling tanks or 
universal carriers; 

4. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in manufacturing or assembling automobile 
or truck parts; 

5. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in smelting or refining aluminum; 

6. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in refining or producing oil or petroleum 
products; 

7. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in producing or processing natural or 
synthetic rubber; 

8. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in manufacturing chemicals for war 
purposes; 

9. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in producing or manufacturing steel for 
war industry or war purposes; 

10. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in building or construction or demolition 
projects under a contract or subcontract, 
intended for the use of His Majesty in 
right of Canada, including the construc- 
tion, erection, repair, improvement or 
extension of buildings, aerodromes, 
harbours, dock yards, roads, defence 
fortifications, or other naval, military or 
air force works; 

11. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in shipbuilding, including shipbuilding 
accessories; 

12. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in the production of machinery, arms, 
shells, ammunition, explosives, implements 
of war, or naval, military or air stores; 

13. A work, undertaking or business engaged 
in transportation or communication; 

14. Public Service utilities, including gas, 
electric, water and power works, telegraph 
and telephone lines. 

The Minister later indicated that he 
intended to recommend extension of the 
Regulations covering industries coming under 
Dominion authority to May 15 to provide 
time for review of suggestions respecting new 
legislation and the passing of a new bill by 
Parliament. Similar extension would be re- 
commended for provinces which have adapted 



132 



WARTIME LABOUR RELATIONS REGULATIONS 



133 



the Regulations to provincial industries, if they 
so desired. Mr. Mitchell stated that this 
would enable the provinces to delay passage 
of legislation and follow the pattern of the 
revised Dominion bill. 

Text of Order in Council P.C. 302 

His Excellency the Governor General in 
Council, on the recommendation of the Minister 
of Labour, and under the authority of The 
National Emergency Transitional Powers Act, 
1945, is pleased to amend the Wartime Labour 
Relations Regulations and they are hereby 
further amended, effective February 15, 1947, 
as follows: 

1. The following paragraph is inserted in 
subsection one of section two immediately fol- 
lowing paragraph (e) : 

"(ee) 'dispute' means any dispute or differ- 
ence or apprehended dispute or differ- 
ence between an employer and one or 
more of his employees or bargaining 
representatives acting on behalf of his 
employees, as to matters or things affect- 
ing or relating to terms and conditions 
of employment or work done or to be 
done by him or by the employee or 
employees or as to privileges, rights and 
duties of the employer or the employee 
or employees"; 

2. Subsection four of section ten is revoked. 

3. Subsection two of section sixteen is 
revoked and the following substituted therefor: 

"(2) Where either party to a collective 
agreement, whether made before or 
after the effective date of these Regula- 
tions, has required the other to enter into 
negotiations for the renewal or revision 
of the agreement or the conclusion of a 
new agreement, sections eleven, twelve, 
thirteen and fourteen shall apply to such 
negotiations as in the case of negotiations 
for a collective agreement following cer- 
tification of bargaining representatives 
under these Regulations:" 

4. Subsections one to four inclusive of sec- 
tion twenty-one are revoked and the following 
substituted therefor: 

"21. (1) Where there is no collective agree- 
ment in force between an employer and 
his employees or bargaining represen- 
tatives of his employees, no employee 
shall go on strike and the employer of 
such employees shall not declare or cause 
a lockout of such employees by reason of 
any dispute unless 

(a) bargaining representatives for the 
employees affected have endeavoured 
to effect an agreement with the 
employer under sections eleven and 
twelve; and 

(b) a Conciliation Board has been 
appointed and fourteen days have 
elapsed since the Conciliation Board 
reported to the Minister. 

(2) Except in respect of a dispute that is 
subject to the provisions of subsection 
three, no employer who is a party to a 
collective agreement shall declare or 
cause a lockout and no employee bound 
thereby shall go on strike during the 
term of the collective agreement. 



(3) Where a collective agreement is in force 
between an employer and his employees 
or bargaining representatives of his 
employees and any dispute arises with 
reference to the revision of a provision 
of the agreement that by the provisions 
of the agreement is subject to revision 
during the term of the agreement, the 
employer shall not declare or cause a 
lockout and no employee shall go on 
strike until an attempt has been made 
to effect an agreement under sections 
eleven and twelve and fourteen days have 
elapsed since the Conciliation Board 
reported to the Minister. 

(4) Where notice to enter into negotiations 
with a view to the completion of a col- 
lective agreement has been given pur- 
sant to the provisions of section ten of 
the Regulations, the employer shall not, 
without consent by or on behalf of the 
employees affected, decrease rates of 
wages or alter any term or condition of 
employment relating to hours of work 
or holidays of employees affected by the 
negotiations, until a collective agreement 
has been concluded or a Conciliation 
Board appointed to endeavour to effect 
an agreement between the parties has 
reported to the Minister and fourteeen 
days have elapsed after the report has 
been received by the Minister, whichever 
is the earlier. 

(5) Where a party to a collective agreement, 
whether made before or after the effec- 
tive date of these Regulations, has given 
notice, pursuant to section sixteen of 
the Regulations, to the other party to 
the agreement to enter into negotiations 
with a view to the renewal or revision 
of the said agreement or the conclusion 
of a new agreement, the employer shall 
not, without consent by or on behalf of 
the employees affected, decrease rates 
of wages or alter any other term or con- 
dition of employment in effect immedi- 
ately prior to the expiry or termination 
of the said agreement in so far as applic- 
able to the employees affected by the 
agreement, until a renewal or revision of 
the agreement or a new collective agree- 
ment has been concluded or a Concilia- 
tion Board appointed to endeavour to 
effect an agreement has reported to the 
Minister and fourteen days have elapsed 
after the report has been received by the 
Minister, whichever is the earlier." 

5. Subsection five of section twenty-one is 
renumbered as subsection six. 

6. Section forty-six is revoked and the fol- 
lowing is substituted therefor: 

46. Where in any industry a dispute between 
employees and employers with respect to 
terms or conditions of employment of 
such employees exists or is apprehended, 
for the final settlement of which no pro- 
cedure is provided either by these 
Regulations or by the terms of any 
collective agreement, the Minister may 
instruct a conciliation officer to confer 
with the parties to the dispute to 
endeavour to bring about agreement 
between them. 



134 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



FEBRUARY 



7. The following section is added immediately- 
following section forty-six: 

46A. (1) Where in any industry a dispute or 
difference between employers and em- 
ployees exists or is apprehended, or in 
any other case where he deems it expedi- 
ent to make inquiry in industrial matters, 
the Minister may refer the matters 
involved to a Commission to be designated 
an Industrial Disputes Inquiry Commis- 
sion, for investigation thereof as the 
Minister deems expedient and for report 
thereon; and the Minister shall furnish 
the Commission with a statement of the 
matters concerning which such inquiry is 
to be made and in the case of any inquiry 
involving any particular persons or 
parties, shall advise such persons or 
parties of such appointment. 

(2) Immediately following its appointment, 
and Industrial Disputes Inquiry Com- 
mission shall inquire into the matters 
referred to it by the Minister and 
endeavour to carry out its terms of 
reference: and (if a settlement is not 
effected in the meantime) it shall report 
the result of its inquiries, including its 
recommendations, to the Minister within 
fourteen days of its appointment or such 
extension thereof as the Minister may, 
from time to time, grant. 

(3) Upon receipt of a report of an Industrial 
Disputes Inquiry Commission relating to 
any dispute or difference between 
employer and employees, the Minister 
shall furnish a copy to each of the parties 
affected and may publish the report of 
any Industrial Disputes Inquiry Com- 
mission in such manner as he sees fit. 

(4) An Industrial Disputes Inquiry Com- 
mission shall consist of one or more mem- 
bers appointed by the Minister and the 
provisions of sections thirty-one to 
thirty-four of these Regulations shall 
apply mutatis mutandis as though enacted 
in respect of that Commission. 

(5) Except as otherwise provided by the 
Governor General in Council, the Chair- 
man and members of an Industrial Dis- 
putes Inquiry Commission shall be paid 
remuneration and expenses at the same 



rate as is payable to a Chairman and 
members of a Conciliation Board under 
these Regulations. 

(6) An Industrial Disputes Inquiry Commis- 
sion may be appointed by the Minister to 
inquire into any complaint that an 
employer, contrary to these Regulations, 
has discharged or otherwise discriminated 
against an employee in relation to his 
employment or any term or condition of 
employment because such employee is a 
member or officer or representative of 
a trade union and failing settlement of 
the matters at issue in the inquiry, the 
Commission shall report its findings and 
recommendations to the Minister. 

(7) Following receipt of such report the 
Minister may, by order, require any 
person named in the complaint to do any 
act or thing or cease to do any act or 
thing as he deems necessary to give 
effect to the recommendations of the 
Commission, and such order shall be 
conclusive and binding upon the employer 
and employee and any other interested 
party. 

(8) Any person refusing or failing to com- 
ply with an order made by the Minister 
under this section shall be guilty of an 
offence and liable upon summary con- 
viction to a fine not exceeding five 
hundred dollars for every day or part of 
a day on which such refusal or failure 
continues. 

His Excellency in Council is further pleased 
to revoke Order in Council P.C. 4020 of June 
6, 1941, as amended (providing for Industrial 
Disputes Inquiry Commissions) and it is hereby 
revoked effective February 15, 1947, provided, 
however, that the said Order shall continue in 
force and effect in so far as may be necessary 
for the purpose of disposing of any proceedings 
or other matters pending thereunder at the 
date of revocation thereof. 

His Excellency in Council is also pleased, 
hereby, to revoke paragraph (&) of subsection 
one of section three and subsections two and 
three of section three and Schedule "A" to the 
aforesaid Wartime Labour Relations Regula- 
tions, such revocation to be effective on March 
31, 1947. 



Union Security in Quebec 



T^ HE results of a survey into the extent and 
•*■ types of union security provisions in 
collective agreements in the Province of 
Quebec have been released by the Industrial 
Relations Department of Laval University. 
Published in the Department's Industrial Re- 
lations Bulletin, they represent completion of 
the initial phase of a projected comprehensive 
study on the whole question of union security. 
Other phases of investigation currently antici- 
pated are the reasons which induce employers 
to include union security provisions in agree- 
ments, the reasons why unions request them 
and the way in which the agreements operate. 
About 355 collective agreements concluded 
in industry, trade and the utility field were 



examined. Of these 208 or 58-6 per cent con- 
tained union security provisions. 

Affiliated unions of the Canadian and 
Catholic Confederation of Labour accounted 
for 199 of the recorded agreements. Of these 
144 or 72*3 per cent contained union security 
provisions. Of a total of 69 agreements signed 
by Trades and Labour Congress affiliates, 33 
or 56-5 per cent embodied union security pro- 
visions. Canadian Congress of Labour unions 
were stated to have 52 functioning agreements 
in Quebec, of which 26 or 50 per cent possessed 
clauses providing for some form of union 
security. Unions unaffiliated to the three 
major labour bodies accounted for 35 agree- 



1947] 

ments of which only 14-3 per cent embodied 
union security provisions. 

The report stated that union security clauses 
usually varied sufficiently to make precise 
classification difficult. However, in order to 
systematize the analysis six general classifica- 
tions were adopted. These classifications were 
denned as follows: 



UNION SECURITY IN QUEBEC 



135 



Check-off of union dues: — Where the 
employer deducts the union dues from the 
employees' wages and remits the amount to 
the treasurer of the union. 

The frequency of occurrence of the various 
classifications in the agreements reviewed is 
shown in the following table. 



Total 


C.C.C.L. 


355 


199 


3 


2 


95 


73 


10 


4 


51 


24 


26 


16 


66 


34 


108 


52 


110 


47 



T.L.C 




Others 



Collective agreements 

Closed shop 

Perfect union shop 

Imperfect union shop 

Maintenance of membership 

Union preference 

Check-off of union dues 

Open shop 

No mention of a provision for union security 



35 



Closed Shop: — Where employer employs 
union members only and is allowed to hire 
new workers from amongst union members 
only. 

Perfect union shop: — Where the employer 
employs union members only, but may hire 
non-union workers or union workers as' he 
pleases. However, the non-union workers hired 
must join the union. 

Imperfect union shop: — Where the actual or 
future members of the union are required to 
maintain their membership, and all new 
employees must join the union. Existing 
employees who are not union members are 
not required to join the union. 

Maintenance of membership: — Where the 
actual or future members of the union are 
required to maintain their membership. The 
others are not compelled to join the union, 
either during their employment or upon enter- 
ing the service of their new employer. 

Preferential shop: — Where the employer 
favours the union or the union members in 
certain particular instances. 



The check-off total in the above table was 
further broken down into the number appear- 
ing above and the number which were com- 
bined with other union security clauses. Of 
the total, 35 agreements provided for check-off 
solely. The check-off combined with the closed 
shop appeared in one agreement, with the 
perfect union shop in 15, with maintenance of 
membership in 13, and with union preference 
in two. 

The report commented on the likelihood of 
complications arising when security provisions 
did not provide for a check-off but established 
one of the various other types. In cases where 
union membership is mandatory as a condition 
of employment, it states, "the employer has no 
guarantee" that membership fees will be paid. 

While the report emphasized the fact that 
conclusions on the survey were being avoided 
for the time being, it presented the opinion 
that union security clauses were in vogue in 
the Province of Quebec since 58-6 per cent of 
the agreements signed under the Labour Re- 
lations Act contained one or several of such 
clauses, and that the perfect union shop was 
the most popular form of union security, 
occurring in 27 per cent of the agreements 
negotiated. 



Index Numbers of Wage Rates in Canada, 1939 to 1945 



A rise in wage rates of 2-8 per cent between 
•*■*■ 1944 and 1945 is indicated by the latest 
survey carried out by the Research and 
Statistics Branch, Department of Labour. 

The accompanying table contains index 
numbers of wage rates by industries, and 
by main groups of industries, for the period 
1939 to 1945. As the index is based on rates 
in the year 1939 as 100 the percentage in- 
crease in any of the years compared with 
1939 may be determined by subtracting 100 
from the index figure for any industry or 
group shown in the table. 

The general index covering all industries 
was 41-8 per cent higher in 1945 than in 1939 
and 2-8 per cent higher than in 1944. The 
increase from 1943 to 1944 was 3-1 per cent. 



This compares with an increase of 9*1 per 
cent in 1943 over 1942, and of between 8 and 
9 per cent in each of the two preceding years, 
and of 3-9 per cent in 1940 over 1939. 

The largest percentage increase, 5 per cent, 
in 1945 compared with the previous year was 
in the service group which includes wage 
rates in laundries only. In the same compari- 
son the index for the logging group increased 
4-9 per cent, manufacturing 3-6 per cent, 
mining 1-3 per cent, construction 1*2 per cent 
transportation 0-4 per cent. 

Report No. 28, in which the wage rates for 
selected occupations in many industries are 
being published for 1945, in addition to tables 
of index numbers, is expected to be available 
in a few weeks' time. 



INDEX NUMBERS OF WAGE RATES IN CANADA, BY INDUSTRY, 1939-1945 

(Rates in 1939 = 100) 



Industry 


1939 


1940 


1941 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


Logging 


100 
100 
100 

100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

100 

100 
100 
100 

100 

100 

100 
100 

100 

100 
100 
100 
100 

100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

100 

100 
100 
100 


104-9 
105-9 
101-1 

102-5 
102-1 
102-8 
103-0 
101-0 
102-7 

104-3 
107-5 
109-6 
107-6 
105-8 
106-8 
105-3 
107-2 
106-0 
101-7 
106-1 

102-1 

104-6 
108-1 
103-7 
103-4 

102-9 

101-7 
101-3 
101-4 

104-4 
105-0 
105-0 
101-7 

102-9 
103-1 
102-9 
103-5 
101-9 

105-3 

105-9 

104-5 
106-2 


114-0 
114-8 
110-8 

111-2 
109-4 
112-2 
112-2 
107-8 
113-7 

115-2 
119-0 
123-8 
120-1 
112-5 
122-9 
118-0 
117-9 
118-2 
126-9 
118-8 

117-1 

109-5 
114-4 
107-7 
107-5 

115-5 

105-8 
105-5 
105-9 

117-7 
115-0 
120-0 
125-0 

115-0 
113-9 
115-5 
114-4 
114-5 

113-7 

122-5 
119-5 
123-2 


125-9 
124-9 
129-7 

116-6 
113-1 
118-7 
118-0 
114-4 
123-0 

125-5 
127-8 
128-1 
136-6 
123-6 
129-0 
129-0 
129-8 
133-3 
131-8 
127-5 

127-1 

115-1 
124-0 
109-6 
113-2 

123-9 

110-0 
10S-3 
110-6. 

131-0 

130-7 
123-7 
139-0 

122-5 
121-5 
123-9 
121-8 
118-2 

121-7 

134-8 
133-9 
135-0 


143-1 
142-0 
147-5 

123-7 
124-8 
123-1 
121-7 
121-7 
128-7 

136-8* 

140-4 

136-6 

152-8 

138-5 

141-3 

139-3 

146-6 

140-8 

134-5 

133-2 

134-4* 

120-3 
128-6 
115-4 
1201 

128-9 

113-7* 

112-5 
113-8 

142-9* 
143-8 
134-7 
147-6 

130-0* 

133-3 

128-9 

131-9 

130-0 

127-3 

142-9 
148-9 
141-7 


146-1 
143-2 
156-8 

134-8 
146-0 
125-2 
123-7 
127-4 
132-1 

141-4* 

146-0 

139-1 

160-3 

146-2 

147-0 

144-3 

151-9 

141 

137-5 

138-9 

139-8* 

125-7 
135-3* 
119-6 
124-7 

133-1 

116-3* 
116-5 
114-9 

148-2* 
148-7 
139-4 
154-8 

134-2* 

135-0 

134-3 

135-8 

131-8 

130-5 

145-4 
168-8 

142-0 


153-3 




151-4 




160-5 


Mining 


136-5 




146-2 


Metal mining 


128-2 




124-6 




127-4 




141-9 


Manufacturing 


146-5 




151-5 




148-7 




163-5 




150-3 




148-9 




156-3 




104-1 




148-0 




152-7 




152-5 




143-4 




127-3 


Pulp 


136-3 




120-9 




126-8 




13S-5 




118-5 




119-1 




117-7 




156-1 




157-5 




147-2 




159-5 




139-4 




139-2 




139-0 




142-0 




139-0 




140-5 




153-5 




167-0 


Boots and shoes 


150-1 



136 



WAGE RATES IN CANADA 



137 



INDEX NUMBERS OF WAGE RATES IN CANADA, BY INDUSTRY, 1939-1945 
(Rates in 1939 = 100)— Concluded 



Industry 



1939 


1940 


1941 


1942 


1943 


1944 


100 


103-2 


112-7 


119-0 


135-1 


137-3 


100 


102-7 


112-9 


125-6 


138-8 


142-6 


100 


101-5 


108-1 


122-2 


135-5 


143-5 


100 


104-5 


116-0 


120-9 


137-0 


140-8 


100 


105-0 


116-2 


129-7 


141-7 


147-9 


100 


99-0 


109-5 


122-7 


134-0 


138-7 


100 


104-9 


121-2 


132-2 


144-4 


145-3 


100 


100-6 


108-6 


115-8 


122-7 


126-3 


100 


103-4 


110-2 


127-0 


145-7 


147-1 


100 


104-5 


115-6 


131-0 


143-5 


149-5 


100 


105-1 


117-6 


136-7 


151-9 


155-8 


100 


102-8 


113-0 


120-4 


131-5 


140-3 


100 


103-9 


113-3 


117-1 


121-9 


123-5 


100 


103-3 


112-0 


120-2 


129-6 


132-5 


100 


105-6 


123-2 


133-7 


149-2* 


• 154-1* 


100 


104-5 


111-6 


118-6 


127-7 


129-6 


100 


101-3 


109-7 


116-4 


127-0 


128-0 


100 


101-3 


110-1 


117-0 


127-7 


128-7 


100 


105-2 


113-3 


125-8 


138-8 


142-2 


100 


100-0 


109-4 


114-8 


125-5 


125-5 


100 


103-9 


109-1 


115-8 


121-2 


125-7 


100 


101-3 


106-4 


112-0 


121-9 


122-4 


100 


105-4 


110-5 


116-5 


127-3 


128-9 


100 


103 9 


113 1 


122 5 


133 7* 


137 9* 



1945 






Manufacturing— Con. 

Edible animal products (meat products) 

Iron and its products 

Crude, rolled and forged products 

Foundry and machine shop products 

Machinery, engines, boilers, tanks, etc 

Aircraft 

, Shipbuilding (steel ships) 

Automobiles, trucks, etc 

Automobile and truck equipment and parts 

Stoves, furnaces, etc 

Agricultural implements 

Tobacco products 

Beverages (brewery products) 

Electric current production and distribution 

Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Construction 

Transportation and Communication 

Transportation , 

.Water transportation (Inland and Coastal). . 

Steam railways 

Electric street railways 

Communication — Telephona 

Service — Laundries 

GENERAL AVERAGE 



141-0 

148-2 
149-1 
149-5 
147-3 
148-7 
145-9 
130-3 
148-2 
155-4 
157-5 

140-5 

127-9 

134-4 

156-8 

131-1 

128-8 
129-2 
144-6 
125-5 
126-6 
125-6 

135-4 

141-8 



Revised. 



International Labour Organization 



Industrial Committees of the ILO 



r T > BE first stage in the program of the Inter- 
•*■ national Labour Organization for dealing 
with the labour problems of individual indus- 
tries through tripartite committees has been 
completed. Each of the seven industrial com- 
mittees that have so far been established has 
now held its first meeting. 

Created with the idea that the ILO could 
approach the problems that arise in each 
industry more effectively through special com- 
mittees than through the more generalized 
procedure of the International Labour Con- 
ference, the committees at their first meetings 
have considered social policy and its economic 
foundations in each industry. Although the 
opening meetings were largely exploratory in 
character, and designed to chart the problems 
to be discussed in future, each committee 
adopted resolutions requesting action on 
specific questions by governments, employers, 
workers, the International Labour Office, and, 
in some cases, other international organiza- 
tions. The practice has been to submit these 
resolutions to the Governing Body of the ILO 
for reference to the appropriate authorities. 

Textile and Building Committees 

Summaries of the proceedings of the first 
meetings of the Textiles and Building Com- 
mittees appear below in separate articles. 

Petroleum Committee 

The first meeting of the Petroleum Commit- 
tee, which had originally been planned to take 
place in Lima, Peru, was held at Los Angeles, 
California, early in February. The Committee 
dealt with both production and refining. 

The Canadian Government representatives 
were Mr. Ronald H. Hooper, Industrial Rela- 
tions Officer of the Department of Labour at 
Winnipeg, and Mr. V. E. Duclos, Canadian 
Trade Commissioner at Los Angeles. 



Canadian employers in the industry were 
represented by Mr. F. C. Mechin, Director of 
the Imperial Oil Company, Toronto, and Mr. 
Richard F. Hinton, Industrial Relations Man- 
ager of the Shell Oil Company, also of 
Toronto. 

Workers' representatives were Mr. Birt 
Showier, President of the Vancouver Trades 
and Labour Council, and Vice-President of 
the Trades and Labour Congress of Canada, 
and Mr. Daniel O'Brien, Regional Director 
of the Canadian Congress of Labour, 
Vancouver. 

An account of this meeting will appear in 
a subsequent issue of the Labour Gazette. 

Second Meetings of Coal and Inland 
Transport Committees 

The Coal Mining Committee and the Inland 
Transport Committee will hold their second 
meetings at Geneva in April and May. 

Both committees will consider the action 
taken in the various member countries to 
give effect to the decisions of their first 
meetings, and the steps taken by the Inter- 
national Labour Office to follow up the 
studies and inquiries that were then proposed 
by the committees. 

The Coal Mining Committee will then 
proceed to a discussion of the production 
requirements of the various countries, recent 
technical advancements in the industry, and 
the recruitment and training of labour. The 
problem of hours of work, to which the 
Committee at its first meeting attached 
special importance, will also receive 
consideration. 

On the agenda of the Inland Transport 
Committee will be the recruitment, training 
and use of labour in the industry, a survey 
of collective bargaining machinery, and 
problems involved in the compilation of 
labour statistics in inland transport. 



138 



INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANIZATION 



139 



First Meeting of Textiles Committee, Brussels, 
November 14-22, 1946 



THE Textiles Committee of the ILO, meet- 
ing in its first session at Brussels, 
November 14 to 22, 1946, adopted resolutions 
on some of the most urgent problems of the 
industry and recommended that inquiries be 
made by the International Labour Office into 
a number of other questions with a view to 
their consideration at later sessions. 

Representatives of the following eighteen 
member states of the ILO attended the meet- 
ing: United States of America, Australia, 
Belgium, Canada, China, Denmark, Egypt, 
France, United Kingdom, India, Italy, 
Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Poland, 
Sweden and Switzerland. All these countries 
had appointed tripartite delegations. A total 
of 135 delegates, advisers and observers 
attended the first session which held seven 
plenary sittings. 

The Canadian delegation was composed as 
follows: — 

Government Delegate s. — Mr. Raymond 
Ranger, Assistant to the Deputy Minister of 
Labour, Ottawa; Mr. F. J. Ainsborough, 
Industrial Relations Officer, Department of 
Labour, Toronto, Ontario. 

Employers' Delegates.— Mr. H. G. Smith, 
President, Mohawk Mills Ltd., Hamilton, 
Ontario; Mr. W. A. Kennedy, Director of 
Aberfoyle Manufacturing Co., Guelph, Ontario. 

Workers' Delegates. — Mr. A. Spivey, Vice- 
President, Local 147, United Textile Workers 
Ltd., Huntingdon, Que.; Mr. M. Leger, 
President, Local 779, Textile Workers Union 
of America, Cornwall, Ontario. 

Radi Bey, Under-Secretary of State, Min- 
istry of Social Affairs, Egypt, presided over 
the meeting, having been chosen as chairman 
by the Governing Body of the ILO at its 
98th Session (Montreal, May, 1946). 

The Committee devoted most of its time 
to an examination of two groups of questions, 
namely : — 

(a) Production and related questions, includ- 
ing wages, hours of work, and the recruitment 
and training of personnel; 

(b) Social security and welfare, including 
the extension of social services, improved 
working conditions and welfare facilities, and 
holidays with pay. 

These two groups of questions were con- 
sidered in detail by sub-committees which 
later reported back to the Committee as a 
whole. 



The Textile Industry 

The world-wide need for increased produc- 
tion of textile goods strongly influenced the 
Committee's approach to the problem of 
improving labour conditions. 

"As a result of the war," the Committee 
pointed out in a statement on its work, "there 
is an accumulated need for textile goods, and 
the pressing problem before the industry is 
how to meet this demand in the interests of 
the well-being of the peoples of the world. 
The Committee emphasizes that this calls for 
a great effort on the part of all concerned 
in the industry and that the industry should 
be given every support in carrying out this 
urgent and vital task. 

"When the immediate need has been 
satisfied, the industry will still have many 
problems to face. As a result of the war 
and the years of depression, much of the 
plant and machinery of the industry requires 
renewal. The Committee feels -that the 
modernization of the industry is essential if 
the production of textile goods is to be 
increased and if the workers in the industry 
are to enjoy those improved working con- 
ditions and greater security which are so 
desirable. The output of machinery and 
equipment is, however, insufficient and the 
Committee therefore requests the Governing 
Body of the ILO to draw attention to 
Governments and of the competent specialized 
agencies of the United Nations to this 
problem. 

"Another of the problems confronting the 
industry in many countries is that of the 
shortage of labour. The employers' and 
workers' organizations in the industry are 
examining this problem in their respective 
countries and the Committee will continue to 
give it close attention. In view of the serious 
nature of the problem, however, the Com- 
mittee requests the Governing Body of the 
ILO to draw the attention of Governments to 
the need for giving special consideration, in 
co-operation with employers' and workers' 
organizations, to the question of the recruit- 
ment and training of personnel for the textile 
industry in drawing up and carrying out their 
manpower programs." 

While the need for improving production 
was an overriding consideration at this first 
meeting, the Committee nevertheless agreed 
"that it was only by improving materially the 
status of the textile workers that it would be 
possible to recruit trained workers in sufficient 
numbers to meet the enormously increased 



140 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[FEBRUARY 



need for textile products in all countries of 
the world." 

Decisions of Committee 

The Committee was able to reach unanimous 
agreement on a number of resolutions dealing 
with employment and working conditions. Its 
action on various specific questions was as 
follows: — 

Full Employment 

In a resolution on this question, the Com- 
mittee emphasized the necessity of plans being 
made which would secure full employment to 
textile workers throughout the world. It 
believed that "governments, no less than 
industry, have a very important function to 
fulfil in the solution of the problem," and 
therefore urged "the fullest co-operation 
between governments, employers and workers 
in the textile industry in each country on the 
one hand, and that the resources of raw 
materials and equipment should be fully 
utilized through measures of international 
co-operation, on the other hand." 

Need for Increased Production 

The Committee declared "that there exists 
an emergency in the form of a serious 
shortage of all types of textiles immediately 
required by the peoples of the world." It 
therefore appealed to all governments, 
employers and employees and their respective 
representatives "to work wholeheartedly and 
contribute their utmost in stepping up world 
production immediately." 

Reduction of Working Hours 

Considerable debate took place on the ques- 
tion of working hours. A draft resolution 
submitted by the workers' group urged 
member states of the ILO to ratify at once 
the Convention (adopted at the 1937 Confer- 
ence) relating to the 40-hour week in the 
textile industry. 

It outlined a series of measures most likely 
to achieve for the industry conditions favour- 
ing a reduction in the hours of work, and it 
called attention especially to the importance 
of re-equipping the industry with modern 
machinery in order to achieve the most 
efficient production possible. 

In supporting this resolution, the workers' 
members urged particularly that the solution 
of the obstacles to production should not be 
sought by lengthening hours of work, but 
rather by the modernization of equipment and 
methods of production in the industry. How- 
ever, they fully recognized the difficulties with 
which the industry was at present faced, and 
stated that it was not their intention to ask 
for the immediate application of the 40-hour 
week. 



The employers' members, without question- 
ing the principle of the 40-hour week in the 
textile industry, emphasized that the present 
shortage of textile products in the world and 
the reconstruction needs ■ of war-devastated 
countries made the immediate application of 
the 40-hour week in the textile industry' 
inopportune at this time. 

Some government members called attention 
particularly to the fact that, if one of the 
objectives of the Textiles Committee was to 
bring back into the industry the workers 
which it required, the application of the 
40-hour week in the industry would clearly 
constitute an effective means of attaining this 
end. 

The following resolution was finally adopted, 
reconciling the divergent opinions expressed 
by the various groups: — 

The Textiles Committee of the ILO, meet- 
ing in Brussels, 14-22 November, 194G, is of 
the opinion that the adoption of a working 
week of not more than 40 hours in the textile 
industry is ultimately inevitable. 

It considers, having regard to the expres- 
sion of opinion in the Committee concerning 
the trend towards the 40-hour week, that the 
time has arrived when each State Member 
should declare to the International Labour 
Office its attitude towards the early ratifica- 
tion of the Reduction of Hours of Work 
(Textiles) Convention 1937. It requests the 
Governing Body of the International Labour 
Office therefore to convey this opinion to all 
States Members. 

It believes that more co-ordinated joint 
efforts by managements and workers within 
the textile industry would contribute to an 
appreciable extent towards meeting the needs 
of the consumer. 

It draws attention to the amount of out- 
of-date equipment which is still being used 
by many countries. 

It considers that combined efforts should 
be made to install in the mills the most 
modern machinery required for the efficient 
production of the various classes of textile 
goods. To hasten the realization of this 
re-equipment drive it calls upon all organiza- 
tions and governments to co-operate to bring 
about its early completion. 

Wages 

In regard to the question of wages the 
Committee took three-fold action. 

Considering first the problem of a "guar- 
anteed adequate weekly wage", the Committee 
urged Member States to recommend employers' 
and workers' organizations to negotiate on 
this point. It further asked the ILO 

to convey to each of its Member States its 
urgent request that they should declare their 
support of international policies aimed at 
guaranteeing adequate minimum weekly wages 
in the textile industries of their respective 
countries, requesting, at the same time, to be 
informed at an early date, and subsequently 
at regular intervals, of the position. 



1947] 



INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANIZATION 



141 



Secondly, the Committee affirmed that the 
textile operatives of certain countries have 
hitherto been inadequately paid, andi declared 
"that the wages paid to workers in the textile 
industry should not suffer by comparison with 
those paid to workers in industry in general 
for work requiring similar skill and effort." 

Thirdly, the Committee urged governments 
to "define their attitude to the principle of 
equal remuneration for work of equal value 
suggested in the Constitution of the ILO." 

Recruitment and Training 

Viewing "with great concern the reluctance 
of young persons and adults to accept 
employment" in the mills, the Committee 
considered that confidence in the industry 
could only be restored "by a bold declaration 
that the workers henceforth will be assured 
of guaranteed adequate minimum wages, satis- 
factory working conditions, and regular 
employment." 

The Committee approved the system of 
having a special section of the factory 
devoted to the training of new entrants, and 
urged its extension. It also advocated the 
provision of facilities either at the mill or at 
school for workers to improve their technical 
knowledge. 

Working Conditions and Welfare Facilities 

The Committee urged a policy of contin- 
ually improving working conditions, with 
particular reference to the following points: — 

(a) Installation of individual motor drives. 

(b) Reduction of noise. 

(c) Adequate aisles and passages. 

(d) Better control of ventilation and broader 

installation of air-conditioning. 

(e) Modern cleaning methods. 

(/) Adequate lighting, both natural and 

artificial. 
(g) Suitable finish on walls and ceilings. 
(h) Plant cleanliness. 

(i) Sanitary and] adequate lavatory facilities. 

(;') Adequate clothes lockers. 

(k) Day nurseries and medical services. 

(I) First-aid stations. 
(m) Canteens. 

The Committee requested the Office to 
acquaint governments with these recommen- 
dations, to urge their implementation, and to 
conduct studies on the practice in the various 
countries. 

Joint Committees on Health, Welfare and 
Safety 

The Committee recommended "that in all 
textile undertakings joint committees com- 
posed of an equal number of representatives 



elected by management and workers should 
be set up to promote health and welfare and 
the prevention of accidents. In these elections 
due regard should be paid to the number of 
women occupied in the undertakings." 

Social Security 

A world-wide extension of social services to 
provide insurance against the risks of unem- 
ployment, sickness, maternity, and injuries, 
and the establishment of retirement or old- 
age pensions were considered desirable by the 
Committee. The Office was asked to prepare 
a study of these matters, with particular 
reference to the textile industry. 

Holidays with Pay 

Approving the principle of holidays with 
pay, the Committee adopted a resolution con- 
sidering it to be essential that 

agreements already in existence should be 
amended or other suitable arrangements made 
to provide, after a suitable length of service, 
payment for at least two weeks' holiday or 
vacation; that payment for other public 
holidays not already paid for should be the 
subject of negotiations through regular 
channels in the several countries, with special 
arrangements for young persons; and that 
where no arrangement for holidays with pay 
exists, immediate steps should be taken to 
introduce the system on the lines indicated. 

Inquiries to be undertaken by the ILO 

In addition to those which have already 
been mentioned, the Committee asked the 
Office to undertake, in collaboration with the 
other international organizations concerned, 
studies on recruitment, wages, trade union 
organization, industrial relations, fatigue, 
health, accident prevention, lighting, tempera- 
ture, ventilation, weight lifting and carrying, 
removal of dust, general welfare and any 
effects of the shift system upon the health 
of all workers, international industrial agree- 
ments, unfair competition, unfair trading 
practices, methods of distribution, and the 
effects resulting from the restoration of the 
textile industries in Japan and Germany. 

Development of Textiles Industry in Germany 
and Japan 

Taking note of reports that the future 
industrial development of Germany and Japan 
will emphasize the manufacture of textiles, 
together with other products regarded by the 
Occupying Powers as non-military, the Com- 
mittee expressed fear of the danger of unfair 
competition from these two countries, 
"whether because of inadequate labour 
standards or dumping or for any other 
reason." 

It asked that the Governing Body bring 
this problem to the notice of the Economic 



142 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[FEBRUARY 



and Social Council and other international 
organizations concerned; and insisted 

that the Japanese and German textile 
economies shall be based upon a policy of 
ensuring to textile workers in both countries 
wages, earnings, hours and other conditions 
of work calculated to ensure a minimum 
living wage to all employed, in conformity 
with the Declaration of Philadelphia of 10th 
May, 1944, and that the principle of collec- 
tive bargaining be fostered and encouraged. 



Closing of Session 

The closing speeches expressed considerable 
satisfaction with the results obtained at this 
first meeting of the Textiles Committee, and 
the hope that the governments concerned 
would take the necessary steps to implement 
the terms of the resolutions adopted. 



First Meeting of Building Committee, Brussels, 
November 25-December 3, 1946 



n^HE Building, Civil Engineering and Public 
■*■ Works Committee of the ILO held its 
first meeting at Brussels between November 25 
and December 3, 1946. Problems relating 
to production in the reconstruction period, 
improvement of labour conditions, and indus- 
trial relations formed the basis of a number 
of resolutions recommending action by gov- 
ernments, organizations of employers and 
workers, the ILO, and other international 
organizations. Of particular interest were 
recommendations for a guaranteed weekly 
wage regardless of weather conditions, holi- 
days with pay, and public works planning. 

The meeting was attended by 122 delegates 
representing the governments, employers and 
workers of the following nineteen countries: 
Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, 
China, Denmark, Finland, France, India, 
Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland 
Sweden, Switzerland, the Union of South 
Africa, the United Kingdom of Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland, the United States of 
America. 

The Canadian Delegation consisted of 
eight members, namely: — 

Government Delegates. — Mr. P. E. Renaud, 
Counsellor and Chief of the Treaty Division, 
Department of External Affairs, Ottawa; Mr. 
J. A. Meindl, Employment Adviser, Unem- 
ployment Insurance Commission, Winnipeg. 

Government Adviser s. — Mr. F. J. 
Ainsborough, Industrial Relations Officer, 
Department of Labour, Toronto; Mr. R. 
Ranger, Assistant to the Deputy Minister, 
Department of Labour, Ottawa. 

Employers' Delegates. — Mr. J. C. Reilly, 
General Manager, Canadian Construction 
Association, Mansonville, Brome County, 
P.Q.; Mr. J. N. Flood, Director, Canadian 
Construction Association, Saint John, N.B. 

Workers' Delegate s. — Mr. J. Borden 
Cochrane, General Organizer, International 
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Toronto; 
Mr. 0. Filion, President, Building Trades 
Federation, Montreal. 



Dr. A. H. W. Hacke, of the Netherlands 
Government, presided over the session. 

The Construction Industry 

In a statement made on behalf of the 
International Labour Office at the opening of 
the meeting, Mr. H. de Bivort pointed out 
that the characterictic elements of the 
problem facing the construction industry in 
all countries were the urgency of the work 
and the shortages in materials, equipment and 
manpower. A system of priorities, intended 
to assist in securing the necessary raw 
materials, labour and financial means had 
been in operation in several countries; the 
priorities were based on the evaluation of 
the importance of the particular projects. 
Certain minimum standards in respect of 
materials, workmanship and amenities were 
insisted upon before the priorities were 
granted. This aspect of the matter was 
particularly important from the standpoint of 
the future development of the construction 
industry. 

Another important aspect of the problem, 
Mr. de Bivort went on, was the appearance 
of new processes such as the construction of 
prefabricated houses and the use of new or 
substitute materials. These would have a 
tremendous influence on the future develop- 
ment of the construction industry, particularly 
on its organization and the composition of its 
labour force. 

There followed a general discussion, in the 
course of which Mr. P. E. Renaud. Canadian 
Government delegate, gave an outline of the 
present position of the construction industry 
in Canada. He said that there were now 
almost 30 per cent more people in the 
industry than there had been a year 
previously. Referring to the rapid wartime 
expansion of Canada's productive capacity, 
he said that there was a backlog of demand 
for goods, both from home and abroad, and 
that output in the construction industry 



1947] 



INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANIZATION 



143 



(including housing) was limited only by the 
shortages of materials and skilled labour. 

Following the general discussion, the Com- 
mittee set up three sub-committees which 
dealt in detail with: — 

(a) General problems relating to production 
and reconstruction; 

(b) General conditions of work (including 
hours, holidays, guaranteed weekly wages, 
safety, and social security) ; 

(c) Industrial relations. 

On the basis of the recommendations of 
the sub-committees, the Committee adopted 
a number of resolutions which are described 
below. 

Production and Reconstruction 

Agreeing that construction was the collec- 
tive task of all countries, the Committee 
recommended that governments, management 
and labour, with the assistance of the ILO, 
should undertake the solution of five types 
of problems facing the industry. These it 
listed as (1) programs of work; (2) produc- 
tion; (3) reconstruction; (4) the recruiting 
and training of manpower; and (5) the 
stabilization of employment. 

The Committee appealed to governments 
to establish programs of work to cover a 
fairly long period subject to annual review. 
It considered that in the preparation and 
execution of such programs, governments 
should consult representatives of the appro- 
priate organizations of employers and workers. 

On the second problem, that of increasing 
production, the Committee, while of the 
opinion that the methods of mass production 
suitable for modern manufacturing industries 
were of only limited application in the con- 
ditions of the construction industries, never- 
theless recommended "that no means be 
neglected of increasing productivity in the 
industry by the adoption of new techniques 
including the use of alternative materials and 
the use of modern mechanical equipment", 
and asked the Office to investigate the methods 
employed in the different countries to increase 
productivity and individual output. The 
Committee stressed the advantages to be 
secured by the standardization of the com- 
ponents employed in construction and by the 
preparation of codes of practice. 

Dealing with reconstruction, the Committee 
considered that governments should decide 
the order of urgency of the work to be 
executed, and called attention to the variety 
of preliminary work necessary before con- 
struction could commence on docks, harbours, 
railways, canals, roads, bridges, etc. 

The Committee asked the Governing Body 
to draw the attention of the international 
organizations concerned to the need for an 



equitable flow of trade to ensure a better 
distribution of the materials and equipment 
essential to the construction industries. It 
proposed that special attention be paid to 
eliminating "any difficulties at present restrict- 
ing international trade in these commodities, 
without however prej udicing national 
markets." 

On the subject of recruitment and training 
of labour, the Committee stressed the impor- 
tance of facilitating the voluntary movement 
of available manpower from countries where 
there is a surplus to those where there is a 
shortage, and of increasing in the national 
field the numbers of craftsmen practising the 
various trades which are within the scope of 
the construction industry. Training should be 
given not only in the workshop and on con- 
struction works, but also by means of courses 
in approved technical schools. 

To stabilize employment at high wages the 
Committee emphasized the necessity of 
achieving maximum production. To this end 
it suggested that governments continuously 
review their policies relating to expenditure, 
taxation, and home and foreign trade. Public 
works programs should be ready for execu- 
tion when depression threatened; and 
employers' and workers' organizations should 
participate in their preparation. 

Conditions of Work 

The activities of the construction indus- 
tries, the Committee recognized, "are neces- 
sarily affected by special conditions such as 
frequent changes in work sites, the short-term 
nature of most projects, the substantial 
fluctuations in the size and the composition 
of the labour force required during the 
course of a project, the preponderance of 
outdoor operations, and the great influence of 
climatic and regional conditions." 

With these special factors in mind, the 
Committee made a number of recommenda- 
tions for improving labour conditions. 

Safety and Health 

The Committee requested the Governing 
Body to ask member states to consider the 
desirability of early ratification of the Safety 
Provisions (Building) Convention, 1937 * 

The future . work of the ILO in regard to 
safety in the construction industry should, 
the Committee thought, stress particularly 
the following aspects: — 

(a) The study of the special hazards in the 
construction industries not yet covered by 
international regulation; 



* The text of this Convention, and of four Recom- 
mendations adopted the same year has been published 
recently by the Department of Labour under the 
title "Safety in Building". 



144 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



FEBRUARY 



(b) Sanitary measures dealing in particular 
with clean drinking water, toilet and washing 
facilities, dry clothes storage, and, where 
needed by locational or other site conditions, 
canteens, dining halls, dormitories, living 
quarters and other amenities. 

Social Security 

Development of comprehensive social 
security systems in all countries was recom- 
mended by the Committee. 

Daily Working Hours and Methods of 
Remuneration 
Noting that there are marked differences in 
the climatic conditions of various countries, 
and that the useful hours in the day change 
with the seasons, the Committee recom- 
mended "that wages and hours should be 
established on the basis of free negotiations" 
between the representatives of workers' 
organizations and employers' organizations 
where the latter exist. 

Weekly Hours of Work 

The Committee noted that the question of 
the 40-hour week had already been considered 
on three occasions by Conferences of the ILO 
and that a draft Convention on the subject 
had been adopted in 1936 for Public Works. 

It expressed conviction that a reduction in 
the hours'of work in the construction indus- 
tries — while not practicable for all countries 
in the immediate future, due to the excessive 
amount of work with which these countries 
are faced in nearly every country of the 
world — was nevertheless an objective to be 
attained as soon as conditions permit. It 
therefore requested that the question of the 
40-hour week be placed on the agenda of its 
next meeting. 

Holidays with Pay 

An extensive discussion developed in the 
sub-committee with regard to this question, 
turning particularly on the following two 
points: the affirmation of the right of the 
workers to annual paid vacations, and the 
desirability of including in the text mention 
of the payment for statutory holidays. The 
Canadian employers' member submitted an 
amendment declaring that the Committee 
recognized the "trend" towards payment for 
an annual vacation in addition to the obser- 
vance of recognized public holidays. The 
workers' members opposed this text and 
urged that the resolution should not limit 
itself to recognizing a trend towards pay- 
ment for an annual vacation, but that it 
should affirm the right of the workers to such 
a vacation without making any mention of 
the problem of statutory holidays. The pay- 
ment for the latter did not constitute, from 



their point of view, a subject which could 
usefully be dealt with in an international 
regulation because of the very large diverg- 
encies of national practice in this matter. 

After a lengthy exchange of views, in which 
several members of all three groups took part, 
the sub-committee decided to reject the first 
part of the amendment, and to affirm in its 
resolution the right of the workers to holidays 
with pay, without making reference to pay- 
ment for statutory holidays. However, it 
adopted the second and third paragraphs of 
the proposed amendment, which dealt with 
methods for overcoming the practical diffi- 
culties in applying this policy in the construc- 
tion industries and with the inquiries to be 
undertaken on this topic by the International 
Labour Office. 

The text of the resolution as finally adopted 
was as follows: — 

The Committee considers that the trend 
towards holidays with pay indicates a general 
recognition that the workers in the construc- 
tion industries have a right to same. 

In order to overcome the practical diffi- 
culties in this matter arising from the fluctua- 
tions in employment which are characteristic 
of the construction industries, the Committee 
recommends the creation of compensation 
funds or other devices to ensure such payment. 
It requests the ILO to undertake the 
necessary inquiries into existing practices in 
regard to holidays with a view to making the 
information available to the Committee. 

Guaranteed Weekly Wage 

The Committee adopted a resolution recom- 
mending that workers be guaranteed payment 
for a minimum number of hours each week, 
irrespective of time lost due to inclement 
weather. 

This action followed a long discussion in 
sub-committee concerning a proposed addi- 
tional paragraph, submitted by the Canadian 
employers' member, providing that the guar- 
antee of minimum earnings might take the 
form of a differential to be incorporated in 
the basic hourly rate to compensate for the 
normal expectancy of time lost owing to 
weather conditions. On the workers' side, 
strong opposition was voiced on the grounds 
that what was wanted in the resolution as 
originally submitted was not compensation 
for a right, but the assurance of a minimum 
weekly income to the worker and his family 
and an incentive towards the adoption of 
more modern practices and better planning of 
work on the part of the employers, as this 
should lead to a reduction in time lost owing 
to inclement weather. The amendment was 
lost by a vote of 5 to 14. 
As adopted, the resolution was as follows: — 
The Committee, recognizing that the nature 
of the construction industries subjects the 
workers of these industries to periods of 
inactivity due to inclement weather. 



1947] 



INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL CO-OPERATION 



145 



Recommends to the employers' and workers' 
organizations of the industries that they con- 
sider the principle of assuring to the worker 
payment tor a minimum number of hours 
each week irrespective of time lost due to 
inclement weather, provided his work is 
interrupted by the employer or his agent, 
and he remains available for work and is 
willing to accept reasonable alternative work. 

The Committee requests the International 
Labour Office to undertake an investigation 
into the law and practice of guaranteed 
weekly wages in the various countries and to 
make available the results of such investiga- 
tion. 

Rural Housing 

The Committee pointed out that in nearly- 
all countries the majority of the population 
lives in rural areas and that rural housing is 
in general defective and lacking in sanitary 
provisions. It requested the Office to study 
the matter. 

Industrial Relations 

The Committee expressed the view that the 
right to safeguard their collective interests and 
to seek remedies for their respective griev- 
ances must be accorded equally to employers 
and workers, but declared that in exercising 
this right both parties must at all times have 
full regard to the over-riding necessity for 
furthering the public welfare. 

It urged acceptance of the principles of 
freedom of association, recognition of trade 
unions as bargaining agents, and participation 
of the workers, or their representatives, in 
ensuring standards of safety, health and 
welfare. 

To maintain industrial peace, the Com- 
mittee urged strict observance of all agree- 
ments between the two parties in the 
construction industry, and provision in all 
agreements for the resolution of differences 
of interpretation by negotiation, mediation or 
arbitration. 

Urging collaboration to ensure full activity 
in the construction industry the Committee 
recommended that "close co-operation of 



workers with management should be encour- 
aged in order to give the workers an oppor- 
tunity of following the development of the 
undertaking without interference in the 
exercise of the proper functions of the 
management at any stage." 

It recommended the establishment in each 
country of national joint committees for the 
construction industries. 

"These committees should have the double 
function of exploring the social and economic 
problems of the various branches of these 
industries and of providing means for con- 
sideration of questions arising from the 
proceedings of the Building, Civil Engineering 
and Public Works Committee." 

Finally the Committee requested the Office 
to undertake a comparative study, in the light 
of the discussions at this first session of the 
Committee, of the methods employed in the 
various countries of conducting industrial 
relations in the construction industries, with 
special reference to the following points: — 

(a) methods of establishing labour agree- 
ments between employers and workers; 

(b) joint committees; 

(c) methods of ensuring the observance of 
labour agreements by both employers and 
workers; and * 

(d) methods of avoiding jurisdictional 
disputes between different trade unions oper- 
ating within the industry. 

Closing of Session 

In bringing the Committee's work to an 
end, the Chairman and the Secretary-General 
(Mr. Rens) stressed the spirit of co-operation 
shown by the three groups. This spirit had 
enabled the Committee to adopt unanimously 
a considerable number of resolutions covering 
some of the principal aspects of the problems 
of production and management-labour rela- 
tions in the construction industry. 



International Co-operation Towards Better Standards of Living 



THE following article, reprinted from the 
United Nations Weekly Bulletin, 1 de- 
scribes the work which is being carried on by 
the United Nations and its specialized agencies 
in the field of international social co-operation. 



1 The United Nations Weekly Bulletin, which records 
the activities of the United Nations and its special- 
ized agencies, is distributed in North America by 
International Documents Service, Columbia Uni- 
versity Press, 2960 Broadway, New York 27, New 
York. Price per copy, 15 cents; annual subscription, 
$6.00. 



When the United Nations, in Article 55 of 
the Charter, agreed to promote "higher stand- 
ards of living, full employment and conditions 
of economic and social progress and develop- 
ment," it extended the principle of interna- 
tional co-operation into new and partially 
unexplored fields. 

After the first World War, the League of 
Nations had taken a few steps in the same 
direction. The League endeavoured to encour- 
age social welfare protection for certain of the 



146 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[FEBRUARY 



more defenceless elements of society. It 

worked to eliminate the so-called "white 
slave" traffic in women and children, for 
example, adopted the Geneva Declaration of 
the Rights of the Child and carried out studies 
of various aspects of child welfare. 

The International Labour Organization, 
founded at the same time as the League, went 
further. It attempted to construct an Inter- 
national Labour Code, to protect workers from 
exploitation and to set up standards of social 
insurance. The Code was made up of Con- 
ventions approved by international conferences 
with, government-worker-employer representa- 
tion and submitted to the member govern- 
ments for ratification and embodiment in 
national legislation. By 1939, 63 ILO Conven- 
tions covered all the more important aspects 
of labour and social legislation. While no 
single country had ratified more than half of 
them, the Director of the ILO considered that : 
"In addition to the direct influence which Con- 
ventions exercise when they are ratified and 
embodied in national legislation, there can be 
little doubt that they exercise an indirect 
influence. Their existence sets up a standard 
which public opinion gradually tends to accept 
as normal; and one result of this is that they 
tend to act as a check on any tendency to 
allow conditions of work to be depressed below 
that level in times of difficulty." (Report of 
the Director, June 1939.) 

The 1929 Crisis 

The world economic crisis beginning in 1929 
impelled the ILO to broaden its functions. The 
crisis and the resulting high unemployment in 
the industrialized states caused breakdowns of 
protective social legislation and social insur- 
ance plans. It became obvious that an Inter- 
national Labour Codle was not an adequate 
solution for world social problems. Too many 
countries had no means to put such a code into 
effect. In his 1941 report, the Acting Director 
of the ILO commented : " . . the conclusion 
which has steadily emerged from nearly twenty 
years' experience is that labour legislation in 
the old narrow sense is only a very partial 
remedy for the social evils which the Inter- 
national Labour Organization was created to 
combat." 

The ILO began to study social questions not 
exclusively related to the protection of labour, 
such as nutrition and housing. It entered the 
economic field by making detailed recommen- 
dations for public works projects as remedies 
for unemployment. It initiated regional labour 
conferences and conferences on the problems of 
specific industries. It began to send advisers 
in response to requests from individual coun- 



tries to assist in drafting labour legislation and 
working out the actuarial details of social 
insurance plans. 

Effect of the War 

World War II temporarily paralyzed the 
limited social activities of the League and the 
ILO, but at the same time it gave a new 
impetus to the idea of international co-opera- 
tion to improve the living conditions of all 
peoples. It forced men to appreciate what 
huge intellectual, technical, and material 
resources were now in the grasp of the human 
race, and to realize that they were being im- 
poverished and oppressed by means of the very 
scientific discoveries and methods of mass pro- 
duction which could bring them plenty and 
security. Their leaders spurred them to greater 
war efforts by promising that after victory 
these resources would be devoted to giving 
them a fuller and happier life. 

The Charter of the United Nations confirmed 
these promises. It held out hope of interna- 
tional aid for the countries and non-self- 
governing territories whose level of production 
is too low to provide an adequate living stand- 
ard for their peoples. 

The disorganization caused by the war made 
international protection of the welfare of 
special groups and international agreement on 
standards of labour and social legislation even 
more essential than before, but it was now 
clear that these types of protection were not 
enough. The Charter envisaged action to 
eliminate the causes of social ills as well as to 
mitigate their effects, and recognized that such 
action would contribute to "the creation of 
conditions of stability and well-being which are 
necessary for peaceful and friendly relations 
among nations." The creation of the Eco- 
nomic and Social Council and the Specialized 
Agencies are steps toward the implementation 
of this new concept of international co- 
operation. 

The Temporary Social Commission, which 
the Council created to study methods of 
carrying on the League's activities in the social 
field and additional measures needed to carry 
out the mandate of the Charter, reported last 

May that " social policy must be intimately 

connected with the life of the whole com- 
munity and not only with particular sections 
of it and that its object should be to ensure 
to all a satisfactory basis of living. In other 
words, the essential element of social policy is 
the standard of living. The standard to be 
attained is the well-being of all members of 
the community so as to enable each one to 
develop his personality, in accordance with 
the needs of the community, and at the same 



1947] 



INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL CO-OPERATION 



147 



time to enjoy, from youth to old age, as full a 
life as may foe possible." 

The report added that "social policy is 
closely bound up with economic policy," and 
quoted the words of President Roosevelt: 
"In national as in international affairs, eco- 
nomic policy can no longer be an end in itself ; 
it is merely a means for achieving social 
objectives." 

The Specialized Agencies and Social Policy 

During the same period, conferences of the 
Food and Agriculture Organization, the ILO, 
the World Health Organization, and the 
United Nations Educational, Scientific and 
Cultural Organization (UNESCO), further 
expanded and interpreted the Charter's general 
statement of policy. These organizations 
declared the need for an international social 
policy directed toward raising standards of 
living. They recognized that peace could not 
be firmly based while two-thirds of the people 
of the world are "ill-fed, ill-clothed, and ill- 
housed" and nearly as many barred from the 
great advances in human knowledge by 
illiteracy. They agreed that the goal could 
not be reached by isolated work in one or 
two fields; that a concerted attack on the 
problem through all the factors which influ- 
ence the life of man would be necessary. 

The Constitution of the World Health 
Organization, for example declares: 

"Health is a state of complete physical, 
mental and social well-being and not merely 
the absence of disease or infirmity. 

"The enjoyment of the highest attainable 
standard of health is one of the fundamental 
rights of every human being without dis- 
tinction of race, religion, political belief, 
economic or social condition. 

"The health of all peoples is fundamental 
to the attainment of peace and security and 
is dependent upon the fullest co-operation 
of individual and states." 

Health, by the above definition, is synon3>-- 
mous with the enjoyment of a satisfactory 
living standard. Adequate nutrition, housing, 
clothing, and recreation are as necessary for 
its attainment as medical care and sanitation. 
Behind these social measures there would have 
to be a high level of production and an equit- 
able distribution of goods and services. 

I The ILO, the oldest of the specialized 
agencies, had already endorsed a new and bold 
policy in its Philadelphis Charter of 1944: 
"a. All human beings, irrespective of race, 
creed, or sex, have the right to pursue both 
their material well-being and their spiritual 



dignity, of economic security and equal 
opportunity; 

"b. The attainment of the conditions in 
which this shall be possible must constitute 
the central aim of national and international 
policy ; 

"c. All national and international policies 
and measures, in particular those of an 
economic and financial character, should be 
judged in this light and accepted only in so 
far as they may be held to promote and not 
to hinder the achievement of this funda- 
mental objective; 

"d. It is a responsibility of the Interna- 
tional Labour Organization to examine and 
consider all international economic and 
financial policies and measures in the light 
of this fundamental objective." 

The difficulties which must be conquered 
before the goals outlined in the above state- 
ments can be attained are immense. For most 
of the factors which make up standards of 
living there are not even reliable data as to 
world needs. One specialized agency, the 
FAO, however, has already published a survey 
of world shortages in nutrition. In the late 
1930's, according to this survey, during a 
"normal" period before .World War II had 
cut into food production and disrupted dis- 
tribution, about half of the world's population 
was seriously undernourished, consuming less 
than 2,250 calories per caput daily. About 
one-sixth were surviving at a marginal level 
of nutrition (between 2,250 and 2.750 calories 
daily). Less than a third could obtain high- 
calorie diets. The survey stated that poverty 
was the chief cause of malnutrition. All the 
countries in which the consumption of calories 
per caput was less than 2,250 a day were 
countries in which the average per caput 
income was less than U.S. $100 a year. 

Surveys have yet to be made to establish 
how far world housing, clothing, medical faci- 
lities, and education fall short of human needs. 

The United Nations and the specialized 
agencies have hardly had time to begin to 
translate into practice their unanimous endorse- 
ment of social policies directed toward raising 
standards of living. They now face the 
problem of devising and applying measures 
which are both feasible and constructive in 
the present stage of international organization. 

U.N.'s Social Organization 

The Social Commission and the Economic 
and Employment Commission, which were set 
up by the Economic and Social Council at its 
second session, are authorized by their terms 
of reference to advise the Council on policies 



148 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



designed to promote higher standards of living. 
Under their direction the Departments of 
Social and- Economic Affairs of the Secretariat 
will work out the details and administer the 
application of United Nations policy. 

How are they to carry out this complex 
and highly important task? They will need 
the co-operation not only of the Specialized 
Agencies but of the labour and social welfare 
departments of Member governments, of a 
multitude of private educational and philan- 
thropic foundations, trade unions, co-opera- 
tives, and farmers' associations which have 
been struggling in partial isolation with 
separate aspects of the standard of living 
problem. These organizations possess a rich 
fund of unco-ordinated experience, technical 
facilities, and trained personnel. Most of 
them are eager to integrate their activities 
with those of organizations working in related 
fields. 

Countries Needing International Aid 

No country in the world today can boast 
that the living standards of all sections 
of its people are satisfactory. All can learn 
something from what their neighbours have 
done to remedy social evils. There are two 
categories of countries, however, which 
urgently need international assistance, accord- 
ing to the report of the Temporary Social 
Commission. Their peoples were described 
in this report as follows: "At least half the 
peoples of the world are living — by no fault of 
their own — under such poor and inadequate 
conditions that they cannot, out of their own 
scanty resources, achieve decent standards of 
living." 

The first category which the Temporary 
Commission cited are those in which poverty 
has been brought about by war devastation. 
Their first objective is to return to their pre- 
war standards as a basis for further gains. 

The second category includes many of the 
Asiatic, African, and Latin American countries 
and territories, in which most of the people 
lived on a miserable subsistence standard even 



in so-called "normal" times. These countries 
do not really lack resources. If that were true, 
they could improve their standards only by 
some kind of permanent dole from the 
wealthier powers. They are, however, unable 
to make use of their potential resources, 
material and human. Their peasants and work- 
ers are too much handicapped by undernourish- 
ment, illiteracy, and endemic disease to take 
advantage of modern industrial and agricul- 
tural techniques. Many of these countries are 
making great efforts to raise the standard of 
living, and some have achieved considerable 
progress in recent j'ears. But international 
support is urgently needed in order to bring 
about adequate improvement. They lack 
trained personnel. The Temporary Commis- 
sion believed that these countries must be 
helped themselves, and that the most advanced 
techniques which the world has developed must 
be made available to them, not piecemeal, but 
so integrated as to enable them to solve the 
whole indivisible problem. 

Co-ordinated Planning Not New 

Co-ordinated social and economic planning 
to raise the status of underdeveloped regions 
within states is not a new or untried idea. 
The U.S.S.R. in particular has carried out plans 
of this type on the largest scale and under 
severe handicaps. A good example of such 
planning is the Tennessee Valley Authority 
in the United States, which began as a project 
for increasing electric power and has been used 
to raise the standard of living in a number of 
ways. The work of the United States Office of 
Inter-American Affairs, which has undertaken 
as one of its tasks that of aiding the Latin 
American republics to improve their health 
services and food supplies, also deserves close 
study. These examples, as well as a number of 
unaided programs carried out by several small 
countries, will help the organs of the United 
Nations find out what to do and what to avoid, 
and studies on these programs are beinq: 
scheduled by the Secretariat to assist the two 
newlv-formed Commissions in their work. 



Factory Inspection in the United Kingdom in 1945 

Hours of Work — Personnel Management — Accidents — Industrial 
Health — Enforcement 



r T A HE opportunity to raise the level of 
■*- working conditions afforded) by the per- 
iod of reconstruction after the war is being 
welcomed generally, according to the 1945 
Report of the Chief Inspector of Factories in 
the United Kingdom. Not only workers but 
managers and executives who have had a taste 
of working in a weld-run, airy and well-equip- 
ped modern factory are reluctant to go back 
to the former conditions in some industries, 
old buildings, ill-lit and badly ventilated, with 
few or none of the welfare facilities and sup- 
erior amenities of the new establishments, 
including the canteen which provides a hot 
meal and mid-spell snacks. The necessary 
reconversion of plants from war to peace-time 
uses, in many cases to turn out an entirely 
different product, permits, to some extent, the 
modernization of buildings and of equipment, 
and the scarcity of labour emphasizes the need 
for these changes and for attractive conditions 
generally if workers are to be secured. 
Hampering such developments for the time is 
the shortage of materials, including paint. 

Needed, too, in the Chief Inspector's opinion, 
are entirely new premises to replace "the 
legacy of antiquated buildings" with small 
rooms, low ceilings and small window-space, 
and the converted' domestic properties, equally 
unsuitable, which have been used as work- 
shops. Such places have deteriorated further 
during the war. Most of them employ under 
50 persons. "Broadly speaking, the smaller the 
factory the worse it is housed . . . the title 
sometimes applied to them of 'slum' or 'back- 
yard' factories is well deserved." The scarcity 
of suitable alternative accommodation for the 
small factories presents difficulties at the 
moment but the Chief Inspector suggests that 
the best solution is the building of "flatted" 
factories to be let to several small occupiers. 

The buildings should be provided with 
canteens and other services of a better stan- 
dard and greater variety than could be 
hoped for if provision were left to isolated 
occupiers. 

In addition to the new and modern premises 
required, the prime need, apart from matters 
of safety and health, at the end of the war 
when the removal of the black-out revealed 
general dilapidation and the shabbiness of 
interiors, was 

a general spring-clean — cleansing, tidying-up, 
repair and refit to bring factories back to 



their pre-war standard and the introduction 
of more light and colour to brighten them 
up and take them a step beyond. 

Associated with these problems of new 
buildings and modernizing old ones are the 
problems of better general ventilation (quite 
apart from the difficult problem of the removal 
of dust and fumes by localized ventilation), 
good lighting, its quality and distribution, and 
the introduction of colour into the factory. 

Hours of Work 

The hours of employment of women and of 
persons under 18 are limited by the Factories 
Act, 1937, to 48 in a week but the Act places 
no restriction on the working hours of adult 
men. There is provision for relaxing the 48- 
hour limit under certain conditions. Hours of 
young persons between 14 and 16 must not 
exceed 44. 

The emergency relaxations permitting longer 
day hours for women dropped from 16,700 in 
February, 1945 to 6,500 in November. For 
shift-work schemes, the number of orders in 
November was about half that in February. 
The shortage of labour in some areas and the 
general shortage of male labour continued! to 
make relaxation of the Act necessary. Fac- 
tors temporarily affecting the general or local 
supply of labour were the return of many work- 
people to their homes from areas where they 
had been employed during the war and the 
withdrawal of many married women from 
employment. 

The general tendency to shorter hours, 
which was noted last year, has continued. A 
44 or 45-hour week is "quite commonly found", 
and is the normal practice in certain industries, 
notably the printing industry, boots and shoes 
and some sections of the clothing industry, and 
it is also commonly found in individual fac- 
tories in a wide variety of industries. As 
regards the five-day week; 

it seems to be the general experience that 
the system is most successful when the 
weekly hours are limited to 45 or less — 
otherwise it becomes necessary to extend 
the working day beyond nine hours on some 
days of the week, and both employers and 
employees seem to be agreed that this is 
inadvisable and not conducive to maximum 
output. The popularity of the five-day week 
system is undoubted, and in parts of the Mid- 
lands and Southern England its use has ex- 
tended rapidly. There is a close connection 



149 



80682—3 



150 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



[FEBRUARY 



between the use of this system and the place 
of residence of the workpeople. If they have 
a long journey between their homes and the 
factories they are reluctant to undertake this 
in order to put in only a morning's work, and 
absenteeism on Saturday morning tends to be 
abnormally large. This no doubt accounts for 
the large number of factories in London 
which have adopted the system. In many 
parts of London now a factory working on 
the six-day system is badly handicapped in 
the competition for the limited supply of 
labour, since there are so many opportunities 
of obtaining employment which involves work 
on only five days a week. 

The decline in shift working was due, largely, 
to its abandonment in munitions factories but, 
in part, to the attempt to bring the emergency 
double-day-shift systems within the provisions 
of the Employment of Women and Young 
Persons Act, 1936. 

These provisions, now amended somewhat 
from the original enactment of 1920, which was 
copied with some changes in Ontario in Ii932 
and in Quebec in 1935, permit women and 
young persons over 16 to be emploj'ed on two 
shifts averaging not more than eight hours 
each between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. on every 
weekday except Saturday when the permitted 
period is from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Act stip- 
ulates, however, that this system may be intro- 
duced for the first time, except in new factories 
where it is to be a permanent system, only with 
the consent of the workers as expressed in a 
secret ballot. As to the employees' attitude, 
the Report states: 

In one case the employees had worked 
throughout the war on the double-day-shift 
system without any indication that it was 
distasteful to them. The management arrang- 
ed for the ballot without misgiving but the 
result showed that out of 134 persons entitled 
to vote precisely one had cast his vote in 
favour of shift working. At the present 
moment there is little risk that anyone who 
is seriously opposed to working on the system 
will be required to undertake it, but it may 
be that those who would be prepared to vol- 
unteer for it will be out-voted. Moreover, 
the employers suspect that in some cases the 
voting is apt to be influenced by extraneous 
issues and that the result of the ballot doe9 
not necessarily indicate the real opinion of 
the voters on shift working. If this is so the 
remedy seems to be more comprehensive 
explanation to the workpeople of the circum- 
stances, including particularly the economic 
circumstances, which create a need for shift 
working. 

Personnel Management 

One of the striking developments of the war 
noted by the Chief Inspector, "and one that 
is surely destined to be of the very first 
importance in the post-war industrial world," 
is the emphasis now placed on the psychologi- 
cal aspects of employment, "on the value of 
the individual human being in industry." 



The 1914-18 war was notable for the recog- 
nition for the first time on a wide scale of 
the need for the physical amenities provided 
by good welfare; the recent war years, while 
emphasizing, these necessities still more 
strongly have advanced the whole conception 
of what has become known as labour or per- 
sonnel management to include the psychologi- 
cal side of all work and, in particular, the 
study of the right relations between man 
and man that are necessary for the smooth- 
working of all engaged in a common enter- 
prise on the floor of the workshop. 

The great increase in the number of per- 
sonnel officers in industry is considered a 
promising sign but 

perhaps the most hopeful advance as far as 
mental outlook is concerned has been the idea 
of joint consultation between management 
and workers through the more general accept- 
ance of Works Committees. Through these 
agencies will come a greater common interest 
in industry and a far greater recognition of 
the worker both as an individual and as a 
human being of intelligence and feeling. Care 
must be taken that the advances gained are 
not lost in the ensuing years either through a 
false economy or a lack of interest. There is 
even great scope for development, and with 
this in mind a Personnel Management Branch 
has been formed within the Department to 
encourage this side of factory welfare in all 
its branches and in all types of firms. 

There has also been news of the starting 
of pensonnel departments in factories in such 
diverse industries as printing, clothing, 
engineering, cotton, hosiery, linen thread, 
bricks, boots and shoes, food processing and 
drop forging; and Welfare Supervisors have 
been appointed by pottery firms. 

However, it appears to the Factory Depart- 
ment 

that many employers who have accepted the 
principle of personnel management are not 
deriving full benefit from it because they 
have not realized the importance of taking 
a great deal of trouble to get the right men 
or women for the work, and of ensuring 
really efficient organization of the personnel 
department. The appointment of unsuitable 
or inexperienced Personnel Officers has led 
to instances of partial or complete failure of 
schemes. Personnel Management covers a 
very wide and varied field and the need for 
the careful selection and training of those 
engaged in it cannot be overstressed. There 
are few kinds of work for which that inde- 
finable quality known as personality is eo 
essential. But even the right person cannot 
be expected to use his abilities to the best 
advantage without the necessary knowledge 
and training which the work demands. Fail- 
ure on the part of firms to consider their per- 
sonnel policy fully and to define the func- 
tions of the Personnel Officer before the 
appointment was made and failure to explain 
the scheme to the managerial and supervisory 
staff have also, in some cases, been reasons 
for lack of success in starting a new personnel 
department. 

Nearly all the reports received stress the 
need for making the principles of good per- 
sonnel management widely known in the 
smaller factories which are not large enough 
to employ a whole-time Personnel Officer and 
in which the personnel functions must be 



1947] 



FACTORY INSPECTION IN UNITED KINGDOM 



151 



carried out by executives who also have other 
duties. These form a large proportion of the 
total number of factories in the country, and 
in them there is great opportunity for 
development. 

The need for expert advice is therefore 
clear. ... A staff of Advisers consisting of 
men and women with wide experience as 
Personnel Officers is being recruited. It is 
hoped to have an Adviser in each of the 
Divisions of the Factory Inspectorate who 
will be available to help firms wishing to set 
up new personnel departments or to improve 
existing organizations; and to give practical 
help and guidance on the technique of their 
job to the large number of inexperienced 
Personnel Officers now in industry and to 
the smaller firms where the functions of 
personnel management will be carried out 
by existing members of the staff and where 
advice is so often needed and welcomed. 

Accidents 

An accident in a factory which causes loss 
of life or which disables any person for more 
than three days from earning full wages at his 
usual work must be notified to the Inspector 
by the occupier of the factory under a max- 
imum penalty of £20. 

A substantial decrease in both fatal and non- 
fatal accidents was reported in 1945, the fourth 
successive year to show a decline in fatal acci- 
dents from the peak number of 1,646 in 1941. 
The 851 accidental deaths reported in 1945 is 
the lowest in ten years. Non-fatal accidents in 
factories in 1945 numbered 239,802, as com- 
pared with the high of 313,267 in 1942. 

These figures represent an approximate acci- 
dent rate in 1945 of 37 per 1,000 persons 
employed in factories, in 1942 of 43, and in 
1939 of 28 per 1,000 factory workers. These 
rates do not take into account the hours 
worked but they serve to indicate the general 
trend of accident rates. It is pointed out that 
in times of industrial activity, the record 
shows, not only is the number of accidents 
higher but the ratio of accidents to workers 
employed increases, 

the natural result of longer exposure to risk 
through lengthened hours of work, the in- 
creased tempo of production, the effects of 
fatigue and influx into industry of less skilled 
and experienced workers. .. .an unmistakable 
pointer to the need in such times for special 
attention to safety measures and proper 
training and supervision. 

A decline in the severity of accidents gener- 
ally, as well as in the frequency rate of fatal- 
ities is inferred by the Chief Inspector from 
the facts available, including the steady 
decrease for some years in machinery accidents, 
a type which often gives rise to severe injuries. 
The percentage of the total of power-mach- 
inery accidents fell from 20-2 in 1935 to 18-3 
in 1938, 17-1 in 1942, 16-7 in 1943, 15-6 in 1944, 
and to 14-9 in 1945. 
80682— 3i 



Women 

Accidents to women were fewer in all indus- 
tries in which they were employed. The 1945 
figure of 44,208 accidents, though very high as 
compared with pre-war figures, is nearly 30 
per cent lower than in 1944, a real decrease in 
the rate, since the number of women employed 
fell by only 14 per cent. To this result, 

many factors have no doubt contributed, such 
as their increased skill and experience, less 
employment on the heavier and more danger- 
ous work as wartime production came to an 
end and men became available to replace 
them, and better safeguarding of the mach- 
inery on which they were employed. As one 
instance, the publicity given to hair entangle- 
ment accidents has shown good results and the 
guarding of drill spindles and lathe stock- 
bars, which together were responsible for the 
majority of these accidents, is now general. 

Young Persons 

As regards young persons, emphasis is again 
placed on the high accident rate among boys 
under 18 years of age, 54 per 1,000 employed as 
compared with 49 for men over 18, and 20 for 
women over 18, and 18 for girls. These figures 

clearly call not only for a high standard of 
safety precautions, but also for special mea- 
sures of education, training and control, espec- 
ially during the early months, which are 
known to be by far the most dangerous period. 

The problem should be viewed against its 
background of youthful spirits and inexper- 
ience : 

For these youngsters the ordinary risks are 
accentuated by ignorance of where the dangers 
lie, lack of the experience and skill which may 
often enable an older worker to avoid an acci- 
dent, and the natural curiosity and high 
spirits of youth itself. Some of the very 
qualities we like to see in a keen and lively 
boy are those which may lead him into trouble 
when he goes straight from school into the 
new world of the factory with its fresh inter- 
est and unknown potentialities for danger. . . . 
It is true that a large proportion of these 
young person accidents are comparatively 
slight, but a considerable number of fatalities 
are recorded every year. Others result in 
permanent injuries which are a handicap for 
life. Accidents on machines, though fortun- 
ately forming only a small minority of the 
whole, are often of this nature and the first 
necessity is to see that protection of a very 
high standard is maintained and that safe- 
guarding is adapted to the needs of the young 
person with his more slender hands and 
fingers. 

The need for seeing that boys and girls are 
gradually initiated into factory life should 
be obvious; and yet we continue to find cases 
where they are put to work (or "allowed" to 
work — because they are often eager to do so) 
on power-driven machinery almost as soon 
as they set foot in a factory. 

This tendency of young persons to meddle 
and explore and get into mischief shows itself 
particularly when they are engaged on tedious 
or inactive work. Good supervision can do 



152 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 



FEBRUARY 



much to check it and some firms are trying 
to get more at the root of the trouble by 
arranging breaks for physical exercise. 

Accidents due to "skylarking" are specially 
liable to occur during .mealtimes when super- 
vision is relaxed . . If new entrants were 
taken round the works and the principal 
dangers were explained to them it would do 
a great deal to prevent such accidents. But 
the real solution seems to be to provide some 
alternative and safer means of recreation 
such as that quoted by an Inspector: "The 
mealtime club for young persons opened last 
year in a Tees-side shipyard in an attempt 
to keep them out of mischief has been a 
great success. It is now run by a committee 
of youths elected by ballot and since its 
inception not a single reportable accident has 
occurred to a young person in the yard during 
the mid-day break." 

Perhaps most important of all is the part 
which training in safe methods and practices 
can play in reducing these young person 
accidents. The factory training schools and 
training schemes which have lately been 
developing can be, and often are, of great 
value in this way, but unfortunately in some 
of them sufficient attention is not yet given 
to the safety side of training. 

These are all well-known and tried methods 
of tackling the problem. A new and very 
interesting approach has been made in a 
large works where a system of "works 
guardians" has been adopted. The object is 
to "see that every boy who comes into the 
factory has a man from the body of the 
factory — an ordinary sound sensible person — 
who can be the individual friend and mentor 
of the boy, particularly in his introduction to 
factory life." This personal interest and 
friendly eye should do much to save the boy 
from the risks he may so easily incur through 
inexperience or recklessness, and it is an 
example which might well be followed 
elsewhere. 

Old Persons 

At the other end of the scale are the acci- 
dents to persons between 70 and 80 years of 
age who have remained at work during the 
war period and who are still being encouraged 
to continue on the job. To these, strains and 
falls are frequent causes of accidents, and a 
proper grading of jobs is desirable for them 
as for juveniles. 

Many of the jobs now being done by 
youngsters are irksome to youth because of 
their inactivity or lack of interest; others 
are of the "dead-end" type. Perhaps some of 
these jobs could be more suitably and will- 
ingly done by older people wishing to con- 
tinue on lighter and less demanding work 
after pensionable age. 

Non-Machinery Accidents 

To prevent machinery accidents, positive 
measures can be taken and enforced by law 
but the 85 per cent non-machinery accidents 
present another problem, one difficult, if not 
impossible to control by legislation. In the 
Chief Inspector's opinion, only better factory 



supervision and organization and greater care 
can combat these accidents successfully. 

The largest class of non-machinery acci- 
den